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SBS Miniature Submarines dangerous to SBS

I'm pretty sure the one's in bold aren't Mini-sub related, I bet a load of the others listed ain't.

Still, quite a lot of injuries and deaths.

...it's almost as though being a frogman/submariner/military diver/special forces commando isn't the safest job on the earth?

Im not sure how many of the ones related to the equipment are attributable to the equipment
Im not convinced crashed into a trawler is indicative of poor design
 
Pre mini subs their was a similar incident on one of the O boats in a Scottish lough when the sub encountered a pocket of fresh water and lost depth. IIRC two lads perished then.

Referred to in Don Camsell’s book, Black Water, and also in another book, the name of which escapes me, by one of the officers of the boats crew.
 
To the uninitiated, how does losing depth cause issues? I would have thought gaining depth would be the killer.
"Losing depth control" would be the full expression. Its not used in the same way as "losing height" would be in aviation.

ETA Sudden depth decrease is dangerous in certain circumstances, as is sudden depth increase.
 
"Losing depth control" would be the full expression. Its not used in the same way as "losing height" would be in aviation.

ETA Sudden depth decrease is dangerous in certain circumstances, as is sudden depth increase.
Good point. Looking at the Bends and gas embolisms then. Not good.
 
I'm no rocket scientist, and I know almost nothing of SF Ops.

But at a rough guess, I'd hazard a guess at "being in the Special Boat Service is dangerous" and leave it at that. Other than getting wasted in the Jolly Sailor on Poole Quay, everything they do is flipping dangerous.

Not really how risk assessment works :mrgreen:
 
Referred to in Don Camsell’s book, Black Water, and also in another book, the name of which escapes me, by one of the officers of the boats crew.

This incident is also mentioned in First into Action by Duncan Falconer (SBS), very insightful book, well worth a read if your interested in the SBS etc
 
To the uninitiated, how does losing depth cause issues? I would have thought gaining depth would be the killer.

I believe it's to do with the relative density of fresh v salt water. i.e, sub is merrily holding a depth of 75 ft in salt water, hits a patch of fresh and subsequently plummets. I read that in the incident refered to the guys were on the casing and on umbilical breathing apparatus, lost grip and were deep enough to be negatively bouyant and ... sunk.

******* hideous.

although I do appreciate the pendantry of the original observation. Good work.
 

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