Scariest place in NI?

The lockdown has me listening to Mrs Kinch a lot more.......I mean there is no escape so it has become almost obligatory. I have realized that she isn't actually moaning, its more a series of 'suggestions' which, in the cold light of a long lockdown day, is no bad thing per se. However, I have further realized that the next suggestion, often a supplementary additive to the previous suggestion, is either an unintentional, perhaps hormonic irritation that prevents me from being able to internalise the first suggestion and subject it to a proper SWAT analysis with the result that by supplementary suggestion number four I AM BEING DRIVEN FCUKING NUTS!
SWAT? It used to be SWOT, for Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities and Threats.

SWOT
 
Relieved a company of 1RGJ commanded by (then) Major Ian Corden-Lloyd in Andytown late '72, the operational handover was one of the best I experienced... the information imparted, the good humour, friendliness and hospitality shown to us members of our advance party of impetuous and impatient Jocks... superb - and indicative of a very professional outfit. Ian Corden-Lloyd, in the short time I knew him, struck me as a very fine Officer indeed.
Is one of four post WW2 senior officers commemorated together in the chapel at Sandhurst.
The others (from memory) are David Blair, H Jones and Rupert Thorneloe.
 
Last edited:
Vaguely seem to recall what had been intended as a US Airforce base - wouldn't surprise me if it was utilised for other purposes. I think I have a drawing of the layout somewhere.
No mate that mock spanish was the only time i ever heard that.
It was at prison training college and i never forgot that
 
No mate that mock spanish was the only time i ever heard that.
It was at prison training college and i never forgot that
Yes I have heard of a type of borstal in the area, but not much else. I can't remember where I came across it, I think I was in Saudi - it is quite funny when you type it all in one block of text and ask someone to say it with a Spanish accent. I am quite good with accents and thought I was being s clever running it off like onion johnney - took me a bit to figure it out......felt dumb!
 
Relieved a company of 1RGJ commanded by (then) Major Ian Corden-Lloyd in Andytown late '72, the operational handover was one of the best I experienced... the information imparted, the good humour, friendliness and hospitality shown to us members of our advance party of impetuous and impatient Jocks... superb - and indicative of a very professional outfit. Ian Corden-Lloyd, in the short time I knew him, struck me as a very fine Officer indeed.
I think he left as a Lt Colonel but Captain Philip Schofield (at the time) was a casualty in the chopper, he was the Adjutant of 1 RGJ at the time. He recently made a bit of a social media storm by wearing his monocle on the underground!

He was incredibly kind to my middle son a number of years ago when walking the Camino, Philip was in the company of a Lt General and a Guards Colonel who taught my son how to tie his boots properly and regaled him with tails before they parted company for one of their regular long lunches. A true gentleman who was very badly injured and still carries many scars from his trip through the front of the chopper!
 
Last edited:

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Yeh, not unusual in Gazelle crashes for the two front-seaters to find themselves outside the aircraft still strapped into their seats!
Often better than being stuck inside.
 
Yeh, not unusual in Gazelle crashes for the two front-seaters to find themselves outside the aircraft still strapped into their seats!
So it is possible to have ejector seats in choppers!
 
I think he left as a Lt Colonel but Captain Philip Schofield (at the time) was a casualty in the chopper, he was the Adjutant of 1 RGJ at the time. He recently made a bit of a social media storm by wearing his monocle on the underground!

He was incredibly kind to my middle son a number of years ago when walking the Camino, Philip he was in the company of a Lt General and a Guards Colonel who taught my son how to tie his boots properly and regaled him with tails before they parted company for one of their regular long lunches. A true gentleman who was very badly injured and still carries many scars from his trip through the front of the chopper!
Looks like a cushion to support a dodgy lower back
 

Actingunpaid

Old-Salt
After much thought,scariest place for me was Belfast docks,having just survived a rather rough night-crossing from Liverpool.Had only been in six months so was a clueless sprog (I know,'you still are').Too busy to think about it afterwards
 
I think he left as a Lt Colonel but Captain Philip Schofield (at the time) was a casualty in the chopper, he was the Adjutant of 1 RGJ at the time. He recently made a bit of a social media storm by wearing his monocle on the underground!

He was incredibly kind to my middle son a number of years ago when walking the Camino, Philip was in the company of a Lt General and a Guards Colonel who taught my son how to tie his boots properly and regaled him with tails before they parted company for one of their regular long lunches. A true gentleman who was very badly injured and still carries many scars from his trip through the front of the chopper!
Lovely story there. Le Camino is on my horizon now that I've just retired.
 
Woulda been more risky a few years later.

One of my mates in 8 Bde HQ got DVLA to check ownership of all the Husky vans in NI.

Only one of them was not registered to MOD.
I doubt DVLA had anything to do with it.

V Tp 233 Sig Sqn perhaps!
 

Latest Threads

Top