Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Scariest place in NI?

Different cultures, and different generations approach history in different ways. Us English (of my generation, the generation of retreat from Empire) have no recollection of any of that, yet a cloying affection lingers, for myths of Vera Lyn's bluebirds and The Few.

Go to Glesgae, on the other hand, and there are pub urinals of recent installation, in whose porcelain can be read a brief history of the Highland Clearances.

Likewise in the Balkans, where The Field Of Blackbirds is treated like it's still somebody's open wound deserving of eye-for-an-eye retribution.

the right divisive issue, effecting people’s day to day lives, an issue that have invested in (time, blood, sacrifices etc)and it happens
 
Many of those who were planted into Ulster coming from ..... Scotland
They were probably the 'Nigerians' of their day, claiming political asylum from the dastardly English...........arriving in rubber boats trying to outwit the watchers at Larne and arriving at the dole office in Belfast to cry's of 'send the buggers back'!
 
I thought that the M79 round/grenade had to travel a few metres before it was armed?
No idea, but we all heard the bang, even from the bunker 60m below the ground floor. We didn't use the special tunnel as the rails were being repaired, and using the rooftop helipad would have meant possible exposure to danger, so we tactically waited until someone opened the gate and drove out at high speed, past some fellow waving a smoking barrel around and crying.
 
1 Gren Gds, 1 Staffs, 42 RM, 2 Para (chronologically) were the four units in 3 Bde 1984. 3 RGJ only Jacket battalion in the Province that year with 39 Bde. Best ND(s) I ever heard of was in Belfast '77 when, during a conversation in the Ops Rm about a Private who had just let one go, it was revealed that the Bn Adjt, whose job was to deal with the matter, had himself had two NDs with a 9mm Browning during the tour (2 Para, Dec 76 to Mar 77). ETA to correct tour dates :-(
None of that lot; might have the year wrong; 83?
 
They were probably the 'Nigerians' of their day, claiming political asylum from the dastardly English...........arriving in rubber boats trying to outwit the watchers at Larne and arriving at the dole office in Belfast to cry's of 'send the buggers back'!

bearing in mind we are talking about the 1600’s

they had to be loyal to King James, Protestant and speak English. They received land that had belonged to Catholics.
 

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
. . . . and the immortal phrase from The Pamphlet, of the variety: "upon operating the trigger, you will hear a loud 'click'" :thumleft:

In my youth I, on my motorcycle (100cc of two-stroke fun... I was a student, 120mpg had its appeal for commuting to university) got taken out by a Toyota Supra that lost control, spun across the oncoming traffic, and hit me broadside-on as I was waiting to turn right out of a 'T' junction. The impact sent me flying over his roof (taking out the entire windscreen, half of which seemed to end up in my leather jacket, and flattening part of the roof - payback, mater-fornicator!) to land on my back in the road with a not-quite-boneshattering impact.

That was about the only sensation I've experienced that was similar to firing an 84mm Medium Antitank Weapon.

As was said of an overachieving handgun in Edwardian times, "Nobody who had fired this weapon once, wished to fire it a second time..." - youth and bravado and the novelty of the experience meant we all stood up to get a few rounds off, but I'd have hated to be told I had to fire it enough to become proficient.

(I'm told LAW80 was even worse...)
 
It does, but it's a chunky round, and has a lot of propellant going 'BOOM' behind it - at a range of zero feet, that alone would suddenly make a big old dent in anybody's sandpit.
We 'did' the weapon on my Sgts' course in the Australian Army. But that was in 1984 . . . sweet piece of kit as I recall and very accurate.
 
In my youth I, on my motorcycle (100cc of two-stroke fun... I was a student, 120mpg had its appeal for commuting to university) got taken out by a Toyota Supra that lost control, spun across the oncoming traffic, and hit me broadside-on as I was waiting to turn right out of a 'T' junction. The impact sent me flying over his roof (taking out the entire windscreen, half of which seemed to end up in my leather jacket, and flattening part of the roof - payback, mater-fornicator!) to land on my back in the road with a not-quite-boneshattering impact.

That was about the only sensation I've experienced that was similar to firing an 84mm Medium Antitank Weapon.

As was said of an overachieving handgun in Edwardian times, "Nobody who had fired this weapon once, wished to fire it a second time..." - youth and bravado and the novelty of the experience meant we all stood up to get a few rounds off, but I'd have hated to be told I had to fire it enough to become proficient.

(I'm told LAW80 was even worse...)
I fired it once.......at Warcop I think........thought someone had kicked me in the bollox................................until, that is, someone actually did kick me in the bollox.
 

Bluenose2

Old-Salt
Slight thread drift.

The old man (RIP) only fired a live round from his 84mm 'Charlie-G' once, in the work up to Aden (and missed the target).

I don't think he particularly enjoyed the experience. The chap alongside him on the range, called Marine Blackman, did slightly better.

Several months later, they were told that one of them needed to go on a tasking with the 84mm for some reason. The other Marine pulled the short straw and went out, and took a non-fatal headshot from a sniper.

blackman.png

My Dad helped bring him back in, and - in his own words I found posthumously on the OAMAAM forum - couldn't believe he was still alive. From memory, Blackman died in the early 70s as a direct result of his injuries.

A little later, the old man was positioned on the perimeter as they covered the final heli withdrawal, staring down the sights of his CG at a NFL 'technical' that had brazenly turned up (replete with Vickers or similar mounted on the back) to watch the hated Brits fly away. Thankfully, discretion prevailed on their part and no shots were fired.
 
Slight thread drift.

The old man (RIP) only fired a live round from his 84mm 'Charlie-G' once, in the work up to Aden (and missed the target).

I don't think he particularly enjoyed the experience. The chap alongside him on the range, called Marine Blackman, did slightly better.

Several months later, they were told that one of them needed to go on a tasking with the 84mm for some reason. The other Marine pulled the short straw and went out, and took a non-fatal headshot from a sniper.

View attachment 516290
My Dad helped bring him back in, and - in his own words I found posthumously on the OAMAAM forum - couldn't believe he was still alive. From memory, Blackman died in the early 70s as a direct result of his injuries.

A little later, the old man was positioned on the perimeter as they covered the final heli withdrawal, staring down the sights of his CG at a NFL 'technical' that had brazenly turned up (replete with Vickers or similar mounted on the back) to watch the hated Brits fly away. Thankfully, discretion prevailed on their part and no shots were fired.
I can't think of any 20th Century post-war mission more sh!tty than the one in Aden.
 
Slight thread drift.

The old man (RIP) only fired a live round from his 84mm 'Charlie-G' once, in the work up to Aden (and missed the target).

I don't think he particularly enjoyed the experience. The chap alongside him on the range, called Marine Blackman, did slightly better.

Several months later, they were told that one of them needed to go on a tasking with the 84mm for some reason. The other Marine pulled the short straw and went out, and took a non-fatal headshot from a sniper.

View attachment 516290
My Dad helped bring him back in, and - in his own words I found posthumously on the OAMAAM forum - couldn't believe he was still alive. From memory, Blackman died in the early 70s as a direct result of his injuries.

A little later, the old man was positioned on the perimeter as they covered the final heli withdrawal, staring down the sights of his CG at a NFL 'technical' that had brazenly turned up (replete with Vickers or similar mounted on the back) to watch the hated Brits fly away. Thankfully, discretion prevailed on their part and no shots were fired.

An interesting name, given what happened in Afghanistan and afterwards via court-martial and Court of Appeal.
 

Latest Threads

Top