Sausages and Bacon

Don’t let Joker see that last pic. He will hunt you down and spatula you to death.
 
Sausages next.

The kit was only a fiver. It’s got a sausage making making press thing, collagen sausage casings and 3 different mixes (Cumberland, old English and Lincolnshire) to add to minced pork. Also supplied are rubber gloves.

Now these have a lot to live up to. I’m not just saying this cos it’s our gaff, but our sausages at the pub are without a doubt the best I’ve ever had. We spent a good few months tinkering to get the recipe right, before eventually settling on our current one. We’ve been open 12 years now and this recipe has stood the test of time.

I fondly recall sitting round the kitchen table trying different ones and picking the best. Our flash as ****, ex VIP hospitality pub head chef, going up against Wendy, the in law’s family cook.

Wendy’s recipe was better and what we have now is an evolution of her’s.

One thing I learned from this process is that you need mince with a decent fat content or the sausages will be dry and nasty.

So, this recipe calls for a kilo of mince, 300ml of water plus one packet of mix.

The mix looks and smells like Paxo stuffing mixture. It’s got rusk, breadcrumbs and all sorts of other things in there, things that I know our pub sausages don’t contain.

We’ll see how they turn out.

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It's definitely old, sitting in your pantry forever, but how can they call it "Old English" when they haven't included sawdust?

The number for Trading Standards is 0808 223 1133, if you've a need.
 
In goes the pork mince, water and mixture, I’ve gone for “Old English”. It gets mixed up by hand and loaded into the sausage maker.

Then you put the casing over the nozzle, tie a knot in the end and start turning the handle.

Simple as that.....

Well not that simple it turns out. The casing is too small to fit on the nozzle unless you completely unravel it.

As you put the meat in, pockets of air form leaving bubbles and saggy sausages. The casing splits a few times. As you twist it to make individual sausages, the previous sausage unravels.

It’s fiddly as ****.

Just as I’m getting the hang of it, the machine needs refilling with more meat leaving me with a half filled sausage.

I get there in the end. I’ve got 14 or 15 big fat sausages. 5 - 6” *******. I could’ve made 20 plus of I’d made them a bit more normal sized, but I wanted big ones.

I’ll save the Cumberland and Lincolnshire mixtures for another day.

I’ll report back in the morning on how they taste.
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Also, lose the collagen casing. Utter waste of time and only suitable for the cheap runny minced lips and arseholes in a tube things they sell to Kenyans.

Even the crappy budget supermarket boerewors in SA uses natural casings.
 
Also, lose the collagen casing. Utter waste of time and only suitable for the cheap runny minced lips and arseholes in a tube things they sell to Kenyans.

Even the crappy budget supermarket boerewors in SA uses natural casings.
They are also only "good" (as if they ever were) for about 2 years in storage... if we don't hear back from our intrepid explorer for a while we can safely assume he has expired from a violent 'rona infection of the bowels.
 
He's a matelot. Apparently they've been known to put some pretty disgusting things in their mouths.
 
You seriously think sailors are going to waste pigs' arseholes on sossinges, the dorrty cunts?
 
Some years back I was on a work course called “Presenting with confidence.”

It was basically DITs (defence instructional techniques) rebadged for civvies.

Anyway I fondly recalled that the best lecture / presentation I’d ever seen was at HMS Collingwood during my phase 2 training. This lad walked into the room, lobbed a brick through the window, which shattered into a thousand pieces, and then preceded to deliver a perfect lesson in how to glaze a window, demonstrating each step as he went along.

Not wishing to be outdone by some civvies, I decided my lecture on this course would be equally as good.

I decided to do it on Bacon Sandwiches.

I started the lecture by talking about sandwiches themselves and their history. We all know that the Earl of Sandwich coined the name. He was an excessive gambler who would spend days at the card table, getting up only to piss and shit. It’s well documented that he’d ask for “meat between two pieces of bread” so that his hands wouldn’t get greasy and get on the cards.

Others would then ask for their meat “like Sandwich had his” and the term stuck.

The origins actually go much further back. The first mention of putting something between two pieces of bread is in the first century BC when Hillel the Elder whacked his Passover lamb between two matzahs (unleavened bread) with some bitter herbs.

I’d argue that he actually invented the kebab, but the Jewish faith claims otherwise.

“This is a remembrance of Hillel in Temple times — this is what Hillel did when the Temple existed: He enwrapped the Paschal lamb, the matzo and the bitter herbs to eat them as one, in fulfillment of the verse, "with matzot and maror (the bitter herb) they shall eat it."

So let’s talk about bread. Bread is widely accepted as the oldest man made food in existence. Evidence exists of grain being pounded into flour from 30,000 years ago. It’s so important to us that it has even permeated into our language.

The Latin for bread is “Panis”, when combined with “com” the Latin for “with“, we get words like companion and company.

Literally meaning “those I have bread with.“

In this case I used a nice farmhouse loaf. I got one of the other course delegates to come up and cut the bread into slices while I continued yabbering on.

Normal sliced white bread, while a staple part of our diet, isn’t that great. It’s full of additives which keep it fresher for longer and other nasty stuff that speeds up the leavening process so manufacturers can make it quicker.

Also everyone loves real freshly baked bread.

So next up is the butter.

First delegate sits down, next volunteer comes up and starts spreading on the butter.

Again butter has been around for thousands of years. Hindu texts tell the story of Krishna stealing butter as a child in around 1500 - 2000BC.

It was a way keeping milk from spoiling and up until fairly recently l, was globally thought of as a peasant food. The Romans had a low opinion of butter for example and generally did not consume it.

In the 16th century, the Catholic Church made it acceptable to eat butter during lent and it immediately became popular with everyone. In Western Europe it quickly became the cooking fat of choice and was popular sauce when melted.

Of course I’m using real butter here, because margarine is a disgrace, it’s French and even insects won’t eat it.

Volunteer number 2 sits down.

Volunteer number 3 starts assembling the sandwiches using precooked bacon. (The plan was to cook it on a camping hob but the Health & Safety hoops were too big to jump through.

So the main event bacon.

Curing and smoking meat has always been a way of making food last for longer. The origins of bacon in its own right are unknown, but smoking or curing goes back thousands of years.

Of course we have a variety of different kinds in this day and age; back, streaky, dry cured, smoked, unsmoked.

All have their place in the world but in this case I used good quality dry cured bacon. Cheap stuff is usually injected with smoke flavouring and water to bulk it out. When you cook bacon, if there is a ton of liquid or white film in the pan, it’s cheap stuff.

Buying it is false economy, most of it is water and it all shrinks when you cook it.

Buy the good stuff.

I also talked a bit about animal welfare and farming here.

Finally I dished out the sarnies and offered everyone a choice of ketchup or Brown sauce.

So where does ketchup come from?

The word ketchup has its origin in the Amoy (Chinese) word for fish sauce “koi chap”.

As the name suggest it was originally made from fish. The Royal Navy most likely brought the recipe back to Europe and on to the colonies in the 16th or 17th century. Over the years it evolved into a thick sauce primarily made from mushrooms.

In fact there is no mention of ketchup containing tomatoes until the early 19th century. These early recipes generally contain anchovies, belying their origin as a fish sauce.

In 1876 F&J Heinz released their version of ketchup in the states and added a shit ton of sugar as a preservative. And so the sweet ketchup we know today was born.

Meanwhile back in Blighty a grocer called Fred Garton was knocking up his own ketchup using molasses and vinegar. As a marketing stunt he would tell people it’s what they served in the Houses of Parliament. In 1899 “HP” (Houses of Parliament) sauce was launched.

The end.

If you ever have to do public speaking, make sure everyone’s mouths are full so they can’t ask any questions.
It's an American program, but I think this documentary about sandwiches would make a good companion to this post. Yes, I can sit and watch an hour-long documentary about sandwiches.
 
IIRC the recipe for the houtskool boerewors I use is around 20-30% fat/spek.

Pofadder wors is even higher. It's the boerewors version of haggis without all that vegetarian shit in it.


 

Rab_C

War Hero
Rusk in Sosigs

The nutritional value is quite low and it has the capacity to absorb and swell 2 to 3 times it’s size with liquid and therefore used to “bulk” up the sausage mix. This is a great advantage when costing and calculating profit margins.
I have posted the reasoning on here before somewhere. For a good British banger rusk is required, I use rusk in my bangers but not things like Toulouse or merguez. I use it because it adds to texture, taste and how they cook. I use 5-10% pin head rusk.
 
With recognition of the incoming abuse....is it possible to make a low fat sausage that doesnt taste like one?

I pretty much eat everything in moderation so I am not too bothered but was interested if possible, we make meatballs which if using lean mince, breadcrumbs and egg is probably fairly low fat, do you add fat to sausages?
 

Rab_C

War Hero
With recognition of the incoming abuse....is it possible to make a low fat sausage that doesnt taste like one?

I pretty much eat everything in moderation so I am not too bothered but was interested if possible, we make meatballs which if using lean mince, breadcrumbs and egg is probably fairly low fat, do you add fat to sausages?
I grind my own pork and use shoulder and add belly pork to get the fat (fat=flavour). I guess you could cut down/out the fat and compensate with added seasoning. If you’re after a British style banger do try and get some rusk as opposed to breadcrumbs.
 
Going to be pretty dry though. May as well save yourself all that effort and just chuck a few lean steaks on the grill.
 
If you’re after a British style banger do try and get some rusk as opposed to breadcrumbs.
Rusk Recipe

454g Plain Flour
5 tsp Baking Powder
Good pinch of Salt
185 - 250ml Cold Water

Preheat oven to 220°c / Fan 210°c / Gas mark 8

  1. Sieve flour, baking powder and salt into large bowl
  2. Add cold water little at a time and bring together until a pliable dough is formed
  3. Roll out dough to a 15mm thick sheet
  4. Place rolled on a baking sheet lined with parchment
  5. Bake for 10 minutes and then
  6. Lower oven temperature to 190°c / Fan 180°c / Gas mark 5
  7. Slice part baked dough into 15mm strips and
  8. Place strips cut side up and return to oven for 5minutes and then
  9. Turn slices so bottom cut side is to top an cook for a further 5 minutes.
 

Oops

War Hero
Slow and inefficient isn't it?
Our Eastern Europeans wouldn't spit on their Mexicans...
Eta.
There are telly cameras covering every inch of a modern slaughter house nowadays, funnily enough nobody's terribly keen to show the 'Religious' bit !
 
With recognition of the incoming abuse....is it possible to make a low fat sausage that doesnt taste like one?

I pretty much eat everything in moderation so I am not too bothered but was interested if possible, we make meatballs which if using lean mince, breadcrumbs and egg is probably fairly low fat, do you add fat to sausages?
Fat digests slowly, therefore it curbs hunger and increases satiety. It also boosts your metabolism and keeps hormone levels up that you actually need to burn fat.

Eat fat to burn fat (and exercise, you lazy bastidge).
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
With recognition of the incoming abuse....is it possible to make a low fat sausage that doesnt taste like one?

I pretty much eat everything in moderation so I am not too bothered but was interested if possible, we make meatballs which if using lean mince, breadcrumbs and egg is probably fairly low fat, do you add fat to sausages?
Venison is fat free unless added but you often need to blanch them before cooking! I put 10 to 20% pork belly in my venison bangers with just salt and pepper to taste, they make a great breakfast banger
I have found that 100% fat free bangers are best cooked in a hot smoker
 

idlerx

Swinger
When I moved to this Norfolk village in 2002, the old butcher - renowned for his sausages - had just died. However, knowing a couple of pub mates who did Saturday jobs for him as lads, I found out that he used crushed digestive biscuit crumbs for the rusk element of his sausages. It works and comes in convenient quantities for home production. Now I just buy Hecks.
 
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