Saudi - Palace Coup under way?

#21
This is also an interesting read about MBN:

The Prince of Counter Terrorism

In summary he plays well with our security folks but is still a hardcore Wahhabi.
There are many flavours of hardcore Wahhabism as I'm sure you know. My last trainee was a Muttawah but was what I now know is termed 'quiteist' and I had genuine respect for the guy.

Can't say about Nayef mind, anyone who has had someone with a bomb up their bottom explode next to him and got away with it must feel a bit more special than Mourinho.
 
#22
There only seems to be one place planning and stumping up for future seismic of any size at the minute, Abu Dhabi
That's what I hear too. Good job there is other stuff going on.
 
#24
And rightly so. Islam specifically allows the husband to have any woman 'that your right arm possesses'. Clearly she is a woman, inferior, and a slave. He can have her any time he wants. Further, the qur'an states his wife can never refuse him sex, so it is her fault. Of course she should go to jail.

Nothing wrong with the picture above, move along. Nothing to see here.

OT, Old King senile, Crown Prince takes the job, nothing changes. Thousands of family members to chose from for the successor. Non story.
Couldn't agree more - good to see a proper, autocratic theocracy in action when contrasted to that monogamous, secular barrel-bombing swine Assad; how dare anyone draw comparisons....
 
#25
On TDS Top royals in Saudi power struggle
...
At the centre are the two designated heirs to the 271-year-old House of Saud, which has ruled Saudi Arabia since its emergence as a modern state.

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, the king's 56-year-old nephew, is first in line to the throne but Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, believed to be about 30, is Salman's son and a rising power.

Mohammed bin Nayef is interior minister while Mohammed bin Salman runs the defence ministry, and their growing rivalry is making itself felt, experts say.

"It's resulting in some disturbing policies abroad and internally," says Frederic Wehrey of the Middle East Programme at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington.

He points to the "irresponsible" Saudi-led intervention in Yemen and says the key Western ally has taken a more "hardline tilt" away from reforms.

Tensions between the two princes emerged after the king's shock removal six months ago of Crown Prince Moqren, who had been appointed as the country's first deputy crown prince by Abdullah.

In the months since, the younger Mohammed bin Salman has moved to shore up his power, analysts say.

"A lot of people see this as a kind of a coup... that it's one faction taking power for itself," says Stephane Lacroix, a specialist in Saudi Arabia at Sciences Po university in Paris.

Moqren's case shows that "this position of deputy crown prince is a bit precarious," and helps explain why Mohammed bin Salman has been reinforcing his position, a Western diplomat says.

In addition to being defence minister, Mohammed bin Salman heads the kingdom's main economic coordinating council as well as a body overseeing Saudi Aramco, the state oil company in the world's biggest petroleum exporter.

"Mohammed bin Salman is clearly amassing extraordinary power and influence very quickly. This is bound to unsettle his rivals," Wehrey says.
...
It's like a Dynasty plot line.
 
#26
...
In an interview with Thomas Friedman of the New York Times last November, Prince Muhammad conceded that his proposed economic changes "could have political ramifications". In his more recent interview with the Economist, however, he dismissed the idea that they could require a remaking of the social contract between rulers and ruled:

Q: You believe you can have more taxation without more representation?

A: There are no taxes.
...
It's the way he tells them.
 
#32
Sorry, but the bit I've put in bold is incorrect. A normal drilling rig costs about 3 million USD. A fracking rig costs between 9 and 12 million USD. Where fracking is easier (and thus cheaper) than oil is when you compare onshore fracking with deep off-shore oil wells e.g. comparing fracking sites such as the Eagle Ford Shale in Texas with the deep-water rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. Apart from the cost of the rig, the cost of the infrastructure is identical: once out of the ground, oil is oil.

Typically oil costs 7 - 10 USD per bbl to extract and get to the point of loading in the US (at least, this is what it costs my clients). Fracking costs 11 - 17 USD per bbl (in Texas, where I have clients doing this). Saudi can get its oil out of the ground at 1.5 - 2 USD per bbl. North Sea oil, and the deeper Gulf of Mexico wells have a cost of approx 35 - 55 USD per bbl (which is why much of the North Sea and many Gulf wells are currently in hibernation).
US Shale ready Land Rig (1,500 HP) $20-25 million. A new light drilling or workover international land rig (say 1500 HP) would be in the region of $25-40 million to commission. . If you need additional torque for deeper, high temperature/pressure or directional drilling (2,000 to 3,000 HP) and you could double or triple the international land rig cost depending on power systems, mud systems and draw works capacity. Maintenance is also very expensive to maintain API certification.
 
#33
US Shale ready Land Rig (1,500 HP) $20-25 million. A new light drilling or workover international land rig (say 1500 HP) would be in the region of $25-40 million to commission. . If you need additional torque for deeper, high temperature/pressure or directional drilling (2,000 to 3,000 HP) and you could double or triple the international land rig cost depending on power systems, mud systems and draw works capacity. Maintenance is also very expensive to maintain API certification.
Well if you are going to buy nice shiny new units then yes, it will be expensive. If you're happy using old stock then it's cheaper, however I bow to your up-to-date pricing (my clients are too cheap to buy new)!
 
#34
MBS won the fight to be Crown Prince, MBN is out.
No shock there, this was done and dusted ages barring the public announcement. Nothing is ever certain in the Magic Kingdom though.
 
#36
Addiction and intrigue: Inside the Saudi palace coup

Mohamed Bin Salman is a very dangerous muppet who will take his country over a cliff unless he's neutered before his father feels the urge to retire.

Leaving half the world's oil reserves to Kim Jong-un in a dishdasha can't be high on anyone's list of priorities.
He will still buy our arms won't he, I would hate the robbing so and sos BAE to go under
 
#37
The Saudi hierarchs can invent another war that could rope in duplicitous foreign ministers, and let their peasants hate the infidels for a bit longer!
 
#38
Kerist, is the coup still ongoing?
 
#39

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