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SAS hero reveals horror of child sex abuse ordeal

#2
well said jack, to speak out like this guy takes a lot of guts.
i wish him all the best for his future and to his attacker i wish an eternity of hell
 
#4
Yeah hats off to the guy, he's came out of the ordeal a well balanced man. But I think I was in basic training with the bloke that abused him, right name, age and area of the country if it's the same bloke he was a big mouth who got found wanting. freaky!
 
#5
Good for him. Takes guts but at least these days the powers that be are prepared to do something.

Back in the dark ages of Blogg's Schooldays a grim faced headmater announced one morning that a pupil had been found dead at home following a tragic accident whilst he was "playing with some rope."

Soon after it was announced that one of the English teachers had been involved in a road accident and never returned, having decided to work overseas once recovered from extensive and serious injuries. The Headmaster failed to mention that he had no memory of the incident and so could simply not explain the fact that he appeared to have incurred the majority of his injuries some distance from his car nor the short length of scaffolding wrapped in electrical tape found near his senseless form.

General view was that he got off too lightly.
 
#6
There is a common reoccuring link between abusive childhoods and PTSD.
Early childhood trauma is a direct contributor to this injury. FACT.

Best wishes to the man a very brave bloke- he will now start to heal.
I for one wish him all the best.
 
M

Mr_Logic

Guest
#7
EAGLE1 said:
There is a common reoccuring link between abusive childhoods and PTSD.
Early childhood trauma is a direct contributor to this injury. FACT.

Best wishes to the man a very brave bloke- he will now start to heal.
I for one wish him all the best.
Eagle1

That interesting, I was not aware of that link. Do you have a source for that or could you point me in the right direction to the research that under-pins it? Is it just abusive childhoods or does it affect other types of experienced dramatic incident?

As to the subject of this thread, its good to see someone doing the morally right thing. Especially when he clearly could have taken more direct action.
 
#8
If you look in most books/articles/journals about PTSD you'll find it. Sexual abuse is probably the most common cause of PTSD in this country, though for many people who are abused it isn't often diagnosed until many, many years later.

You have to look at sexual abuse as one of any number of traumatic events that can cause PTSD, it isn't 'special' in any way. Just so happens it's the most common cause I've come across in my time as a psychiatric nurse (and that of my old consultant when we discussed this).

Any psychogically traumatic incident can be a precursor to PTSD, whether that's a traumatic labour, RTA, military service, sexual abuse, the list is long.
 
#10
I'm not doubting what happened to the SAS bloke for one minute, but doesn't it strike anyone as unfair that the alleged abuser has his name and details spread all over the papers, internet and probably TV from day one, whereas the alleged victim remains anonymous for 'legal reasons'? And it's not for reasons of sneaky beaky security.

Once the perpetrator is found guilty, fair enough, but it doesn't seem right that he is named and shamed in such a way beforehand.
 
#11
I see your point. However with cases like this it is possible the suspect is a repeat offender and it may encourage victims who have not spoken up to come forward if they see they are not alone in dealing with what has happened.
 
#12
Is the offender still alive(link did'nt work on my Stone Age pc)? If so, lock him in a room. With the ex-SAS bloke. and a bat. With nails in it...
 
#13
Here you go

SAS hero reveals horror of child sex abuse ordeal

By Evening Gazette


An SAS hero on secret operations in Afghanistan was also fighting his own war with his childhood memories of sex abuse, a court was told yesterday.

Teesside Crown Court was told that for more than 20 years the trooper, who cannot be named for legal reasons, had told nobody of the terrors he said began when he was nine and lasted until he was 15.

Prosecuter Richard Newbury told a jury that the 34-year-old, who joined the Army in 1990, had chosen to reveal the abuse because it was true.

The assaults stopped when he was big enough to fight back, but the pressure and stress sent him off the rails until he signed up at 18.

When Cleveland Police arrested his alleged abuser the man said that no such thing had happened and that they had got on well.


Former soldier Mark Mulgrew, 41, of Coleridge Gardens, Darlington, County Durham, denies four specimen charges of serious sexual assault and nine of indecent assault.


The 34-year-old SAS man told the jury: "I was in Afghanistan a couple of years ago, I was just laid on my bed and all the thoughts came back.


"I had a rifle by my bed and I thought 'I can finish this right now, I can just stick it into my mouth and pull the trigger and the job's a good one, it would all be over.


"Then I thought 'No, why should I, why not kill him?' But when I got back home I couldn't."


The soldier added: "When I came back from Afghanistan I initially told my wife what had happened.


"I wanted it to be dealt with but I did not know the best way to do it.


"Firstly, to give peace of mind to myself, but alternatively because that person had contact with children and until he was convicted I felt that children would be in danger."


He said he was nine when the sex abuse began and he was terrified.


"He must have been aware that he had a child lying under him crying, saying it hurts."


It ended at 15 when he was big enough to fight back, but then he went off the rails stealing motorcycles, bikes and large scale shoplifting. Each time he was placed on a court care order and then he was put in care for nine months.


He added: "Initially I felt it was one of my weaknesses, that I had allowed it to happen to me. I felt it was my fault. There was nobody I could go to. The events used to haunt me all the time, I had mood swings. When I was married I would go into a corner and my wife would say 'What's up with you?' And I couldn't tell anyone."


Proceeding.
I'm sure he could have set up the baseball bat scenario himself. The point is he never and it takes a much braver man to do what he did. Also it will be less likely to cause him further psychological problems.
 
#14
Awol said:
.............................but doesn't it strike anyone as unfair that the alleged abuser has his name and details spread all over the papers, internet and probably TV from day one, whereas the alleged victim remains anonymous for 'legal reasons'? And it's not for reasons of sneaky beaky security.

Once the perpetrator is found guilty, fair enough, but it doesn't seem right that he is named and shamed in such a way beforehand.
1. If the victim is a serving member of SF there will always be OPSEC / PERSEC issues.

2. It seems that a number of other victims have come forward, should they also be named? It seems there is sufficient quality and quantity evidence for the media and the court to feel they can name the perpetrator.

3. It might not have crossed the victim's mind, but someone will have recognised that his vetting, and hence his SF career would be at stake if there was any hint of fabrication on the part of the SF soldier. The question of vetting and integrity, whilst laughable to some, has been brought up in Court before.
 
#15
and of course...why would he lie?? What could he possibly gain by making it up and laying himself open like he has? No disrespect to any of you boys and girls on here but you have the armed forces way of looking at stuff,take the piss first,sympathise later so he was risking a whole bucket of crap if any one guessed who he was! Like you say,he has guts b the bucketload and i hope his abuser gets what's coming to him
 
#16
I think that a lot of the people who choose to go into the army are OTR from one thing or another, I know I was.

It wasnt the same thing as the bloke mentioned in this thread, and I wish him all the best, and hope that his family and friend's are helpfull and understanding, and support him in his dealing with what he has been through and what has still to be faced.

I personally think that such perp's are the lowest life form on the planet and naming and shaming them in the media is a warning to all, as to who they are and what they have done in the past and what they are capable of at the present and in the future. What concenting adult's do is there business, but kid's are off limit's period. They do deserve something, and not that what the PC legal system has in store for them. If they get a chance they re-offend, ruining another person's life, no there is only one form of punishment for such annimal's.

Toe
 
#17
toemag said:
I think that a lot of the people who choose to go into the army are OTR from one thing or another, I know I was....
At some point in your life - if you're lucky - it ceases to be that dirty, sordid, filthy little secret that you've kept to yourself all of those years, for which you blame yourself and, for a perverse reason, feel guilty about.

The trouble is, by sticking it in the darkest recesses of your mind, you think that you're dealing with it - only you're not, as it turns out. It manifests itself in other ways. For me, it was tormenting my (then) wife for bringing out feelings of trust and love that, hitherto, I'd kept myself from feeling, trusting no one; and then feeling vulnerable when that lovely person showed me that it was ok to have those feelings. Why I still find it difficult to be (metaphorically) backed into a corner, when the literal being backed into a corner and being presented with someone's slonger weaving its perverted way to your arse or mouth is still a too-vivid memory (and those that knew me back in Belize 77 might just realise why I reacted in the way that I did to those "fun and games" so beloved of the REs...)

God knows why it eventually tumbles out and why at a particular time. All I know is that it really is much better for you when it does; if only to make you realise that, just because you think of yourself in a derisory way because of it, those that love and care for you really don't think anything less of you. I certainly don't feel tainted, filthy, disgusting and guilty anymore; the only regret that I still have is that it took nigh on 40 years to find its way out into the open.

I guess this thread struck a chord and a big up to the SAS bloke for letting/getting it out. He did the right thing.
 
#18
DillonFlatBack said:
toemag said:
I think that a lot of the people who choose to go into the army are OTR from one thing or another, I know I was....
At some point in your life - if you're lucky - it ceases to be that dirty, sordid, filthy little secret that you've kept to yourself all of those years, for which you blame yourself and, for a perverse reason, feel guilty about.

The trouble is, by sticking it in the darkest recesses of your mind, you think that you're dealing with it - only you're not, as it turns out. It manifests itself in other ways. For me, it was tormenting my (then) wife for bringing out feelings of trust and love that, hitherto, I'd kept myself from feeling, trusting no one; and then feeling vulnerable when that lovely person showed me that it was ok to have those feelings. Why I still find it difficult to be (metaphorically) backed into a corner, when the literal being backed into a corner and being presented with someone's slonger weaving its perverted way to your arse or mouth is still a too-vivid memory (and those that knew me back in Belize 77 might just realise why I reacted in the way that I did to those "fun and games" so beloved of the REs...)

God knows why it eventually tumbles out and why at a particular time. All I know is that it really is much better for you when it does; if only to make you realise that, just because you think of yourself in a derisory way because of it, those that love and care for you really don't think anything less of you. I certainly don't feel tainted, filthy, disgusting and guilty anymore; the only regret that I still have is that it took nigh on 40 years to find its way out into the open.

I guess this thread struck a chord and a big up to the SAS bloke for letting/getting it out. He did the right thing.
Well said. I have also been in that lonely world that we men tend to live in after abusive childhoods. However the put up and shut up mentality never helps us to regain our power and move on. we try to survive by driving on and over compensating(becoming tougher). When we actually 'stop and think' about our pasts we can start to get angry at the right people.

Then we can take some positive action to restore the balance of power.
IE: Speak out and seek justice. Best wishes to you.
 

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