Scariest place in NI?

You have a a stange idea of who I am but I will tell you what I am more likely to be ordering you around than you think.
Go on then General, surprise me. Seriously, I'm up for a laugh.

From where I sit, literally, you've got a better chance of winning Euromillions than ever ordering me around.

The scariest place in NI appears to be your fevered imagination.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
I have aspirations of much more than that and me my wife and my son have made many outings in the past 2 weeks now that I have been allowed due to certain aspects of shieilding being lifted.
You're a dreamer, totally and utterly. You sit there on night-shift bored out of your skull and writing garbage on ARRSE from your grim surroundings.

Trying to tell people such as @Banker that you have some sort of power is truly absurd. Your aspirations for the future comprise going out with your wife and child, yet you spout messages of hate going back hundreds of years.

You're delusional, get help - that's the best interaction I can manage with you.
 
Most certainly so.
My bad, it seemed to make sense in my head at the time, but I was asking if by leveling the playing field you meant that the Masonic lodges are behind a drive for trust between Prods and catholics?If so, it doesn't appear to be replicated in the Orange, where at best it's tolerance, in my experience.
 
My bad, it seemed to make sense in my head at the time, but I was asking if by leveling the playing field you meant that the Masonic lodges are behind a drive for trust between Prods and catholics?If so, it doesn't appear to be replicated in the Orange, where at best it's tolerance, in my experience.
The Masonic Lodges don't have to drive anything as you describe. As with Scotland, Ireland has it's own Masonic history. Many of Ireland's great political figures were Freemasons, subsequently obliged to bow out of the fraternity when the Pope stated that he would disenfranchise RC's belonging to it.

I can't comment on the Orange Order and their ethos as I'm not a member.
 

Sgt_Steiner

War Hero
I had the misfortune to get canned Irish whisky in Iraq, it smelled ok and it tasted just alright but probabbly one of the worst hangovers I have ever had but needs must. Around the same time I had reason to meet the biggest bunch of cnuts in the British Army and that was 2LI circa 2003/2004. Never had a bad word to say about any unit I ever met but in 19 years of TA service but them.
Why?
 

Stabwedge

Clanker
I used to patrol the quarries prior to RUC arriving with the "specialist products" ;)
We used to see some units cooking on disposable BBQs during the summer months in later years! The smell drove us mad.

(I’ve been out of the industry a few years but ‘We’ is as specific as I’ll get on here. ;))
 
The Masonic Lodges don't have to drive anything as you describe. As with Scotland, Ireland has it's own Masonic history. Many of Ireland's great political figures were Freemasons, subsequently obliged to bow out of the fraternity when the Pope stated that he would disenfranchise RC's belonging to it.

I can't comment on the Orange Order and their ethos as I'm not a member.
In all seriousness, I found the contributions of "Choyaa" on the Slugger O'Toole blog very enlightening as to the actual mechanics of the Order. The way they do things explains a lot to me about why they do particular things. Its more of a collective habit than an organisation really.



I'd specifically recommend these articles below but he's quite an interesting writer so his other stuff might be worth a bash (although I have not read it).








Edited to arrange the links in the proper order.
 
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Sgt_Steiner

War Hero
I think RUC Toomebridge was the last terrorist attack before the second (maybe first) ceasefire? There was a badly plastered patch on the wall from an RPG strike. Thinking back now it must not of exploded on impact as the patch wasn't that large.
I remember seeing that circa 1999
 
Mortars are Gods in the Reg. Fact. ;)
Doing a mortar baseplate check however, is shit.

I worried more in the towns and villages than I did out in the cuds. Dunno why. The closeness of everything I guess compared with the internal mantra "they cant boobytrap every hedgerow and barbed wire fence...can they?"
Just remember the Winthrop theory!
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Only the Irish would use a 379 year old excuse and consider it entirely sensible.
When we spoke with the local Community Society members on the streets of Ulster, they never took any notes, they could remember back 'word for word' over 600 years.
 

Guns

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer

ROMFT

Old-Salt
It was all dangerous.

In June 1977, a PIRA team took over a house which overlooked the front gate of Andersonstown Police station. They held the family hostage while they waited in the upper front bedroom for a target. When an RUC vehicle slowed to drive into the station the players opened fire seriously injuring an RUC man. The firing only lasted 15-20 seconds but most of it was full automatic fire (I have a newspaper cutting on this incident somewhere).

Five minutes earlier my brick had paused for a minute on the corner outside the house, in full view of the gunmen, while the brick comd checked in Coy HQ on the radio. We had only gone 400 yards further on when they opened fire on the police station.

In that one tour my Bn had two soldiers shot (neither fatally), but my company had over 100 injuries recorded in the med centre for injuries recieved in riots and bombings (broken bones, concussion, perforated eardrums and God knows how many cuts etc requiring stitches). One riot saw 25% of my platoon casevaced out in the space of an hour.

I did two tours, many lads did a lot more. They were all dangerous.

The best way to find out what it was like for those on the ground is to read the books by Ken Wharton.

Ken Wharton on Amazon...
I grew up in one of the houses just across the street from there. I was in the mobile library at the top of the street when it happened, didn't hear a thing, 15 year old me toddles home down the street with a new book thinking... Hey, it's all gone very quiet, where is everybody ?

As I get home I'm followed to the door by some booties who seemed to think that our piss-poor 1 parent family was somehow involved, ripping our home apart to find the non-existent weapons. Funnily enough my mother had received threats for being friendly to the soldiers & even making them pots of tea when they "patrolled" by hiding in the ally behind our house.
They never caught the PIRA responsible but took me & my brother to the barracks where i got slapped around by a young bootie (was that you ? :mrgreen:) then some more by a rather drunk (vodka by the smell of it) RUC cnut who threatened to have my name put on a UFF death list.

Ah, I do miss being young.
 

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