Sandhurst incident.

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mcphee1948

Old-Salt
Perhaps the problem in the Army nowadays, is that there's no really threatening outside enemy to focus on?
 
Whatever the back story, this is very, very sad.
That this can happen at any of the intake establishments should remind all of us to be more attentive.

RIP, Ma'am.
 

rifleair

War Hero
Whatever the ins and outs of what she may have done, someone reported her, does that person feel proud today?
 
Whatever the ins and outs of what she may have done, someone reported her, does that person feel proud today?
It's an unfortunate consequence of moral courage, having the integrity to do the right thing. The person reporting isn't the one who has done wrong and shouldn't be castigated for doing so.
 

rifleair

War Hero
According to the MOD she hadn't done anything wrong, and you can never tell whether the person reporting is 'doing the right thing' or settling a personal score. However they saw it at the time, my thought was, what will they be thinking now?
 
As this is with a coroner for investigation and a colleague who I may have known has lost her life please can we lock the thread until the facts have been released and next of kin know what happened rather than fuel speculation about what might have been.
 
It's an unfortunate consequence of moral courage, having the integrity to do the right thing. The person reporting isn't the one who has done wrong and shouldn't be castigated for doing so.
And you know this is to be incontrovertible fact....how?
For all we know, the "complainer/reporter" may well be a toxic little S.O.B.
Let the coroner & investigators do their jobs first.
 
And you know this is to be incontrovertible fact....how?
For all we know, the "complainer/reporter" may well be a toxic little S.O.B.
Let the coroner & investigators do their jobs first.
You misunderstand. I've explained the moral difficulty of applying moral courage as a general concept. If there's any relevance to this particular case, it's that it's unfair to guilt-trip someone for following the rules, particularly when, as you remind us, nobody on here has the remotest inkling of the full facts.
 
Whatever the ins and outs of what she may have done, someone reported her, does that person feel proud today?
Noone reported her.

Regardless Puttees is correct on the Moral Courage point.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk
 

rifleair

War Hero
If no one reported her how was she under investigation?
Moral courage or not, if you or anyone, for all the right reasons reports someone else who subsequently takes their own life, would you feel proud about your moral superiority or would you perhaps think that there may have been a better way of doing things. Like for instance preventing it happening in the first place.
There is another party here who could, and should have done the ' right thing'.
You may consider the death of a young girl as just collateral damage if the right thing has been done, I don't.
 
I wish the tories would devote more money to mental health services. A friend of mine who was a British lass from Devon nearly did theirself in as well
Was? what is she now?
 
Whatever the ins and outs of what she may have done, someone reported her, does that person feel proud today?
I make no comment about the incident at Sandhurst because, like the rest of us, I know virtually nothing about it.

What I will say is that people hardly ever take their own lives because of the circumstances in which they find themselves or due to minor stressors like trouble at work.

The vast majority of suicides occur because the victim is mentally ill but nobody around them knows. The symptoms of severe depression or some types of bipolar disorder can be very difficult to spot, especially if the victim has a quiet or introverted personality. In addition, the "stiff upper lip" mentality encourages sufferers to hide their symptoms and many of them are very good at doing this - until they can't do it any more.

During the fighting in Afghanistan, I believe there was a campaign in the army to teach soldiers about the symptoms of mental illnesses like PTSD so they could recognise it in their colleagues. There really needs to be a similar campaign to teach people how to identify mental illness in themselves.

Depressive illness distorts your perception of everything that is going on around you. What you think when you are depressed isn't real. Don't lose sight of the light at the end of the tunnel. The illness will pass.

Above all remember that suicidal thoughts mean that you are seriously ill. If you can't see a doctor immediately, call the Samaratins on 116123. The real tragedy of suicide is that it is often easily avoided. There is no need for people to die for want of a course of Prozac or a short stay in hospital.
 
If no one reported her how was she under investigation?
Moral courage or not, if you or anyone, for all the right reasons reports someone else who subsequently takes their own life, would you feel proud about your moral superiority or would you perhaps think that there may have been a better way of doing things. Like for instance preventing it happening in the first place.
There is another party here who could, and should have done the ' right thing'.
You may consider the death of a young girl as just collateral damage if the right thing has been done, I don't.
Who's to say that the events that led to her death had anything to do with the Army? It could be an external event such as an unfaithful boyfriend, death of a pet or a failed mortgage application.

The media has been digging to create a saleable story but everything at this stage is just speculation.

Let's wait for the results of the investigation before we start apportioning blame. Or perhaps you're trying to encourage a second suicide?
 
Who's to say that the events that led to her death had anything to do with the Army? It could be an external event such as an unfaithful boyfriend, death of a pet or a failed mortgage application.

The media has been digging to create a saleable story but everything at this stage is just speculation.

Let's wait for the results of the investigation before we start apportioning blame.
I agree.
This young lady's death could be down to multiple factors and not just Military ones.
Whatever the cause , it is a very sad time for all those concerned.
 
No one seems to have mentioned that the sad demise of this young lady maybe down to nothing more than natural causes. Let's wait for the coroner's report.


There's a grieving family involved, give them some space.
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Moral courage or not, if you or anyone, for all the right reasons reports someone else who subsequently takes their own life, would you feel proud about your moral superiority or would you perhaps think that there may have been a better way of doing things. Like for instance preventing it happening in the first place.
These two points aren't exclusive. Just because something might have been preventable, that doesn't make it wrong to report it after its happened.

The standard you walk past is the standard you accept. That's particularly important at RMAS where there's zero tolerance for bad discipline and integrity is expected.

That's not to say that someone necessarily reported her in this instance. It's a general point that applies to all types of bad discipline. The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.
 
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