Scanning of slides and prints

Discussion in 'Photography' started by TaffJ, Aug 23, 2011.

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  1. In the near future I will set about scanning my Dad's thousands of colour slides onto either a hard drive or discs and all my colour and b & w prints to the same.

    The question is, is it worth while buying a dedicated scanner for each format or are those scanners that I have seen advertised that do both slides and prints any good? Hopefully someone with a experience of scanning will be able to help.

    I think there will be at least 5000 colour slides from my Dad and probably 2500 prints from me so it will have to be a fairly robust machine.

    When I buy things I usually stick to the premise that it is wise to buy the best you can afford at the time so although I will not be scrimping I will also not be spending money like a drunk sailor either.
  2. I think, these day,s most regular scanners are upto the job - even these combined printer/scanner jobs. What you will probably need is a graphics application, such as GIMP, to correct any colour issues with the slides. IIRC, there are plugin filters for GIMP to deal with standard slide films, such as Kodak, Afga and so on. You can also use it to despeckle scanned photos.

    We have bogstandard HP Photosmart C4530 printer/scanner. Scans upto 1200 dpi. That way, if you need to reprint a photo, using a resolution of say 300 dpi, you get a decent enough copy. Using a specific phot ink cartridge produces marginally better prints when compared to the regular colour ink one, but not so that most folk would notice.
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  3. Good luck. Don't be fooled by claims for flatbed scanners, they are not good for film. Essential for prints of course. Try and get a 2nd hand Nikon CoolScan LS4000/5000 or better 8000/9000 if you are looking for high quality neg/pos colour scans. Note that these are old machines and Nikon software will not work with newer OS like Mac 10.5 +. You could try VueScan, which is great with flatbeds for prints. Note filmscans of B&W negs are incredibly problematic, as they pick up on any minute fleck of dust or scratch. Just a note on time, using Mac OS 10.4 with Nikon Coolscan software and scanning images at 4000dpi in TiFF, it is taking me about day to scan a couple of rolls of film [72 images].
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  4. one of my son's bought a Nikon neg/slide scanner, it cost about £500 and was superb at
    the job.

    Job jobbed, he put it on EBay and got a lot of his outlay back.

    Wouldn't even hang on for me to have a go wuth it , the bugger.
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  5. Grumblegrunt

    Grumblegrunt LE Book Reviewer

    the inlaws are sticking all their slides on digi using a scanner and they dont have to be that expensive. you could allways stick them in a projector with a camera on a tripod and do it that way :)

    it is time consuming though
  6. I had mixed results with a Minolta scanner recently. Make sure the slides are as clean as you can get them. Scanners have the uncanny ability to pick up any specks or marks.
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  7. About to add to whatever confusion already exists:

    I bought an Epson Perfection 4990 Photo scanner about 5 years ago. It scans up to 9600 dpi which you will definitely need for high resolution results from slides and negs. I had brilliant results from it until a few weeks ago when it suddenly went tits up - I now need to get it repaired. Nevertheless, I think you'd get good results for an outlay of possibly up to £300 for something in this range.
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