Sas soldier falls through roof on para training op

HAHO, open at altitude, fly for 20 miles, land quietly, much more discrete.

Or the night jump reality - Exit in single-stream, locate the T/L who should be in the middle of the stick, orient to him, check compass bearing, fcuk around with your seat straps to get more comfortable, disengage steering toggles from the velcro keepers, undertake a couple of left/right turns to check canopy response maybe pull on front risers to close up grouping.

Let's hope Intel were correct and there's no 'sophisticated' radar looking for us.

#- a parachutist under a canopy has the radar 'footprint' of a Cessna- 182. Both London & Larkhill radar could accurately follow a 16 person group from exit to landing onto Salisbury Plain DZ's in 1970.
 
Anyone who has spent time here knows that americans are shite at placing any english accent. I invariably always get, “ah, you’re Australian”.
When embedded with the Cousins I was accused by another resident Brit that I sounded like David Niven. Only more posh. Hey, you use what you’ve got.......
 
My comment was based on the fact that just about every ‘conventional’ supply drop into water in 82 was waterproof 1 Ton containers off the ramp.

Hence me thinking that CO 2 PARA would not be joining in with the RCT lads to push that out.

But door bundles a possibility.

What sort of things did they drop in for the task group?
 
When embedded with the Cousins I was accused by another resident Brit that I sounded like David Niven. Only more posh. Hey, you use what you’ve got.......
I used my best David Niven accent to get 'bedded' with as many female Yankee Doodles as I possibly could.
 
What sort of things did they drop in for the task group?
Very quick answer (I joined up in 83 so wasn't there) is a myriad of Combat Supplies such as mail, spares for ships, medical stuff (list goes on).

The containers weighed circa 1 ton each and (in theory) could remain afloat for up to 24 hours.

ETA -From Wikipedia and apologies for thread drift.

Part of 47 Air Despatch Squadron, Royal Corps of Transport, went to Ascension on Fearless. They prepared their first packages for airdropping on 19 April, of high priority supplies for HMS Alacrity and Invincible. The first LR2 Hercules arrived at Wideawake Airfield on 12 May, and four days later a 24-hour, 6,300-nautical-mile (11,700 km) flight delivered 1,000 pounds (450 kg) of supplies to Antelope. A flight to the Falkland Islands would take 28 hours, so two crews were needed, and required five Victor tankers for aerial refuelling. McQueen tried to enforce a policy that airdrop loads be rigged in the UK to save space at Ascension, but was overruled by Fieldhouse. By 1 June, 47 Air Despatch Squadron had prepared 47 loads totalling 163 long tons (166 t), with high priority items delivered within 40 hours of the initial request.[90] Airdrop missions mounted from Ascension were given girls' names, in ascending alphabetical order. After "Zara" was flown on 9 June, the sequence started again with "Alison" the following day. While most airdrops were at sea, some were made to units in the Falkland Islands.[92] Those at sea were made with the stores in waterproof containers which were retrieved by the ships' boats.[93] Occasionally personnel were also dropped. In the "Ursula" mission on 1 June, Lieutenant Colonel David Chaundler, a replacement commander for 2 Para, parachuted into the sea and was plucked from the water by a boat from the frigate HMS Penelope.[94][95]
 
Or the night jump reality - Exit in single-stream, locate the T/L who should be in the middle of the stick, orient to him, check compass bearing, fcuk around with your seat straps to get more comfortable, disengage steering toggles from the velcro keepers, undertake a couple of left/right turns to check canopy response maybe pull on front risers to close up grouping.

Let's hope Intel were correct and there's no 'sophisticated' radar looking for us.

#- a parachutist under a canopy has the radar 'footprint' of a Cessna- 182. Both London & Larkhill radar could accurately follow a 16 person group from exit to landing onto Salisbury Plain DZ's in 1970.

As several narco-sponsored bundle jumpers found out in the USA. Was the time cartels were hanging around civvy DZ's trying to recruit serving and former military to jump with a bundle full of coke.

Its all well practiced with the things you developed, but there is still plenty of scope for the Emperor to join the load and waft his purple smoke around. Especially when you are strapped to big bergans and weapons, and from the couple of pics I saw the unfortunate had a large rucksack laying next to him on the kitchen floor.
 
When embedded with the Cousins I was accused by another resident Brit that I sounded like David Niven. Only more posh. Hey, you use what you’ve got.......

Off topic alert:

I'm over 60 now, keep myself fit, last week in the supermarket car park wandering back to the car twaddling with the daughter I notice a tasty looking black lady, late 30's, early 40's, paying attention to us. She was parked one space over from us, nothing in between, stood outside her car messing around with paperwork. She wandered over to me, big smile, and said, "I do like your accent, where are you from". <I nearly had a moment>

Sadly with daughter in tow a quick, polite, chat was it.
 
As several narco-sponsored bundle jumpers found out in the USA. Was the time cartels were hanging around civvy DZ's trying to recruit serving and former military to jump with a bundle full of coke.

Its all well practiced with the things you developed, but there is still plenty of scope for the Emperor to join the load and waft his purple smoke around. Especially when you are strapped to big bergans and weapons, and from the couple of pics I saw the unfortunate had a large rucksack laying next to him on the kitchen floor.
Off Topic alert (2) but hey, this is the NAAFI.

Your post reminded me of an incident where, as best I can remember, 2 RAF PJI's working out of sunny El Centro got involved in some contraband 'redistribution' from USA to UK.

Not by parachute but on the C130 going back to Blighty. I think they got collared but someone here should know the gen.
 
Well I suppose there are Americans in England who think the English are shite at placing any American accent. Which most Canadians will attest to.

When I say cannot place an English accent I mean that they could not tell you if someone is from the UK, Australia, NZ, or Saffer Land.
 

Awol

LE
Very quick answer (I joined up in 83 so wasn't there) is a myriad of Combat Supplies such as mail, spares for ships, medical stuff (list goes on).

The containers weighed circa 1 ton each and (in theory) could remain afloat for up to 24 hours.

ETA -From Wikipedia and apologies for thread drift.

Part of 47 Air Despatch Squadron, Royal Corps of Transport, went to Ascension on Fearless. They prepared their first packages for airdropping on 19 April, of high priority supplies for HMS Alacrity and Invincible. The first LR2 Hercules arrived at Wideawake Airfield on 12 May, and four days later a 24-hour, 6,300-nautical-mile (11,700 km) flight delivered 1,000 pounds (450 kg) of supplies to Antelope. A flight to the Falkland Islands would take 28 hours, so two crews were needed, and required five Victor tankers for aerial refuelling. McQueen tried to enforce a policy that airdrop loads be rigged in the UK to save space at Ascension, but was overruled by Fieldhouse. By 1 June, 47 Air Despatch Squadron had prepared 47 loads totalling 163 long tons (166 t), with high priority items delivered within 40 hours of the initial request.[90] Airdrop missions mounted from Ascension were given girls' names, in ascending alphabetical order. After "Zara" was flown on 9 June, the sequence started again with "Alison" the following day. While most airdrops were at sea, some were made to units in the Falkland Islands.[92] Those at sea were made with the stores in waterproof containers which were retrieved by the ships' boats.[93] Occasionally personnel were also dropped. In the "Ursula" mission on 1 June, Lieutenant Colonel David Chaundler, a replacement commander for 2 Para, parachuted into the sea and was plucked from the water by a boat from the frigate HMS Penelope.[94][95]
Did Lt Col Chaundler die shortly afterwards?

I only ask because I’ve just listened to the audiobook of Mark ‘Splash’ Aston’s “SAS - Sea King Down” about his pretty well miraculous escape from the chopper that went down in the Falklands whilst crossdecking*.

In the book he mentioned someone jumping into the oggin and getting picked up in sharpish order, but I’m sure he said that they died fairly soon afterwards, after the war. Being an audiobook it’s very difficult to flick back through the pages to doublecheck a detail.



*The book is recommended, but as is often the case, the publishers pick a young narrator off the shelf, normally with a London/McNab accent, but with bugger all knowledge of the Army with the result that glaring things are mis-pronounced. That big belt fed machinegun for instance went from Jimpy to Gimpy.

Still, quite forgivable and obviously not the fault of the author. What is the fault of the author though is getting the year of Prince’s Gate completely wrong, especially considering the Regiment he was a part of.

Incidentally, Aston’s nickname had nothing to do with swimming out of a submerged Sea King in 1982, but had everything to do with him arriving for Recruits Training and the Sergeant at the guardhouse as he reported for duty saying “What’s your name son?”

“Aston Sergeant”.

“Fück me, that’ll never do, everyone here has a nickname..... let me think..... yes, I’ve got it...... Splash, yep, Splash. That’s you now..... better get used to it”.

And so he did.
 

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