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Scariest place in NI?

It’s true you could walk into the wrong pub 20 years ago very easily.... things have improved greatly since

From the book I mentioned there was a lot of spots along the border

The CSM of a Company I was in the 70's was a Congo medal-wearing ex-Irish Army soldier who had been forced from home. Sad state of affairs.
 
Lightweights. For a real ND, you need to fire off 84mm TPTP in the 25m range...
That's not heavy duty, FFS,

Into the SNCO accomodation block is the benchmark for 84mm ammo upfvcks in NI if memory serves.

Royles, ISTR.

. . . . and the immortal phrase from The Pamphlet, of the variety: "upon operating the trigger, you will hear a loud 'click'" :thumleft:
 
The civil war was far more polarised than that. You had brothers fighting on opposing sides in many many cases.

a lot of families had children that they were never allowed speak of again.

that continued on for a long number of years as families continued to vote as if the Civil War had just happened. In many cases that continued on into the next generation (“this is a Fianna Fáil house” for example)
I wonder if the underlying psychology of the thing is something to do with the same gene that afflicted the miners in the north of England. Even from my time there are former friends and families who don't/won't speak because of the 1984-5 Strike.
 
I wonder if the underlying psychology of the thing is something to do with the same gene that afflicted the miners in the north of England. Even from my time there are former friends and families who don't/won't speak because of the 1984-5 Strike.
Different cultures, and different generations approach history in different ways. Us English (of my generation, the generation of retreat from Empire) have no recollection of any of that, yet a cloying affection lingers, for myths of Vera Lyn's bluebirds and The Few.

Go to Glesgae, on the other hand, and there are pub urinals of recent installation, in whose porcelain can be read a brief history of the Highland Clearances.

Likewise in the Balkans, where The Field Of Blackbirds is treated like it's still somebody's open wound deserving of eye-for-an-eye retribution.
 
Oh, ok. 1984ish. Ptl returns, tired and mucky, gunner fails to do something he should do, and the sand in the trap sprayed out absolutely all over the driveway at front of t'mill. Bn ops instantly stood everyone to, much scuttling around, consultation of maps showing mortar baseplate analyses, orders barked with Military Precision and Authority, troops deployed at fast double, Bessbrook village wonders whether it should panic. Sheepish gunner raises hand. BBK Coy gets another rocket. QM furious about sandy mess. W'breath and pals disappear to t' Pot Belly for stiff snifters.

No idea which bn it was, after all this time; they all look the same to me, anyway. Think it might have been RGJ...
1 Gren Gds, 1 Staffs, 42 RM, 2 Para (chronologically) were the four units in 3 Bde 1984. 3 RGJ only Jacket battalion in the Province that year with 39 Bde. Best ND(s) I ever heard of was in Belfast '77 when, during a conversation in the Ops Rm about a Private who had just let one go, it was revealed that the Bn Adjt, whose job was to deal with the matter, had himself had two NDs with a 9mm Browning during the tour (2 Para, Dec 76 to Mar 77). ETA to correct tour dates :-(
 
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Oh, ok. 1984ish. Ptl returns, tired and mucky, gunner fails to do something he should do, and the sand in the trap sprayed out absolutely all over the driveway at front of t'mill. Bn ops instantly stood everyone to, much scuttling around, consultation of maps showing mortar baseplate analyses, orders barked with Military Precision and Authority, troops deployed at fast double, Bessbrook village wonders whether it should panic. Sheepish gunner raises hand. BBK Coy gets another rocket. QM furious about sandy mess. W'breath and pals disappear to t' Pot Belly for stiff snifters.

No idea which bn it was, after all this time; they all look the same to me, anyway. Think it might have been RGJ...
I thought that the M79 round/grenade had to travel a few metres before it was armed?
 
Go to Glesgae, on the other hand, and there are pub urinals of recent installation, in whose porcelain can be read a brief history of the Highland Clearances.
Interesting since there always was a sizable 'loyalist' community in the West of Scotland - Glasgow in particular. Many 20th century so called historians have written that the Highlanders were, in the majority, Catholic. No so - though the Stuarts enjoyed Papal support, the Highland army at Culloden was around 95% Protestant. These figures are based on contemporary Parish records. Over a period of time it appears there was an attempt, particularly by lowland scholars to paint the 'enemy' forces as Catholic.

Perhaps the urinaters of Glesga ken their history.
 
It’s true you could walk into the wrong pub 20 years ago very easily.... things have improved greatly since

From the book I mentioned there was a lot of spots along the border
Around 1975 I had occasion to walk in to the Camlough Inn one fine day. When I came out, the young fella with me said "don't go back in their, they think your a Brit"..........I think he meant 'spy'. I assured him most indignantly that I was absolutely not working :cool:
 
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Inconceivable. Impossible.

Adjutants are less fallible even than the archangel Gabriel himself
N.E. Fule kno dat.
David Ellis's book (A Winter in Belfast) didn't look as though it was as enjoyable as it proved. Though another 'oral history' of remembrances, it was surprisingly lively - he doesn't pull too many punches either and names all the names. Refreshing in a way.
 
Interesting since there always was a sizable 'loyalist' community in the West of Scotland - Glasgow in particular. Many 20th century so called historians have written that the Highlanders were, in the majority, Catholic. No so - though the Stuarts enjoyed Papal support, the Highland army at Culloden was around 95% Protestant. These figures are based on contemporary Parish records. Over a period of time it appears there was an attempt, particularly by lowland scholars to paint the 'enemy' forces as Catholic.

Perhaps the urinaters of Glesga ken their history.
Many of those who were planted into Ulster coming from ..... Scotland
 

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