SAS heros battle for survivor of Rorkes Drift

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by fairycakes, Apr 24, 2010.

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  1. Edited and copied from the Mirror newspaper.

    Kneeling beside a gravestone in a village churchyard, one old soldier pays his ­respects to another.

    As a veteran of the SAS, Pete ­Winner put his life on the line in the Middle East and the Falklands as well as helped to end the 1980 Iranian embassy siege.

    But even he is left speechless in ­admiration for the man he has to come to honour... Private Robert Jones, one of just 140 ­British soldiers who fought off 4,000 Zulus at Rorke’s Drift in South Africa in 1879 – the battle was famously immortalised in the 1964 film Zulu, starring Michael Caine and Stanley Baker.

    Yet this final resting place in ­Herefordshire of Private Jones, VC, also serves as a ­continuing slight to the memory of one of Britain’s ­greatest heroes.

    All the other gravestones in St Peter’s graveyard face towards the church, but his, humiliatingly, faces the other way because he committed suicide.

    Driven to despair by his memories of Rorke’s Drift, Private Jones took a shotgun into the woods not far from St Peter’s on a summer’s day 19 years after the battle – and shot himself.
    Full story
    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2010/04/25/sas-hero-s-battle-for-survivor-of-rorke-s-drift-115875-22209452/
     
  2. A classic case of PTSD ....... It is always extremely sad for any brave soldier to end his\her days like this.
    Today thank god, we have a number of professional stations who can help overcome these problems, however there is one last act of bravery the veteran first has to do ..... That is taking that first step for help.
    Private Jones never had that luxury in them days ......... Fortunately we do!!
     
  3. Bizarre - facing the other way usually means the occupant of the grave is a priest, still facing his flock.

    Murderers (which used to include suicides) would be excluded from the graveyard if the intent was to stigmatise. Or at least that's what happened round here.
     
  4. Longlenny

    Longlenny War Hero Book Reviewer

    I wish him luck in his efforts.
     
  5. Sorry, my cynicalometer is in active mode. After all these years, Snapper finds this cause celebre? Nothing to do with his 'new' book coming out then?
     
  6. Soldier "I" Mk2; My life as a Department of Work and Pensions Investigator?
     
  7. I wonder if it'll be serialized in the Times?

    The Hereford Times.
     
  8. You couldn't resist reading it could you? :D :D

    "I'm only a property developer!"
     
  9. Daft question for you. Why appear in silhouette on TV but appear without Harry Black in the printed press? :?
     
  10. Because he couldn't read the gravestone with Harry Black over his eyes?
     
  11. Look at the photo accompanying the article.
    The grave faces the footpath same as all the others on his row.
    There has been no slight against the man.
     
  12. But of course! Doh.
     
  13. Look at the photo accompanying the article.
    The grave faces the footpath same as all the others on his row.
    There has been no slight against the man.

    Picasso me thinks you need to look again at the photo. If you take the time to look and to read the atricle then you would realise that they are all buried the same way it just the headstone that is facing the wrong way. I don't think it states it in the story but they would also not allow him to be carried in through the main gates of the church so his friends and family had to pass him over the wall.

    Look before you leap my friend!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  14. By that way it's not cos i'm a real spotter it's just that my parents live in the village so i've visited the grave many times.
     
  15. And leapt in and done anything about this- or just looked?
    If the ******* don't get this sorted sharpish I'm sure a few of us can go and turn it around ourselves one day soon.