Saudi Arabia announces 34-country Islamic coalition to fight terrorism

#1
Will this turn out to be a talking shop or will there be boots on the ground in the near future? If they are taking the fight to Daesh why now?

The announcement cited "a duty to protect the Islamic nation from the evils of all terrorist groups and organizations whatever their sect and name which wreak death and corruption on earth and aim to terrorize the innocent."
Saudi Arabia announces 34-country Islamic coalition to fight terrorism
 
#2
Being a cynic, I'd call it a PR exercise. The Saudis organising against terrorism is like arsenic organising against poor health. I'm more interested in what's provoked it - a continuing desire to present itself as the leader of the Islamic world? A growing worry that it isn't Washington's best friend any more? A need to create allies to support it when IS or a form of it inevitably tries to destabilise SA itself? I'm sure more informed members here will have a better analysis.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
Perhaps this coalition can forge its cohesion and score an early win against extremism by withdrawing funding for the export of Wahhabist preachers.
 
#4
Its like the SS Announcing they are creating a Jewish Retirement Home organisation or King Herod moving into the Childcare business.


The Sauds are the biggest funders of Islamic terrorism on the planet. All roads lead back to Riyadd.
 
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#5
I wonder if the oil price drop has had any influence in this decision - if SA can take on ISIS and limit the flow of oil via Syria/Iraq then they might be able to cause a rise in global oil price, which they desperately need.

In addition they will potentially be able to get rid of some of the 'spare' population who are doing very little and save some of the limited income they are currently spending on upkeep of those who do very little.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
Being a cynic, I'd call it a PR exercise. The Saudis organising against terrorism is like arsenic organising against poor health. I'm more interested in what's provoked it - a continuing desire to present itself as the leader of the Islamic world? A growing worry that it isn't Washington's best friend any more? A need to create allies to support it when IS or a form of it inevitably tries to destabilise SA itself? I'm sure more informed members here will have a better analysis.
A combination of three things spring to mind:

1. They are facing a real threat and they need to do something.
2. They've probably come to the view that even the West won't sit still forever if the sort of thing we saw in Paris continues - their interests will be hit by association.
3. From what I can glean from the article about the membership, by coincidence, it does box Iran in rather nicely.
 
#8
A combination of three things spring to mind:

1. They are facing a real threat and they need to do something.
2. They've probably come to the view that even the West won't sit still forever if the sort of thing we saw in Paris continues - their interests will be hit by association.
3. From what I can glean from the article about the membership, by coincidence, it does box Iran in rather nicely.
Point 1. They are facing a threat and much of it is of their own making.
On point 2. I have been thinking for some time now that attitudes are changing slowly as regards extremists. The apologists are getting fewer and the silent majority are getting louder.
It has been said many times that the only way to defeat Islam extremist is to use Islam moderates. It's about time the Arab world started helping itself.
Having said that, I agree with point 3. The Saudi's wont take a dump unless it is in their interest to do so.
 
#10
A combination of three things spring to mind:

1. They are facing a real threat and they need to do something.
2. They've probably come to the view that even the West won't sit still forever if the sort of thing we saw in Paris continues - their interests will be hit by association.
3. From what I can glean from the article about the membership, by coincidence, it does box Iran in rather nicely.
and

4. It gives them an excuse to wipe out as many Shia as they can in the name of 'fighting terrorism'.
 
#12
Interesting article on perceived Saudi funding of IS.

Theory That Saudi Arabia Funds ISIS - Business Insider

Riyadh's concern about blowback -- namely, the belief that allowing citizens to support terrorist groups hostile to the al-Saud monarchy will eventually spawn attacks on Saudi soil -- helps drive the kingdom's counterterrorism approach.

It appears that IS are now generating more money through "activities such as smuggling (of oil, weapons, antiquities), extortion (e.g., the group levies around $8 million per month in "taxes" on local businesses), and other crimes (e.g., robberies, counterfeiting)." than by private donations.
Although Saudis have undoubtedly contributed greatly to the cause in the past, it would seem that IS have become too powerful and SA has decided it's time to clip a few wings in the region.
 
#14
...more seriously, between this and the debacle over oil prices, which is backfiring on them, are we seeing an endgame for the House of Saud?

The more forward looking beards in Riyadh will already be looking to a post ME retirement if they want to die peacefully in their beds.

Salman the Idiot unleashed the Islamist genie on his own doorstep and its coming to get him.
 
#15
I wonder if the oil price drop has had any influence in this decision - if SA can take on ISIS and limit the flow of oil via Syria/Iraq then they might be able to cause a rise in global oil price, which they desperately need.

In addition they will potentially be able to get rid of some of the 'spare' population who are doing very little and save some of the limited income they are currently spending on upkeep of those who do very little.
Russia are saying they will be producing $40 per barrel for several years to come,This morning they are saying $30 per barrel.
 
#16
One of the key reasons behind the low price of oil atm is due to OPEC nations getting the per barrel price to make the US's shale industry look expensive. According to R4 & the FT last week anyway.
 
#17
One of the key reasons behind the low price of oil atm is due to OPEC nations getting the per barrel price to make the US's shale industry look expensive. According to R4 & the FT last week anyway.
Yep, but the cost of shale is also falling. They've wrong-footed themselves.

I can't help thinking that there's an unspoken policy of breaking the ME's energy stranglehold - it'd never be said out loud, of course, but the Arabs have been given wealth and either behave like the worst of lotto winners or export terrorism. That had to come back to bite them one day...
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#18
One of the key reasons behind the low price of oil atm is due to OPEC nations getting the per barrel price to make the US's shale industry look expensive. According to R4 & the FT last week anyway.
The US is the new 'swing' province for global oil production. Whatever the immediate effect on the US Onshore of the current period of low oil price, the industry will regenerate itself very quickly when the oil price goes up. Essentially all Saudi is doing is subsidising the global economy via the provision of cheap energy. The petro-economies will be hurt (and perhaps the Scots will realise what dangerous rubbish Salmond was spouting) but it's good news for everyone else. That's partially why, in economic terms, the oil and gas industry's performance has generally been counter-cyclical to the rest of the economy.
 
#19
I wonder if the oil price drop has had any influence in this decision - if SA can take on ISIS and limit the flow of oil via Syria/Iraq then they might be able to cause a rise in global oil price, which they desperately need.

In addition they will potentially be able to get rid of some of the 'spare' population who are doing very little and save some of the limited income they are currently spending on upkeep of those who do very little.
I thought Saudi crashed the oil price by opening their taps to try and bankrupt the US frackers and make the US reliant on Saudi imports again. Instead they seem to have bankrupted themselves (and ballsed my employment prospects in the process, the pigs!). Presumably all they need to do is cut production and, once the glut is used up, up will go the price again...?
 
#20
I thought Saudi crashed the oil price by opening their taps to try and bankrupt the US frackers and make the US reliant on Saudi imports again. Instead they seem to have bankrupted themselves (and ballsed my employment prospects in the process, the pigs!). Presumably all they need to do is cut production and, once the glut is used up, up will go the price again...?

Alas, the sanctions on Iran are lifting next year. Look north young man.
 

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