Save Shambo!

#1
The Hindu council of the GB has stated that it will coach Hindus in to form a human chain around this TB ridden cow to prevent Vets from putting it down.

Stating their religious rights over UK law.

Cow Link

Human Chain
 
#3
all of the Hindus? If so, is it all of the ones in the world or just the UK? Could really do with specifics just so we know how many Hindu's aare kicking off.
 
#4
Easy solution, leave the cow alone and kill all the Hindus. Once all the Hindus are gone kill the cow and feed it to the muslims.
 
#5
I sympathise with the Hindus, but as bovine TB is infectious and can affect humans as well as cattle that's the end of the story. They should all be able to remember FMD and the effects of allowing a disease to become endemic.
 
#6
http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk/0100...objectid=19072786&siteid=50082-name_page.html

HINDUS from around Britain are threatening to form a human chain to prevent the slaughter of a bull they regard as sacred after it tested positive for bovine tuberculosis, it was revealed today.

The bull, called Shambo, which is kept by the Skandavale Temple in Llanpumsaint, Carmarthen, south west Wales, has been issued with a slaughter notice after a routine bovine TB test.

The Hindu Forum of Britain has called on Environment Secretary David Miliband to prevent the slaughter and said if necessary it will form a human chain around the temple to prevent the killing.

The bull, which Hindu chiefs said is in a “very healthy” condition, has been put in isolation in a specially-constructed shrine within the main temple since it tested positive.

The temple has promised to keep the animal, which will never enter the food chain, in isolation for the rest of its life but requests for a reprieve have been rejected.
Bit of a quandary this....I say spare the poor beast!

Save Shambo!
 
#7
Is that Sean connery speak for a black person?????
 
#8
For fcuk's sake, religious nuts just need to get a grip on reality.

TB Cow + Cows + People = TB outbreak.

Oh no, sorry, I'm a hardline Catholic that's gotten AIDS via a blood transfusion. But I want a wife and kids, but I can't use a condom, so my wife and kids are going to have to have AIDS. Sorry, but it's against my religion to use condoms.
 
#9
**** EM - they will be the first to die then just torch the place once they are dead... infact just torch the place anyway...if they dont like it they can go back to their 3rd world poverty stricken shit holes
 
#10
This community in Wales - for people of all faiths and none, incidentally - is one I know a bit about, as a family member is a former senior community member.

The quiet, devoted people who compose it are very well-liked and highly respected locally; and their views on this proposed precautionary cull shouldn't be dismissed outright.

To avoid harming genuinely-held religious scruples and sensibilities, I'd say this was one for the govt's veterinary experts. If they are satisfiend that the TB-positive beast can be kept in isolation for the remainder of its days, and then its carcase disposed of hygienically, there should be no problems.

The location is in the heart of an agricultural area; and the vets - guided by local and community sentiment - should make the judgement on epidemiological/infectivity grounds. If the animal is suffering, or is likely to suffer, there is no reason why this community can't be persuaded that euthanasia is merely a humane way of hastening the inevitable.

Aside from the ethical question, it remains to be seen how an animal in this isolated community became infected with TB. I'd place a very sizeable bet on badgers, of which we have far, far too many . . . . . .
 
#12
caubeen said:
This community in Wales - for people of all faiths and none, incidentally - is one I know a bit about, as a family member is a former senior community member.

The quiet, devoted people who compose it are very well-liked and highly respected locally; and their views on this proposed precautionary cull shouldn't be dismissed outright.

To avoid harming genuinely-held religious scruples and sensibilities, I'd say this was one for the govt's veterinary experts. If they are satisfiend that the TB-positive beast can be kept in isolation for the remainder of its days, and then its carcase disposed of hygienically, there should be no problems.

The location is in the heart of an agricultural area; and the vets - guided by local and community sentiment - should make the judgement on epidemiological/infectivity grounds. If the animal is suffering, or is likely to suffer, there is no reason why this community can't be persuaded that euthanasia is merely a humane way of hastening the inevitable.

Aside from the ethical question, it remains to be seen how an animal in this isolated community became infected with TB. I'd place a very sizeable bet on badgers, of which we have far, far too many . . . . . .
Lets kill a few foxes whilst we are at it shall we - your last paragraph was bollo* infact the bit about religion is absoloutly bollo* we live in a society that the majority have no interest in a story embellished by time despite what religion you follow as its all shite
 
#13
Oh I forgot to mention do Hindu's as a matter of course all qualify as vets during their lives......didnt think so...religion sticking its unwanted nose in something it has no idea what its talking about...now I have reached 200 posts I am off to watch Apprentice when it comes on
 
#14
caubeen said:
To avoid harming genuinely-held religious scruples and sensibilities, I'd say this was one for the govt's veterinary experts.
Given the massive overkill (pun entirely intended) over FMD, I'd guess not too many farmers would trust the Men From the Ministry to know a sick animal when they got sneezed on. If this decision is going to be down to DEFRA, I'd look for a re-enactment of the Great Mutiny in South Wales. :D
 
#18
chimp503 said:
caubeen said:
This community in Wales - for people of all faiths and none, incidentally - is one I know a bit about, as a family member is a former senior community member.

The quiet, devoted people who compose it are very well-liked and highly respected locally; and their views on this proposed precautionary cull shouldn't be dismissed outright.

To avoid harming genuinely-held religious scruples and sensibilities, I'd say this was one for the govt's veterinary experts. If they are satisfiend that the TB-positive beast can be kept in isolation for the remainder of its days, and then its carcase disposed of hygienically, there should be no problems.

The location is in the heart of an agricultural area; and the vets - guided by local and community sentiment - should make the judgement on epidemiological/infectivity grounds. If the animal is suffering, or is likely to suffer, there is no reason why this community can't be persuaded that euthanasia is merely a humane way of hastening the inevitable.

Aside from the ethical question, it remains to be seen how an animal in this isolated community became infected with TB. I'd place a very sizeable bet on badgers, of which we have far, far too many . . . . . .
Lets kill a few foxes whilst we are at it shall we - your last paragraph was bollo* infact the bit about religion is absoloutly bollo* we live in a society that the majority have no interest in a story embellished by time despite what religion you follow as its all shite
We live in a society which respects the right to religious freedom. If a particualr group is doing something misguided and potentially dangerous, it is for the rest of society to point out the error of their ways in a sensible way.

Yes, lets kill foxes. You can shoot as many of them as you like, you know. Ask any farmer or pest control officer in London.

Have a great time watching the Apprentice. I wonder if he would hire you. Apply, and give us all a laugh.
 
#19
chimp503 said:
caubeen said:
This community in Wales - for people of all faiths and none, incidentally - is one I know a bit about, as a family member is a former senior community member.

The quiet, devoted people who compose it are very well-liked and highly respected locally; and their views on this proposed precautionary cull shouldn't be dismissed outright.

To avoid harming genuinely-held religious scruples and sensibilities, I'd say this was one for the govt's veterinary experts. If they are satisfiend that the TB-positive beast can be kept in isolation for the remainder of its days, and then its carcase disposed of hygienically, there should be no problems.

The location is in the heart of an agricultural area; and the vets - guided by local and community sentiment - should make the judgement on epidemiological/infectivity grounds. If the animal is suffering, or is likely to suffer, there is no reason why this community can't be persuaded that euthanasia is merely a humane way of hastening the inevitable.

Aside from the ethical question, it remains to be seen how an animal in this isolated community became infected with TB. I'd place a very sizeable bet on badgers, of which we have far, far too many . . . . . .
Lets kill a few foxes whilst we are at it shall we - your last paragraph was bollo* infact the bit about religion is absoloutly bollo* we live in a society that the majority have no interest in a story embellished by time despite what religion you follow as its all shite
Your grounds for dismissing (a) badgers, and (b) religion are what, exactly?

This whole story boils down to TB, badgers and religious beliefs.
 
#20
THIS IS NOT A RELIGIOUS ISSUE.

The law is the law and the Cow is infected with TB.

Stop Now, Stop bending over for the rest of the World who live in the UK. If you are in the UK you (and your animals) are subject to UK Law!

:x :x :x :x :x :x :x :x :x :x :x :x
 

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