SASR "Execute" unarmed Afghan

they're not dragging ira scum in for questioning. /QUOTE]

They are. You are really not paying attention. Try one of the bigger fish, John Downey, the former OC of PIRA's England Wing, he who waved a 'comfort letter' at the Old Bailey and walked. He's far from at ease on the streets of old Mother Ireland, as are others of his ilk as the Southern Irish government close in on his former activities.
 
They are. You are really not paying attention. Try one of the bigger fish, John Downey, the former OC of PIRA's England Wing, he who waved a 'comfort letter' at the Old Bailey and walked. He's far from at ease on the streets of old Mother Ireland, as are others of his ilk as the Southern Irish government close in on his former activities.
He'll never see the inside of court.

And on the outside chance he does, he's 68 now and has 'health problems'. So he'll not see jail.
 
And in which modern Army and Marine Corps in a large western nation introduced the quant practice in a SEA nation in a late 20th century war. Those necklace's sure did look nice.
In the book A Rumour of War by Philip Caputo, documenting his time as a USMC Lt in Vietnam, he describes coming across an Australian soldier who reaches into his kit and produces some ears. It was the first time he’d seen such a thing.
 

Nato123

On ROPS
On ROPs
In the book A Rumour of War by Philip Caputo, documenting his time as a USMC Lt in Vietnam, he describes coming across an Australian soldier who reaches into his kit and produces some ears. It was the first time he’d seen such a thing.

TBH, the USMC were pretty famous for collecting 'trophies' including sending jap skull home to their girlfriends, so he must have heard of the stories?
 
He'll never see the inside of court.

And on the outside chance he does, he's 68 now and has 'health problems'. So he'll not see jail.
You appear to be very cognisant of the laws of the Irish Republic. Keep in mind they were also jailing PIRA / INLA while sequestering their funds gained from criminal actions, the late Macker being a principal example and one we never managed to do.

This gent, during his OTR years in Holland, introduced PIRA to the financial benefits of moving drugs to Ireland, a matter that has not been forgotten by the Gardai specialist units.

I acknowledge,he may not face jail, but it's a big 'not' . He will however see his finances being seriously diminished, a matter he is furiously addressing.

Apologies to readers, for thread drift.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
In the book A Rumour of War by Philip Caputo, documenting his time as a USMC Lt in Vietnam, he describes coming across an Australian soldier who reaches into his kit and produces some ears. It was the first time he’d seen such a thing.
I thought he was wearing them as a necklace. US SF used to do the same, apparently.
 
In the book A Rumour of War by Philip Caputo, documenting his time as a USMC Lt in Vietnam, he describes coming across an Australian soldier who reaches into his kit and produces some ears. It was the first time he’d seen such a thing.
He was in the first ground force contingent of US Forces to be committed to Vietnam in 1965. A Brigade from the USMC whose job was to defend Danang Air Base and its approach's. He served in 1 Corps from 1965 to 1965.

The only Australians in that area were members of the Australian Army Training Team Vietnam (AATTV) who were highly experienced professional officers and SNCO's some who had served in WW2 and korea (including some poms who had joined the Australian Army)

I seriously doubt that any of them would have indulged in such behaviour. They were drawn from all parts of the Australian Army though mostly Infantry. I am certain that if any one of them had mutilated an enemy soldier and kept body parts, he would have been dealt with.
 

QRK2

LE
He was in the first ground force contingent of US Forces to be committed to Vietnam in 1965. A Brigade from the USMC whose job was to defend Danang Air Base and its approach's. He served in 1 Corps from 1965 to 1965.

The only Australians in that area were members of the Australian Army Training Team Vietnam (AATTV) who were highly experienced professional officers and SNCO's some who had served in WW2 and korea (including some poms who had joined the Australian Army)

I seriously doubt that any of them would have indulged in such behaviour. They were drawn from all parts of the Australian Army though mostly Infantry. I am certain that if any one of them had mutilated an enemy soldier and kept body parts, he would have been dealt with.
I have Caputo's book in front of me and whilst I don't have the time to read through to find the passage it is referenced here: Lethality in Combat

ETA found the quote:

. . . pulled something from his pocket and, grinning, held it up the way a fisherman posing for a photograph holds up a prize trout. It was an educational, if not an edifying, sight. Nothing could hare been better calculated to give an idea of the kind of war Vietnam was and the kind of things men are capable of in war if they stay in it Iong enough. I will not disguise my emotions. I was shocked by what I saw, partly because I had not expected to see such a thing and partly because the man hoIding it was a mirror image of myself-a member of the English-speaking world. Actually, I should refer to "it" in the plural, because there were two of them, strung on a wire: two brown and bloodstained human ears
 
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Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I have Caputo's book in front of me and whilst I don't have the time to read through to find the passage it is referenced here: Lethality in Combat

ETA found the quote:

. . . pulled something from his pocket and, grinning, held it up the way a fisherman posing for a photograph holds up a prize trout. It was an educational, if not an edifying, sight. Nothing could hare been better calculated to give an idea of the kind of war Vietnam was and the kind of things men are capable of in war if they stay in it Iong enough. I will not disguise my emotions. I was shocked by what I saw, partly because I had not expected to see such a thing and partly because the man hoIding it was a mirror image of myself-a member of the English-speaking world. Actually, I should refer to "it" in the plural, because there were two of them, strung on a wire: two brown and bloodstained human ears
That's where I got necklace from.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Poor Leadership

This is a better link from the Sydney Morning Herald from two days ago. Nick McKenzie from the SMH has been pushing this with Chris Masters for a couple of years now, and is being sued for defamation by Ben Robert-Smith VC and so has a vested interest in the story.

There is also a link to Dusty Miller RAAMC a POM medic attached to SASR at the time. I have cut and pasted relevant paragraphs from Finlays speech which would appear to comprimise any future criminal court cases with his prejudicial remarks, especially as his comments have been leaked to the press worldwide.

Multiple sources with knowledge of the meeting revealed General Findlay, the Australian Special Operations Commander, briefed dozens of Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) soldiers at Perth’s Campbell Barracks, telling them, “Brereton knows more about this command than anybody.” General Findlay said Justice Brereton had interviewed hundreds of SAS personnel under oath and he had a “very strong evidential basis of what is fact”.

“There are guys who criminally did something. But can you tell me, why was that?” General Findlay asked the soldiers present at the briefing. He then said Justice Brereton had identified “trigger pullers” and “names that come up beyond the trigger pullers” who enabled war crimes. General Findlay went on to blame the war crimes on what he described as “one common cause”.

“It is poor leadership,” he said. “In fact, it is poor moral leadership.”


General Findlay said in his March briefing that a small number of commissioned officers had allowed a culture where abhorrent conduct was permitted. He said a handful of experienced soldiers including patrol commanders and deputy patrol commanders, who typically led five-man SAS teams on missions, had also enabled this culture to exist.

"If you have led a command climate that has permitted people to think [it was OK to do] egregiously wrong acts, you need to be rooted out. One, as an individual and, two, as a group," he said. “You’ll have to sleep once you leave the services. If your honour has been compromised, it will affect you for the rest of your life.”


General Findlay said in his briefing it was unfair that the misconduct of a few soldiers who served in Afghanistan had damaged the reputation of the majority of the SAS who had done nothing wrong. "I imagine this is tainting the regiment you love," he said.
He explained the genesis of the inquiry had been SAS soldiers writing letters to the top brass about misconduct, forcing General Campbell to call for inquiries to "examine our soul because it wasn’t right".
General Findlay said Justice Brereton was compiling "a raft of findings" and the reason his inquiry had taken four years was because "a number" of new whistleblowers had recently emerged to speak up. But General Findlay warned those still covering up war crimes were in the "red zone" and once the Brereton report was completed, he added, there would be "no retracting”.

"[Justice Brereton] is going to list those people, because if you have lied under oath and there is evidence to prove it, which he’s got, you are a perjurer."


The special forces commander also called out a very small number of those who had served in the elite SAS who acted as "self righteous entitled prick" who believed the rules of the regular army didn't apply to them. He said arrogance in this small group had fuelled a poor internal culture and "caused all the problems" now facing the SAS.
General Findlay said the "brutal truth" was that the war crimes scandal had caused "an issue of trust" between special forces, which comprise the SAS and the Commandos, and with the Australian people and the wider military. He said people within the SAS who "had nothing to do with this" now had to "serve to make this place better and pay for the sins" of others.
“We have to continue the cultural and governance change. For a lot of reasons but because it is right
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Surely it is time to ban all personal webcams , phones etc on ops
Why?

There needs to be an acceptance of what is socially and militarily acceptable. Sometimes, the two aren't the same.

I don't agree that it's right/fair to judge from the safety and comfort of an armchair and I'm strongly suspicious of a situation where everyone is running around with a camera on them all the time, even in this post-Shiner era.

However, there's also the question of military discipline. It seems that the SASR has had similar issues to some SEAL units, with a few rather dangerous (in all senses of the word) even threatening other members of their units to stay silent.
 

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