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Scariest place in NI?

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Seeing the Irish Army descends from the National Army which itself was formed from Sinn Fein/IRA I think republican may in itself be a euphemism.
Caution advised. The Free State (National) Army which fought the CIvil War did trace descent to the old unified IRA which fought the British and the RIC; however, the fraction which hived off to fight the Free State and reject the Treaty - the so-called Old IRA - never came on board with the National Army.

The National Army was the recipient of a great deal of British aid and support and a lot of WW1 veterans signed up for the Civil War, who'd not been involved in the fighting against the Brits.

Confusingly, pretty much every armed group, from the Irish Army to the I Can't Believe It's Not The IRA dissidents of today, calls or called itself 'Oglaigh Na hEireann' or 'Irish Volunteers/Warriors'.
 
Caution advised. The Free State (National) Army which fought the CIvil War did trace descent to the old unified IRA which fought the British and the RIC; however, the fraction which hived off to fight the Free State and reject the Treaty - the so-called Old IRA - never came on board with the National Army.

The National Army was the recipient of a great deal of British aid and support and a lot of WW1 veterans signed up for the Civil War, who'd not been involved in the fighting against the Brits.

Confusingly, pretty much every armed group, from the Irish Army to the I Can't Believe It's Not The IRA dissidents of today, calls or called itself 'Oglaigh Na hEireann' or 'Irish Volunteers/Warriors'.

I had anecdotally heard that the Reserves were largely populated by anti-treaty types. Accepted as a sort of de facto balance to the Regulars.

No word on the standard of regulation though.
 
It all dates from the late 80s/early 90s; some senior officer's Bright Idea. The idea was that there would be no independent sub-units in NI.
That would tie in with the creation of 21 Tpt & Mov Regt RCT, which later became NI CSS Bn I think. Up until then 26 Sqn had been independent since formation at The Curragh in the 20s.

ETA. 21 Regt also subsumed the HQNI arms/services advisor roles so I was both Regtl 2IC and SO2 Tpt.
 
With respect, you seem to have been the only person misled. I was quite clear - and remain convinced - that, absent the political imperative which decreed that every sub-unit-sized organisation in NI should have a unit-level entity over the top of it, the two Lisburn squadrons, with quite discrete and well-understood taskings - and existing operational command and control arrangements - were perfectly capable of operating effectively and efficiently without, as they had done for years.

Your experience may well vary, certainly, I was never aware of any operational, administrative or organisational advantage to my squadron of being part of 15 Signal Regiment. Quite the contrary in a number of ways; to be fair, it must have been intensely irritating to the Regimental hierarchy to have close to zero visibility of the activities of one of its sub-units.
I don't think that our views are mutually exclusive, even though they don't converge.

RHQ 15SR was largely irrelevant in the daily operational lives of most of the troops under its C2. If RHQ had not existed the squadrons, and in some cases troops, would have fallen under the C2 of those that gave them their actual taskings. I think I get your point, with which I don't necessarily entirely disagree, but as a whole organisation 15SR played a critical role.
 
That would tie in with the creation of 21 Tpt & Mov Regt RCT, which later became NI CSS Bn I think. Up until then 26 Sqn had been independent since formation at The Curragh in the 20s.

ETA. 21 Regt also subsumed the HQNI arms/services advisor roles so I was both Regtl 2IC and SO2 Tpt.
In the early/mid seventies the permanent RCT transport sqn in NI was 18/26 sqn RCT based in Lisburn. An excellent bunch of guys. I think 18sqn had been stationed in Ireland permanently since it was formed in about 1914 in Dublin and moved up to NI in 1922 after partition.

As there were still British troops stationed in the Free State in the Treaty ports until 1937, I wonder how they were supplied. By sea or overland from NI?
 
Quite legal to cross the border in hot pursuit - up to 5km - but for “observation“ only.
In 1973 flying in a Scout Helicopter from Dungannon to Omagh. An officer flying and me sitting in the back admiring the view. Captain Biggles has his map in his hands looking a bit lost (can you see a trend here). That part of the route was pretty much the cuds.

He has his window open and is still looking confused, when he takes his hand off the map to fly the helicopter or something when the map flies out of the window. No problem I thought. I have seen the films he will have some sort of auto navigation wizardry. Little did I know that AAC navigation aids hadn't changed since the days of the RFC. He asked me if I knew the way, which I didn't as I had only done it a few times before at this stage.

Captain Biggles then flies down to the nearest road and starts looking at road signs. There are trucks, cars and buses going past us, and I thought that at one point he was going to make me get out, flag down a vehicle and ask for directions! However we eventually got to Omagh by following the road signs, where we landed, had a cup of tea, refueled and he got a new map from the 1RTR Air Troop based there.

Eventually over 30 months I did the route so often that I knew it off by heart and would point out to new aircrew looking at their map a bit confused that they just needed to follow the tracks of the old railway line from Dungannon to Omagh. However with Captain Biggles navigation I am suprised that we didn't end up in Dublin.
 
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That would tie in with the creation of 21 Tpt & Mov Regt RCT, which later became NI CSS Bn I think. Up until then 26 Sqn had been independent since formation at The Curragh in the 20s.

ETA. 21 Regt also subsumed the HQNI arms/services advisor roles so I was both Regtl 2IC and SO2 Tpt.

You mean 21 Log Sup Regt RLC...? At least that's what my leaving gift said.
 
Which meant no 40mm grenades from the M203
I believe I am right to say that many 40mm rounds were fired in the Province over time, but precious few if any in anger: accidental discharges, into the ground, before the fuse had travelled far enough to prime, triggered by blackthorn hedge branches, and impacting at the feet of the poor sod who happened to have a loaded M79 slung over his shoulder at the time, was the story as I remember it.
 
Not sure this is the right thread - but I've just clocked (on Amazon Kindle for less than 2 quid) "Undercover War: Britain's Special Forces and their secret battle against the IRA" by Harry McCallion.

Is it worth a coupla quid, or is it 9 carat bullenscheisse?

 
We seem to agree, but the wording of your post was misleading, whether that was deliberate or not only you know. The implication was that 15 SR was pointless, which it most definitely was not, even though you now seem to have expressed the opinion that HQ 15SR was pointless and the troops should have been in a different CoC.

I agree that 'MS' was a knob, but he was not supposed to be across the duties for which he got sanctioned, even though they were theoretically on his chit. That is a different conversation, for which ARRSE is not the right venue.

My understanding was that MS had only been in post a few days when the bombing occurred. That would appear to be duff info, although perhaps I am conflating your knowledge of him in his/my/your recent/current posting at the time.
 
Not sure this is the right thread - but I've just clocked (on Amazon Kindle for less than 2 quid) "Undercover War: Britain's Special Forces and their secret battle against the IRA" by Harry McCallion.

Is it worth a coupla quid, or is it 9 carat bullenscheisse?

I have the hard back copy. I have only had a quick look through it at the moment, but it seems OK. Its not a big book.
 
Not sure this is the right thread - but I've just clocked (on Amazon Kindle for less than 2 quid) "Undercover War: Britain's Special Forces and their secret battle against the IRA" by Harry McCallion.

Is it worth a coupla quid, or is it 9 carat bullenscheisse?

Save your dosh. Not quite 9 carat as you remark more in the 1 carat. I have no idea why a gent of his calibre would produce such 'Sun' levels of proported 'fact'. His legal practise must be experiencing lean Covid times.
 
Save your dosh. Not quite 9 carat as you remark more in the 1 carat. I have no idea why a gent of his calibre would produce such 'Sun' levels of proported 'fact'. His legal practise must be experiencing lean Covid times.

He was a Lcpl in 2PARA and he was on my Junior Brecon in’75. A bit of a fantasist but came across as a tough character. Met him in the ‘Shot a while later as he was about to go to SA to join their “special forces”.

He’s done well for himself I suppose but still prone to story telling.
 
I believe I am right to say that many 40mm rounds were fired in the Province over time, but precious few if any in anger: accidental discharges, into the ground, before the fuse had travelled far enough to prime, triggered by blackthorn hedge branches, and impacting at the feet of the poor sod who happened to have a loaded M79 slung over his shoulder at the time, was the story as I remember it.

I'm sure it probably happened, every unit had it's cowboys.

SOP's that I operated under, M79 was carried unloaded, only to be loaded in the event of the sh!t hitting the fan.
 
Did they ever set them up over the border, and fire across?

Belleek RUC station, at one time was the most shot at Police Station in the Province.

A place called the Battery on the Irish side of the river Erne looked down and into the RUC station. Ballyshannon's finest marksmen liked to zero their sights using the Station as a target :) :)
 
Not sure this is the right thread - but I've just clocked (on Amazon Kindle for less than 2 quid) "Undercover War: Britain's Special Forces and their secret battle against the IRA" by Harry McCallion.

Is it worth a coupla quid, or is it 9 carat bullenscheisse?

He has been interviewed on several occasions about his role in Ballymurphy, if I am not wrong he may be the origin of the story of the skull being used as an ashtray, that was dismissed by other posters here in another thread.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Save your dosh. Not quite 9 carat as you remark more in the 1 carat. I have no idea why a gent of his calibre would produce such 'Sun' levels of proported 'fact'. His legal practise must be experiencing lean Covid times.
That mortgage won't pay itself.
 
You mean 21 Log Sup Regt RLC...? At least that's what my leaving gift said.
Sprog.

Pre '93 it was 21 (NI) Tpt & Mov Regt RCT. Then 21 Log Sp Regt RLC, then NI CSS Regt.

That's how my fuddled brain remembers it anyway!
 
Sprog.

Pre '93 it was 21 (NI) Tpt & Mov Regt RCT. Then 21 Log Sp Regt RLC, then NI CSS Regt.

That's how my fuddled brain remembers it anyway!

It was a very diverse regiment once the RLC kicked in.
 

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