Saudi Journalist Disappears in Saudi Consulate in Turkey

royal court advisformer
I misread that as "astronomer" for a moment and thought it was actually kind of cool that the royal star-gazer was mixed up in a scheme to eliminate an enemy of the throne. Like a modern John Dee. And then I remembered that time the *actual* Saudi court official whose job it is to observe the moon and announce the exact beginning of Ramadan fucked it up, was put right by a real astronomer, they tried to hush it up:

Did Muslims miscall end of Ramadan fast?
 
The following was posted in more detail on the Yemen thread, but here I am focusing on Khashoggi related aspects.

The US senate has voted to end military support for the Saudi coalition in Yemen and intend to push for sanctions against Saudi Arabia next year.
Breaking with Trump, Republican-led Senate pushes to end U.S. support for Saudi war in Yemen | CBC News
In a rare break with U.S. President Donald Trump, the Senate voted on Wednesday to move ahead with a resolution to end U.S. military support for the Saudi Arabian-led coalition in the war in Yemen and lawmakers vowed to push for sanctions against the kingdom in the new year.
The reasons for this include both the humanitarian disaster in the Yemen war and, significantly for this thread, displeasure over the Saudi murder of Khashoggi.
But backers of the resolution said it sent an important message that lawmakers are unhappy with the humanitarian disaster in Yemen, and angry about the lack of a strong U.S. response to the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi at a Saudi consulate in Turkey.
Republican and Democratic lawmakers also vowed to keep pushing after the new Congress take office in January for further tough action against Saudi Arabia, including legislation to impose human rights sanctions and opposition to weapons sales.
Well known and important senator Lindsey Graham said that bin Salman is so odious that he cannot see doing business with Saudi Arabia "unless there's a change there". It would appear that he is calling for bin Salman to be removed from power.
"If you want to buy our weapons, there are certain things you have to accept. How you use them matters," Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham told a news conference.
"The individual, the crown prince, is so toxic, so tainted, so flawed, that I can't ever see myself doing business with Saudi Arabia unless there's a change there," said Graham, generally a close Trump ally in the Senate.
 
Saudi Arabia has rejected a US Senate resolution criticizing Saudi Arabia for the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. Saudi Arabia called the criticism interference in Saudi Arabia's internal affairs and said it was based on "unsubstantiated claims and allegations".
Saudi Arabia rejects U.S. Senate's 'interference' in kingdom | CBC News
In a lengthy statement early Monday, Saudi Arabia said the Senate's resolution "contained blatant interferences" in the kingdom's internal affairs and undermines its regional and international role. The resolution was based on "unsubstantiated claims and allegations," the statement also said.

"The kingdom categorically rejects any interference in its internal affairs, any and all accusations, in any manner, that disrespect its leadership ... and any attempts to undermine its sovereignty or diminish its stature," it said.
 
Back to business as usual.

'Saudi Arabia’s King Salman issued a wide-ranging overhaul of top government posts on Thursday, including naming a new foreign minister, following international fallout from the killing of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi nearly three months ago. He also ordered a shakeup of the kingdom’s two supreme councils that oversee matters related to the economy and security, respectively. Both councils are headed by the king’s son, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, whose powers, including roles as deputy prime minister and defense minister, were untouched in the overhaul.'

After Khashoggi killing, Saudi king overhauls cabinet, names new FM
 
Back to business as usual.

'Saudi Arabia’s King Salman issued a wide-ranging overhaul of top government posts on Thursday, including naming a new foreign minister, following international fallout from the killing of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi nearly three months ago. He also ordered a shakeup of the kingdom’s two supreme councils that oversee matters related to the economy and security, respectively. Both councils are headed by the king’s son, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, whose powers, including roles as deputy prime minister and defense minister, were untouched in the overhaul.'

After Khashoggi killing, Saudi king overhauls cabinet, names new FM

Do the retiring ministers leave with a lump sum and a good pension.... ?






Or a whistling scimitar ?
 
And the fall-out continues. Netflix is being criticized for censoring their content for customers in Saudi Arabia to remove a show where an American comedian criticized Saudi Arabia and bin Salman over the murder of Khashoggi and the Saudi involvement in Yemen.
Netflix criticized for pulling Patriot Act episode in Saudi Arabia over Khashoggi killing, Yemen | CBC News
Minhaj used his second episode, released on Oct. 28, to lambaste Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman over the killing of Washington Post writer Jamal Khashoggi and the Saudi-led coalition at war in Yemen.
Minhaj said the crown prince was being hailed as the reformer the Arab world needed until Khashoggi's killing.

"The revelations about Khashoggi's killing have shattered that image and it blows my mind that it took the killing of a Washington Post journalist for everyone to go: 'Oh, I guess he's not really a reformer,"' he added.

In the roughly 18-minute monologue, Minhaj also mentions the ruling Al Saud family and its vast wealth, saying: "Saudi Arabia is crazy. One giant family controls everything."
Netflix removed the episode when they received a demand from the Saudis.
Netflix, in a statement Wednesday, said the episode was removed from the kingdom as a result of a legal request from authorities and not due to its content.
While political censorship is of course extensive in Saudi Arabia, this incident shows that the Khashoggi incident continues to have consequences both inside and outside Saudi Arabia.
 
Saudi prosecutors say they will seek the death penalty for 5 of 11 suspects in the Khashoggi murder. Saudi prosecutors seeking death penalty for 5 suspects in Khashoggi killing | CBC News
Saudi Arabia announced on Thursday it will seek the death penalty against five suspects in the slaying of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, a killing that has seen members of crown prince Mohammed bin Salman's entourage implicated in the writer's assassination.
There was no explanation as to why 7 of the original 18 arrested are not facing charges at this time, nor did they name those who were in court.
Prosecutors announced that 11 suspects in the slaying attended their first court hearing with lawyers, but the statement did not name those in court. It also did not explain why seven other suspects arrested over the Oct. 2 killing at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul did not immediately face formal charges. The kingdom previously announced 18 people had been arrested.
The news story has a brief but good summary of events up to this point and is worth reading by those looking for a refresher.
 
US foreign minister Pompeo met with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman today. Pompeo said that he brought up the issue of Khashoggi's murder. Bin Salman assured him that everyone responsible will be held accountable.
Pompeo says he raised Khashoggi killing, fate of women activists with Saudi prince | CBC News
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Monday that Saudi leaders assured him everyone responsible for the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi would be held accountable, as Riyadh tries to resolve its biggest political crisis in a generation.
However, a US CIA assessment said that bin Salman himself ordered the murder, so those assurances sound a bit hollow in my opinion.
A CIA assessment has blamed the crown prince for ordering the killing, which Saudi officials deny. At least 21 Saudis are under investigation in the case, with five facing the death penalty. Five officials were also fired, including a senior royal adviser.
"They both acknowledged that accountability needed to take place. They talked about the process that is occurring inside their country, both the investigative process and the judicial process that is taking place," Pompeo said.
Pompeo is primarily in the region to try to shore up an anti-Iran coalition, in which Saudi Arabia would play a major role.
Pompeo urges Gulf states to heal rift over Qatar | CBC News
 

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