Sausages and Bacon

Never tried bacon curing but have done a few sosigs. These days though, it is Lorne Sausage... half lean beef with the other half a 50/50 mix of pork belly & pork shoulder home minced twice with home made rusk and various herb/spice additions.

Nice in a sandwich or in a brekkers with a fried egg and mushrooms etc.
 
I binned my old hand mincer after strapping it to the electric drill failed. Half a day winding out minced pork was no fun. Now got an electric with a sausage filling nozzle. I use half and half shoulder pork and boned/rinded belly. Loads of sage and bay In the garden. The only problem is that when people know I'm making, they disappear PDQ.
 
I’ve only got two cuts of pork belly, so I’ve gone for the Smokey one and the sweet one, the traditional one can wait for another day.

As described above. It just goes straight in the bag and then in the bottom of the fridge.

It’s been in about 4 hours now and you can already see quite a lot of liquid coming out of the meat.

It’s tempting to open the bag and discard this but the instruction specifically tell you not to.

So that’s it for the bacon until the middle of next week.

Next step is to get it out the bags, wash off all the cure mixture, then stick it in muslin bags (again supplied in the kit) and hang it in the fridge on hooks to dry out for a week.

As an accomplished smoker of meat, I’m also gonna give these a low temperature hickory smoke at the end.

Unsmoked bacon is the devil.
View attachment 488918View attachment 488919
Complicated process then. Is there no end to your talents?
 
I binned my old hand mincer after strapping it to the electric drill failed. Half a day winding out minced pork was no fun. Now got an electric with a sausage filling nozzle. I use half and half shoulder pork and boned/rinded belly. Loads of sage and bay In the garden. The only problem is that when people know I'm making, they disappear PDQ.
Disappear? I'd be hanging round like a bad smell, at the prospect of home made sausages
 
Now got an electric with a sausage filling nozzle.
I tried grinding the home made rusk with my electric one. Stripped the nylon gear. Happily though, I bought a bag of five replacement gears for next to bugger all from China.

These machines are, it seems, all the same under the expensive outer casing. Still, I can strip five more gears before I need worry again.

or simply put the rusk in a bag and smash it to pinhead size with a club hammer.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
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Le_addeur_noir

On ROPS
On ROPs
What it actually says is “20 days’ worth of sausages, at normal consumption rates. Fat cvnts may experience a shorter duration”.

And the pikey fvcker got it 50% off, it seems :)
20 days?. They would be lucky to last the firkin week here.
 

Rab_C

War Hero
@Ravers I’ve been making my own sausages for a while and my first bit of advice is ditch the collagen, hog casing is the only way to go (or lamb for small sausages).
521938C4-06EB-4955-AF58-333F29C954E2.jpeg
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Some years back I was on a work course called “Presenting with confidence.”

It was basically DITs (defence instructional techniques) rebadged for civvies.

Anyway I fondly recalled that the best lecture / presentation I’d ever seen was at HMS Collingwood during my phase 2 training. This lad walked into the room, lobbed a brick through the window, which shattered into a thousand pieces, and then preceded to deliver a perfect lesson in how to glaze a window, demonstrating each step as he went along.

Not wishing to be outdone by some civvies, I decided my lecture on this course would be equally as good.

I decided to do it on Bacon Sandwiches.

I started the lecture by talking about sandwiches themselves and their history. We all know that the Earl of Sandwich coined the name. He was an excessive gambler who would spend days at the card table, getting up only to piss and shit. It’s well documented that he’d ask for “meat between two pieces of bread” so that his hands wouldn’t get greasy and get on the cards.

Others would then ask for their meat “like Sandwich had his” and the term stuck.

The origins actually go much further back. The first mention of putting something between two pieces of bread is in the first century BC when Hillel the Elder whacked his Passover lamb between two matzahs (unleavened bread) with some bitter herbs.

I’d argue that he actually invented the kebab, but the Jewish faith claims otherwise.

“This is a remembrance of Hillel in Temple times — this is what Hillel did when the Temple existed: He enwrapped the Paschal lamb, the matzo and the bitter herbs to eat them as one, in fulfillment of the verse, "with matzot and maror (the bitter herb) they shall eat it."

So let’s talk about bread. Bread is widely accepted as the oldest man made food in existence. Evidence exists of grain being pounded into flour from 30,000 years ago. It’s so important to us that it has even permeated into our language.

The Latin for bread is “Panis”, when combined with “com” the Latin for “with“, we get words like companion and company.

Literally meaning “those I have bread with.“

In this case I used a nice farmhouse loaf. I got one of the other course delegates to come up and cut the bread into slices while I continued yabbering on.

Normal sliced white bread, while a staple part of our diet, isn’t that great. It’s full of additives which keep it fresher for longer and other nasty stuff that speeds up the leavening process so manufacturers can make it quicker.

Also everyone loves real freshly baked bread.

So next up is the butter.

First delegate sits down, next volunteer comes up and starts spreading on the butter.

Again butter has been around for thousands of years. Hindu texts tell the story of Krishna stealing butter as a child in around 1500 - 2000BC.

It was a way keeping milk from spoiling and up until fairly recently l, was globally thought of as a peasant food. The Romans had a low opinion of butter for example and generally did not consume it.

In the 16th century, the Catholic Church made it acceptable to eat butter during lent and it immediately became popular with everyone. In Western Europe it quickly became the cooking fat of choice and was popular sauce when melted.

Of course I’m using real butter here, because margarine is a disgrace, it’s French and even insects won’t eat it.

Volunteer number 2 sits down.

Volunteer number 3 starts assembling the sandwiches using precooked bacon. (The plan was to cook it on a camping hob but the Health & Safety hoops were too big to jump through.

So the main event bacon.

Curing and smoking meat has always been a way of making food last for longer. The origins of bacon in its own right are unknown, but smoking or curing goes back thousands of years.

Of course we have a variety of different kinds in this day and age; back, streaky, dry cured, smoked, unsmoked.

All have their place in the world but in this case I used good quality dry cured bacon. Cheap stuff is usually injected with smoke flavouring and water to bulk it out. When you cook bacon, if there is a ton of liquid or white film in the pan, it’s cheap stuff.

Buying it is false economy, most of it is water and it all shrinks when you cook it.

Buy the good stuff.

I also talked a bit about animal welfare and farming here.

Finally I dished out the sarnies and offered everyone a choice of ketchup or Brown sauce.

So where does ketchup come from?

The word ketchup has its origin in the Amoy (Chinese) word for fish sauce “koi chap”.

As the name suggest it was originally made from fish. The Royal Navy most likely brought the recipe back to Europe and on to the colonies in the 16th or 17th century. Over the years it evolved into a thick sauce primarily made from mushrooms.

In fact there is no mention of ketchup containing tomatoes until the early 19th century. These early recipes generally contain anchovies, belying their origin as a fish sauce.

In 1876 F&J Heinz released their version of ketchup in the states and added a shit ton of sugar as a preservative. And so the sweet ketchup we know today was born.

Meanwhile back in Blighty a grocer called Fred Garton was knocking up his own ketchup using molasses and vinegar. As a marketing stunt he would tell people it’s what they served in the Houses of Parliament. In 1899 “HP” (Houses of Parliament) sauce was launched.

The end.

If you ever have to do public speaking, make sure everyone’s mouths are full so they can’t ask any questions.
 

Oops

War Hero
You'll have access to a vac paccer?

As @Grouchy, but we nowadays vac it down, seems to percolate quicker without fridging and give it plenty of time to soak out, then hang for as long as we can manage to wait...
Grandfather would never 'fridge' it , but he dry cured in winter.... salted and turned in a galvanized tank that could hang bellies/ cheeks/ hams in. He was ultra concerned about the 'stickiness' of the fat cover.( Sorry if it doesn't make proper sense) but curing full bellies always seemed to make better bacon than off smaller lumps.
Eta.
Dr Google says the word is 'Pellicle', all I knew is we got b*llockings for even peeping under the lid and breathing on em..
Missus does half a dozen pigs at Christmas, makes her own sausage mix too (generational handed down recipe) it takes longer to make than the soddin pigs do to grow, but watching her link sausage, I knew she was a 'keeper'.
Screenshot_20200711-214440.png
 

Oops

War Hero
Some years back I was on a work course called “Presenting with confidence.”

It was basically DITs (defence instructional techniques) rebadged for civvies.

Anyway I fondly recalled that the best lecture / presentation I’d ever seen was at HMS Collingwood during my phase 2 training. This lad walked into the room, lobbed a brick through the window, which shattered into a thousand pieces, and then preceded to deliver a perfect lesson in how to glaze a window, demonstrating each step as he went along.

Not wishing to be outdone by some civvies, I decided my lecture on this course would be equally as good.

I decided to do it on Bacon Sandwiches.

I started the lecture by talking about sandwiches themselves and their history. We all know that the Earl of Sandwich coined the name. He was an excessive gambler who would spend days at the card table, getting up only to piss and shit. It’s well documented that he’d ask for “meat between two pieces of bread” so that his hands wouldn’t get greasy and get on the cards.

Others would then ask for their meat “like Sandwich had his” and the term stuck.

The origins actually go much further back. The first mention of putting something between two pieces of bread is in the first century BC when Hillel the Elder whacked his Passover lamb between two matzahs (unleavened bread) with some bitter herbs.

I’d argue that he actually invented the kebab, but the Jewish faith claims otherwise.

“This is a remembrance of Hillel in Temple times — this is what Hillel did when the Temple existed: He enwrapped the Paschal lamb, the matzo and the bitter herbs to eat them as one, in fulfillment of the verse, "with matzot and maror (the bitter herb) they shall eat it."

So let’s talk about bread. Bread is widely accepted as the oldest man made food in existence. Evidence exists of grain being pounded into flour from 30,000 years ago. It’s so important to us that it has even permeated into our language.

The Latin for bread is “Panis”, when combined with “com” the Latin for “with“, we get words like companion and company.

Literally meaning “those I have bread with.“

In this case I used a nice farmhouse loaf. I got one of the other course delegates to come up and cut the bread into slices while I continued yabbering on.

Normal sliced white bread, while a staple part of our diet, isn’t that great. It’s full of additives which keep it fresher for longer and other nasty stuff that speeds up the leavening process so manufacturers can make it quicker.

Also everyone loves real freshly baked bread.

So next up is the butter.

First delegate sits down, next volunteer comes up and starts spreading on the butter.

Again butter has been around for thousands of years. Hindu texts tell the story of Krishna stealing butter as a child in around 1500 - 2000BC.

It was a way keeping milk from spoiling and up until fairly recently l, was globally thought of as a peasant food. The Romans had a low opinion of butter for example and generally did not consume it.

In the 16th century, the Catholic Church made it acceptable to eat butter during lent and it immediately became popular with everyone. In Western Europe it quickly became the cooking fat of choice and was popular sauce when melted.

Of course I’m using real butter here, because margarine is a disgrace, it’s French and even insects won’t eat it.

Volunteer number 2 sits down.

Volunteer number 3 starts assembling the sandwiches using precooked bacon. (The plan was to cook it on a camping hob but the Health & Safety hoops were too big to jump through.

So the main event bacon.

Curing and smoking meat has always been a way of making food last for longer. The origins of bacon in its own right are unknown, but smoking or curing goes back thousands of years.

Of course we have a variety of different kinds in this day and age; back, streaky, dry cured, smoked, unsmoked.

All have their place in the world but in this case I used good quality dry cured bacon. Cheap stuff is usually injected with smoke flavouring and water to bulk it out. When you cook bacon, if there is a ton of liquid or white film in the pan, it’s cheap stuff.

Buying it is false economy, most of it is water and it all shrinks when you cook it.

Buy the good stuff.

I also talked a bit about animal welfare and farming here.

Finally I dished out the sarnies and offered everyone a choice of ketchup or Brown sauce.

So where does ketchup come from?

The word ketchup has its origin in the Amoy (Chinese) word for fish sauce “koi chap”.

As the name suggest it was originally made from fish. The Royal Navy most likely brought the recipe back to Europe and on to the colonies in the 16th or 17th century. Over the years it evolved into a thick sauce primarily made from mushrooms.

In fact there is no mention of ketchup containing tomatoes until the early 19th century. These early recipes generally contain anchovies, belying their origin as a fish sauce.

In 1876 F&J Heinz released their version of ketchup in the states and added a shit ton of sugar as a preservative. And so the sweet ketchup we know today was born.

Meanwhile back in Blighty a grocer called Fred Garton was knocking up his own ketchup using molasses and vinegar. As a marketing stunt he would tell people it’s what they served in the Houses of #,Parliament. In 1899 “HP” (Houses of Parliament) sauce was launched.

The end.

If you ever have to do public speaking, make sure everyone’s mouths are full so they can’t ask any questions.
Excellent.
You could also add that due to a barrel or two of anchovies getting missed/ forgotten about, the the liquor they finally reduced down to chemists Mr Lea and Mr Perrins spiced it up slightly and christened it after their home County.

Eta.
At what part of the proceedings do you hit em with the
'Pull up a bollard.....'. Reminisces
Or is that for a different audience/setting..
You'd have em choking on their barms!
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Square sausage is made in a loaf tin. No need for the skins and a special machine
 
Rusk.... i thought most sausages , i mean good sausages had it in as it absorbs the fat as it melts meaning the sausage stays juicy ?

Could have sworn its in most recipes ?

I think the misconception is that its used to bulk it out and save on meat . Maybe in your skanky catering jumbo sausage ....

Stand to be corrected anyway.
 
Jeebers, what I would give to have access to hotel fridges to raid
It's like working in a chocolate factory - abundance quickly becomes normal and unexciting. Variety and tasting is probably best bit, but one soon yearns for simple food like beans & toast
 
Rusk.... i thought most sausages , i mean good sausages had it in as it absorbs the fat as it melts meaning the sausage stays juicy ?

Could have sworn its in most recipes ?

I think the misconception is that its used to bulk it out and save on meat . Maybe in your skanky catering jumbo sausage ....

Stand to be corrected anyway.
Rusk in Sosigs

Rusk is used mainly when large amounts of sausages are being made. It is relatively cheap and tends to be sold in large quantities – catering for large batches of sausage making. It is a dried cereal ingredient and is made from wheat flour, salt and raising agent.​
Rusk comes in three types:- Pinhead, medium and coarse. Pinhead and medium tend to be used for making sausages and coarse is used for more rustic consistency like Haggis. The main difference being, apart from how finely it is ground, is the rate of absorption. The finer the ingredients, the quicker it absorbs liquid.​
The nutritional value is quite low and it has the capacity to absorb and swell 2 to 3 times it’s size with liquid and therefore used to “bulk” up the sausage mix. This is a great advantage when costing and calculating profit margins.
 
I've been making bacon and sausages for years (although bacon is a more recent thing).

It REALLY pays to do it properly, rather than out of a packet. Cures are always simple, especially dry cure. For those interested, the following site is excellent, with a really good cure calculator too.


I built a cold-smoker out of an old wine barrel. Took a while, but works realy well. I generally smoke over English oak, it's the traditional way.

I cure for a week or so, then wrap the fitch in muslin and air dry it in the cellar for a week or so (depending on the thickness of the belly), and smoke it for six or seven hours.



I use a vaccum machine to seal the cure bags. Once cured, washed and tried, then into muslin for the air drying.



Then smoking.



Then into vaccum bags again for a few days to allow the bacon to settle and the smoke to infuse more deeply.



Then sliced and vaccum bagged again.



Here with home made bread and home laid eggs.



On sausages, it's quite hard to find really good recipes. I like traditional English breakfast sausages, and it took a while to find a decent recipe. In the end, I used a receipe from "Floyd on Britain & Ireland" and changed things a little. It's a good recipe book for traditional English fare. Other than shoulder and speck, it has breadcrumbs, egg yolks, nutmeg, mace, ground cloves, salt, some sage and lots of thyme (you'll be surprised how much herbs it can take). I agree with the previous poster that natural skins is the only way to go.





 
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