Sauerkraut

#1
I was dragged down to Aldi today, by the misses, to get meat for my sarnies this week.
Whilst there I saw a jar of sauerkraut. Not had it for years, but I remember before I left Germany , if I went to a fast food place I would cover my food with it.
Anyhow I had it with my tea tonight, and it was gopping.
On reading the back of the jar it says
'Empty required amount into saucepan, add water,boil, simmer for ten to twenty minutes.
Sorry for all the waffle, but surely if I boil it, it would lose its flavor, I might as well be eating cabbage.
There is no brand name on the jar, just some nice looking girl with a couple of steins in front of her.
Does any one know a decent brand of sauerkraut, or do I actually have to boil my required of amount pickled cabbage
 
#2
I usually eat the Saukraut staight out of the Jar..... yeach it does taste a bit lip-puckering... but I gloop loads of tomato ketchup over it.... I never thought to heat it up. I hve tried microwaving it... but tates the same...

It is supposed to have health properties and be very good for you.... trouble is with me it usually brings on a awful urge to go to the WC... and plop a few skittery type pebble-dashing on the back of the pan... :lol:
 

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#3
Two brands you might want to watch for, since they produce marvellous Sauerkraut are "Havelland" and "Spreewald".

MsG
 
B

blindfire

Guest
#4
hairyarse2 said:
I was dragged down to Aldi today, by the misses, to get meat for my sarnies this week.
Whilst there I saw a jar of sauerkraut. Not had it for years, but I remember before I left Germany , if I went to a fast food place I would cover my food with it.
Anyhow I had it with my tea tonight, and it was gopping.
On reading the back of the jar it says
'Empty required amount into saucepan, add water,boil, simmer for ten to twenty minutes.
Sorry for all the waffle, but surely if I boil it, it would lose its flavor, I might as well be eating cabbage.
There is no brand name on the jar, just some nice looking girl with a couple of steins in front of her.
Does any one know a decent brand of sauerkraut, or do I actually have to boil my required of amount pickled cabbage
What you had in Germany was krautsalad - totally different to the minging sauerkraut that you bought :D
 
#5
Gundelsheim Sauerkraut. You place it in a shallow pan, add beer (8-12 oz)and caraway seeds (about 1 tablespoon). Cover with alu foil and poke a few holes in top. Cook on the grill over medum heat for approx 30 minutes.
 
#6
blindfire said:
hairyarse2 said:
I was dragged down to Aldi today, by the misses, to get meat for my sarnies this week.
Whilst there I saw a jar of sauerkraut. Not had it for years, but I remember before I left Germany , if I went to a fast food place I would cover my food with it.
Anyhow I had it with my tea tonight, and it was gopping.
On reading the back of the jar it says
'Empty required amount into saucepan, add water,boil, simmer for ten to twenty minutes.
Sorry for all the waffle, but surely if I boil it, it would lose its flavor, I might as well be eating cabbage.
There is no brand name on the jar, just some nice looking girl with a couple of steins in front of her.
Does any one know a decent brand of sauerkraut, or do I actually have to boil my required of amount pickled cabbage
What you had in Germany was krautsalad - totally different to the minging sauerkraut that you bought :D

Whoops, you might be right there. :oops:
 
#7
Fry up a chopped onion with some bacon and lob the jar of kraut into it once browned. Add leftover mash, butter, loads of salt and pepper and serve with pork bangers and onion gravy.
 
#8
Pickled fermented white cabbage out of a jar has already been cooked once and must be reheated before eating otherwise you are pretty likely to get some horrible boxhead disease (a craving to invade poland or something).

Raw sauerkraut ie not bottled or canned can be eaten as is and tastes pretty good.

Eisbein auf Sauerkraut - ummm all hungry now.
 
#9
Oh ye unkuuff persons,sauer kraut cooked with belly pork or smoked pork loin and mashed potato is an excellent meal ,cook up a couple of gallons
the flavour improves the older it gets,fried up with a few sliced spuds and chopped up smoked sausages such as chorizo it is the dogs whatsits of
a hangover cure, now that aldi has invaded Aus , can safely turn the family kraut pot into an umbrella stand
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#12
You bunch of peasants, you probably think it is German.
The best sauerkraut is the original Choucroute:

Choucroute garnie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sorry for the Wiki link....but it is in English.

"Although sauerkraut is a traditionally German and Eastern European dish, the French annexation of Alsace and Lorraine following the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 brought this dish to the attention of French chefs and it has since been widely adopted in France."

Might have ballsed up there, Alsacien, German first then nicked by the Chefs Grenouilles.
 

Nehustan

On ROPS
On ROPs
#13
...and my enormous ego thought this thread was about me...better to be sour than bitter...:excited:
 

Alsacien

LE
Moderator
#14
#16
This is how i like to eat it

Try draining off all the excess liquid, Rinse with water dry it off then lob it in a preheated frying pan with plenty of ghee. Add some salt and pepper and add loads off sugar to taste . Fry until it goes brownish. Best eaten with boiled potatoes and a strong sausage*Bratties* or kassler chop.

Lecker....
 
A

Aleegee1698

Guest
#18
I like making Krauts sauer, I say "Oi, you Boxheaded bastard, Achtung Spitfeuer", this makes them really sour.

Just saying like
 
#20
The Chines monks where there first by centuries.[/QUOTE ]Always thought cabbage was a north european thing. I`ve never heard of a "Cabbage Road" stretching to China.
[FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]The History of Sauerkraut[/FONT][/FONT]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Although sauerkraut - German for "sour cabbage" - is thought of as a German invention, Chinese laborers building the Great Wall of China over 2,000 years ago ate it as standard fare. Chinese sauerkraut, made from shredded cabbage fermented in RICE WINE,[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Most likely it was brought to Europe 1000 years later by Genghis Kahn after plundering China.
[/FONT]​
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Although in Germany instead of using the wine they dry cured it by sprinkling salt on the shredded cabbage. The water is then drawn out of the cabbage to make the juice that you see that accompanies the kraut. [/FONT]​
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The Dutch , who were great sea-fearing traders used sauerkraut on their ships as it did not need refrigeration and helped prevent scurvy. [/FONT]


 
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