Scariest place in NI?

ROMFT

Old-Salt
I agree with you 100% but no side without blame among the people, I believe the british and irish governments were still massive enemys in the forties, fifties,sixties and seventys and both goverments would not lose face. Do not blame the people for this, its the politicians that held the cards.
Have to disagree, there was (is still ?) a very vicious hate running between the 2 communities, I never, even as a child, blamed the ordinary squaddies, got one for a brother in law who became my best friend to this day, eventually joined the RN myself.
But as a kid in Belfast I felt, sometimes literally, the mindless hate directed at me from the orange men because of what i was (or what they supposed i was) & not who i was.
I had no doubt, even as a kid, that they would kill me, preferably slowly, if they could get away with it.

Edit. :crash:
 
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Have to disagree, there was (is still ?) a very vicious hate running between the 2 communities, I never, even as a child, blamed the ordinary squaddies, got one for a brother in law who became my best friend to this day, eventually joined the RN myself.
But as a kid in Belfast I felt, sometimes literally, the mindless hate directed at me from the orange men because of what i was (or what they supposed i was) & not who i was.
I had no doubt, even as a kid, that they would kill me, preferably slowly, if they could get away with it.

Edit. :crash:
Completed numerous tours from the early years on. Put away a bunch of 'Players' - many of whom had tried to kill me and those I was with. Point is although we pursued, tracked down, harried relentlessly, put the frighteners on, shot (if we got lucky), locked them up, it was never done out of hatred...it was a job.. and, strange as it sounds, one I enjoyed...it beat the more mundane aspects of soldiering in the UK and BAOR.

I served in a Scottish regiment, we were uncommonly like those Ulster folk... Catholic and Protestant... though didn't identify with either, most of our Jocks were pretty tough characters... brutal and licentious MOW..though most had an innate sense of fair play, invariably empathized with those in their TAOR, had a soft spot for dogs and kids, flirted with the young women (even in 'hard core' areas... and it was often reciprocated), were courteous to older women, polite to guys who gave us no trouble...though woe betide the assholes... that's the way it was.

During my tours I often reflected on the trauma children growing up in those violent areas experienced, the recurring nightmares (probably because I had children of my own safe at home), the hatred and fear instilled in their receptive young minds by propaganda, apprehension, and the surreality surrounding their lives.
You have given me an insight...after all these years.

XXV
 
Completed numerous tours from the early years on. Put away a bunch of 'Players' - many of whom had tried to kill me and those I was with. Point is although we pursued, tracked down, harried relentlessly, put the frighteners on, shot (if we got lucky), locked them up, it was never done out of hatred...it was a job.. and, strange as it sounds, one I enjoyed...it beat the more mundane aspects of soldiering in the UK and BAOR.

I served in a Scottish regiment, we were uncommonly like those Ulster folk... Catholic and Protestant... though didn't identify with either, most of our Jocks were pretty tough characters... brutal and licentious MOW..though most had an innate sense of fair play, invariably empathized with those in their TAOR, had a soft spot for dogs and kids, flirted with the young women (even in 'hard core' areas... and it was often reciprocated), were courteous to older women, polite to guys who gave us no trouble...though woe betide the assholes... that's the way it was.

During my tours I often reflected on the trauma children growing up in those violent areas experienced, the recurring nightmares (probably because I had children of my own safe at home), the hatred and fear instilled in their receptive young minds by propaganda, apprehension, and the surreality surrounding their lives.
You have given me an insight...after all these years.

XXV
Apparently Ulster was a bit of a sexual paradise for squaddies before 1969 with the women outnumbering men. A Staff Sergeant was telling me he went on some Kape type tour in 1966 and was based in Palace Barracks, Hollywood there were women lined up waiting to get into the barracks on a disco night.

Compared to their own menfolk English squaddies appeared charming, sophistcated and good looking. Something you Jocks sadly don't posses, although you are fine people and great soldiers.
 
Compared to their own menfolk English squaddies appeared charming, sophistcated and good looking.
It had more to do with having a job and money. Few of these girls ever survived long stays away from NI and their 'mammys'.
 

Sgt_Steiner

War Hero
A duplicitous character who spoke out of both sides of his mouth... you're quoting one interview... he tried to be all things to all people... undoubtedly an intelligent man... real name Rory O' Brady.
Why take issue with the Gaelic? It doesn't exactly strengthen your argument.
 
I grew up in one of the houses just across the street from there. I was in the mobile library at the top of the street when it happened, didn't hear a thing, 15 year old me toddles home down the street with a new book thinking... Hey, it's all gone very quiet, where is everybody ?

As I get home I'm followed to the door by some booties who seemed to think that our piss-poor 1 parent family was somehow involved, ripping our home apart to find the non-existent weapons. Funnily enough my mother had received threats for being friendly to the soldiers & even making them pots of tea when they "patrolled" by hiding in the ally behind our house.
They never caught the PIRA responsible but took me & my brother to the barracks where i got slapped around by a young bootie (was that you ? :mrgreen:) then some more by a rather drunk (vodka by the smell of it) RUC cnut who threatened to have my name put on a UFF death list.

Ah, I do miss being young.
No, the Marines took over from my unit sometime later.
 
Apparently Ulster was a bit of a sexual paradise for squaddies before 1969 with the women outnumbering men. A Staff Sergeant was telling me he went on some Kape type tour in 1966 and was based in Palace Barracks, Hollywood there were women lined up waiting to get into the barracks on a disco night.

Compared to their own menfolk English squaddies appeared charming, sophistcated and good looking. Something you Jocks sadly don't posses, although you are fine people and great soldiers.
From what I have been told the Palace Barracks disco was quite scarey... ;-)
 
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When I joined my battalion there were many wives from the Creggan.
It had more to do with having a job and money. Few of these girls ever survived long stays away from NI and their 'mammys'.
I joined my old lot in Cyprus, they had done two years at Ballykelly before that. Most were from Coleraine and Limavady etc, and seemed to have known each other before marrying into the battalion. They liked Cyprus, Canterbury and Catterick not so much.
 

RedDinger

Clanker
I think you will find an awful lot of us openly carried outside of bases, we'd look a bit silly patrolling without them really.
I went to a lot of places not patrolling and was always armed.
 
Go on then General, surprise me. Seriously, I'm up for a laugh.

From where I sit, literally, you've got a better chance of winning Euromillions than ever ordering me around.

The scariest place in NI appears to be your fevered imagination.
I was speaking for my wife, you will obey. Can you not undestand satire.
 
Go on then General, surprise me. Seriously, I'm up for a laugh.

From where I sit, literally, you've got a better chance of winning Euromillions than ever ordering me around.

The scariest place in NI appears to be your fevered imagination.
I was speaking for my wife, you will obey. Can you not undestand satire.
I think you will find an awful lot of us openly carried outside of bases, we'd look a bit silly patrolling without them really.
You stupid little ****, you seem to be indicating that you sat in pubs tooled up but you can cut and paste parts of the conversation to suit your story. It was not the norm for people to sit in civies with a visible weapon in Northern Ireland.
 

ROMFT

Old-Salt
Back to the subject of alcohol.
Several months later (see previous experience), cutting through an alley, or entry as we called them, on the way home, I stumbled across a foot patrol of some English regiment or other, occupying a garage door corner space, intent on not going anywhere but sitting supping whisky.
Come here kid they said, I expected a grilling but instead they wanted me to share their party.
An hour or more later i found my way home minging & puked up for the first time in my life.
My mum wasn't impressed, bloody soldiers, if i find out which one's it was :mrgreen:

I couldn't even stand the smell of whisky for a good 10+ years after that without wanting to throw up.
 
Have to disagree, there was (is still ?) a very vicious hate running between the 2 communities, I never, even as a child, blamed the ordinary squaddies, got one for a brother in law who became my best friend to this day, eventually joined the RN myself.
But as a kid in Belfast I felt, sometimes literally, the mindless hate directed at me from the orange men because of what i was (or what they supposed i was) & not who i was.
I had no doubt, even as a kid, that they would kill me, preferably slowly, if they could get away with it.

Edit. :crash:
Oh I may have not said enough, It maybe could have been dealt with in the 60's or 70's when smarter minds prevailed but nobody thought to deal with it. If some smart minds had come together it could have been different. My dad was part time UDR from its formation until 1985 and there were a few issues relating to his full time job that could have caused him harm but one thing both him and I will and I am certain of this called anybody a derogetory catholic name. I served and done back to back tours of Iraq and one of the most funny people I have ever met in my my life was a catholic PO from Derry, im saying Derry out of respect for him. We all took our malaria weekly tablet on a Monday and that made you have weird dreams and PO K**** after sick parade on a Tuesday done dream interpitation and It was some of the most fun I have ever heard.
 
Oh I may have not said enough, It maybe could have been dealt with in the 60's or 70's when smarter minds prevailed but nobody thought to deal with it. If some smart minds had come together it could have been different. My dad was part time UDR from its formation until 1985 and there were a few issues relating to his full time job that could have caused him harm but one thing both him and I will and I am certain of this called anybody a derogetory catholic name. I served and done back to back tours of Iraq and one of the most funny people I have ever met in my my life was a catholic PO from Derry, im saying Derry out of respect for him. We all took our malaria weekly tablet on a Monday and that made you have weird dreams and PO K**** after sick parade on a Tuesday done dream interpitation and It was some of the most fun I have ever heard.
Why, I wonder, did the Brits switch from daily paludrine (no side effects) to the weekly pill that caused folk to hallucinate and feel ill? In my day one liked to be in complete control of one's faculties, especially on operations!!
 

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