SANDF News

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Just a place to throw the funnies that occur with this militia.

Starting off with this release of average ages.
Good to see they've understood diversity and inclusivity so have a token in the photo.

Minister discloses average age of SA infantry soldiers
Written by defenceWeb -
9th Sep 2020
148
sandf_jungle_warfare_training_20140324_1856922884.jpg

sandf_jungle_warfare_training_20140324_1856922884.jpg

Jungle training for infantry soldiers.

The infantry soldier has been and still is the mainstay of any landward force and as such is usually seen as young, fit and strong.
While the fit and strong appellations may apply to riflemen in the Infantry Formation of the SA Army, the young not so much.
Defence and Military Veterans Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula, answering a question in Parliament posed by fellow ANC parliamentarian, Tidimalo Legwase, said the average age of the full-time force infantry soldier was 38.
According to the Minister, soldiers in the SA Infantry Corps (SAIC) [incorrect as infantry is one of nine formations in the landward force, as per the official Department of Defence website] “are deemed to be members from the rank of rifleman up to lieutenant colonel. Members above the rank of lieutenant colonel are part of the SA Staff Corps (SA St C) and no longer part of SAIC, although their original mustering may have been in SAIC”.
She gave average ages for the different rank groups as rifleman 34, lance corporal 44, corporal 46, sergeant 48, staff sergeant 51, warrant officer (class one) 53, warrant officer (class two) 55, second lieutenant 33, lieutenant 36, captain 41, major 46 and lieutenant colonel 50.
 
Just a place to throw the funnies that occur with this militia.

Starting off with this release of average ages.
Good to see they've understood diversity and inclusivity so have a token in the photo.

Minister discloses average age of SA infantry soldiers
Written by defenceWeb -
9th Sep 2020
148
sandf_jungle_warfare_training_20140324_1856922884.jpg

sandf_jungle_warfare_training_20140324_1856922884.jpg

Jungle training for infantry soldiers.

The infantry soldier has been and still is the mainstay of any landward force and as such is usually seen as young, fit and strong.
While the fit and strong appellations may apply to riflemen in the Infantry Formation of the SA Army, the young not so much.
Defence and Military Veterans Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula, answering a question in Parliament posed by fellow ANC parliamentarian, Tidimalo Legwase, said the average age of the full-time force infantry soldier was 38.
According to the Minister, soldiers in the SA Infantry Corps (SAIC) [incorrect as infantry is one of nine formations in the landward force, as per the official Department of Defence website] “are deemed to be members from the rank of rifleman up to lieutenant colonel. Members above the rank of lieutenant colonel are part of the SA Staff Corps (SA St C) and no longer part of SAIC, although their original mustering may have been in SAIC”.
She gave average ages for the different rank groups as rifleman 34, lance corporal 44, corporal 46, sergeant 48, staff sergeant 51, warrant officer (class one) 53, warrant officer (class two) 55, second lieutenant 33, lieutenant 36, captain 41, major 46 and lieutenant colonel 50.


crop_Screenshot_20200909-145601.jpg


Is he recreating the end of Platoon, or just trying to see out from under his lid?


crop_Screenshot_20200909-150353.jpg
 
Just a place to throw the funnies that occur with this militia.

Starting off with this release of average ages.
Good to see they've understood diversity and inclusivity so have a token in the photo.

Minister discloses average age of SA infantry soldiers
Written by defenceWeb -
9th Sep 2020
148
sandf_jungle_warfare_training_20140324_1856922884.jpg

sandf_jungle_warfare_training_20140324_1856922884.jpg

Jungle training for infantry soldiers.

The infantry soldier has been and still is the mainstay of any landward force and as such is usually seen as young, fit and strong.
While the fit and strong appellations may apply to riflemen in the Infantry Formation of the SA Army, the young not so much.
Defence and Military Veterans Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula, answering a question in Parliament posed by fellow ANC parliamentarian, Tidimalo Legwase, said the average age of the full-time force infantry soldier was 38.
According to the Minister, soldiers in the SA Infantry Corps (SAIC) [incorrect as infantry is one of nine formations in the landward force, as per the official Department of Defence website] “are deemed to be members from the rank of rifleman up to lieutenant colonel. Members above the rank of lieutenant colonel are part of the SA Staff Corps (SA St C) and no longer part of SAIC, although their original mustering may have been in SAIC”.
She gave average ages for the different rank groups as rifleman 34, lance corporal 44, corporal 46, sergeant 48, staff sergeant 51, warrant officer (class one) 53, warrant officer (class two) 55, second lieutenant 33, lieutenant 36, captain 41, major 46 and lieutenant colonel 50.
Sure they didn't quote the figures for a British TA unit?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Is he recreating the end of Platoon, or just trying to see out from under his lid?

I think it's the moment that a heterosexual bloke realises that he's the prettiest bloke in the Mortar Platoon.
 
She gave average ages for the different rank groups as rifleman 34, lance corporal 44, corporal 46, sergeant 48, staff sergeant 51, warrant officer (class one) 53, warrant officer (class two) 55, second lieutenant 33, lieutenant 36, captain 41, major 46 and lieutenant colonel 50.

That is pretty drastic. I wonder what their fitness tests are like? And what the passing rate for them is?
 
That is pretty drastic. I wonder what their fitness tests are like? And what the passing rate for them is?

Pretty much all the comrades that got a seat on the gravy train, highly unlikely to ever deploy. The biggest challenge is waiting for pay day without falling asleep.

I see the token drew the short straw there and got the base plate.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Now it's the turn of the SAN and SAAF.

A near copy of the transcript:

South Africa has one 80-year-old plane left to patrol its seas​

South Africa’s navy and airforce do not have money to service or replace their scanty contingents of vessels and aircraft essential to protecting the country’s coastline.

This is because the South African National Defence Force has been burning through its budget with high employee costs biting into funding which should go towards servicing these vehicles and procuring new ones as the ANC cadres are fucking stealing it.

These vessels and maritime aircraft are needed to defend South Africa’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and promote Operation Phakisa — the government’s initiative to develop the “blue economy”.

They are crucial in tackling the transportation of illegal immigrants, contraband, drugs, weapons, animals, mined natural resources, and fishery resources.

“The obvious impact is we have no patrolling and protecting of our strategic sea route around the Cape, which carries bustling maritime traffic,” explains Democratic Alliance MP Kobus Marais.

“We also have no effective protection against many with intentions to abuse and strip our maritime resources and cannot meet our international obligations to patrol and protect the southern oceans and the islands in these seas.”

Marais said the biggest problem was disproportionate spending on staff remuneration. [Ed. And the ANC putting the cash into their personal accounts.}

“While the budget has been reduced every year, the cost of employees filling the pockets of Party members has become the single biggest stumbling block,” Marais said.

Marais explained that the government’s 2015 Defence Review Policy (2015DR) document provided a clear guideline that the budget must be allocated and spent as follows:

Cost of Employees (COE) – 40%
Operations and training – 30%
Equipment acquisition and maintenance – 30%
National Treasury required that employee numbers be slashed significantly to accommodate the spending above, but this has not materialised.

“COE has crept up every year to the extent that it accounts for 64% of the 2021/22 approved budget,” Marais said.
Employee numbers have only been marginally reduced from what was required to hit that target, from 75,000 to 73,000.
This means the overspend on COE will be close to R3 billion, and it will account for 69% of the allocated budget.
Marais explained the navy and air force were severely short-changed when it came to maritime capabilities.

Meanwhile, the South African Air Force (SAAF) only has one Dakota [Douglas C-47 Skytrain] aeroplane, because certain party members sold all the other upgraded TurboDaks to a chommie in another country and gooied the proceeds into their skyrockets.
The plane is more than 80 years old but needs to do maritime patrols, reconnaissance flights and other maritime flights.
“We urgently require the procurement of the most suited and best value maritime patrol aircraft.”

Other aeroplanes in the SAAF include two 60-year-old C130 cargo planes, which makes any sentient being wonder why all the others weren't serviced or were sold to maatjies, and cannot realistically assist with maritime duties. They are used for transporting soldiers and supplies within South Africa and to other African countries.

Marais said the Oryx and Rooivalk helicopters also needed to be upgraded to Mark II versions.


The South African Navy only has four frigates and three submarines at its disposal, and few of these are getting their required sea hours.

“Only one frigate is serviceable with the possibility of one more to be brought into service,” Marais said.
Of the submarines, only one is partially serviceable, the other two are far better at descending than reaching the surface ever again.

The costs for essential midlife upgrades of the frigates is close to R700m, while the submarines will cost about R660 million each.
In addition, the smaller strike crafts are at the end of their lives, Marais said.

Originally, there was a plan to procure both inshore patrol vessels and outshore patrol vessels, but due to budget constraints government sanctioned organised theft, this was amended to provide for only 3 IPVs. The first is only due for delivery this month.

Marais said the DoD and SANDF urgently needed to be repositioned and restructured.

“A disciplined SANDF is non-negotiable,” he said, but added, "and also non-attainable with the present government"
“We also must refocus our defence priorities to best deal with the current and future threats, which might imply getting rid of ‘nice to have’ structures, units and personnel, but keeping the twenty-seven year old tradition of pocketing the defence budget.”

Marais said part of this would include reducing the number of employees to between 50,000 and 55,000.
While he called for strong and decisive political and operational leadership to significantly change the government’s military objectives, he realised it was utterly pointless in attempting to change the thrust of the kleptocracy.
“If not, we might find ourselves only with a ‘water wing’ and not a navy we so desperately require.”
 

RaiderBoat

Old-Salt
Now it's the turn of the SAN and SAAF.

A near copy of the transcript:

South Africa has one 80-year-old plane left to patrol its seas​

South Africa’s navy and airforce do not have money to service or replace their scanty contingents of vessels and aircraft essential to protecting the country’s coastline.

This is because the South African National Defence Force has been burning through its budget with high employee costs biting into funding which should go towards servicing these vehicles and procuring new ones as the ANC cadres are ******* stealing it.

These vessels and maritime aircraft are needed to defend South Africa’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and promote Operation Phakisa — the government’s initiative to develop the “blue economy”.

They are crucial in tackling the transportation of illegal immigrants, contraband, drugs, weapons, animals, mined natural resources, and fishery resources.

“The obvious impact is we have no patrolling and protecting of our strategic sea route around the Cape, which carries bustling maritime traffic,” explains Democratic Alliance MP Kobus Marais.

“We also have no effective protection against many with intentions to abuse and strip our maritime resources and cannot meet our international obligations to patrol and protect the southern oceans and the islands in these seas.”

Marais said the biggest problem was disproportionate spending on staff remuneration. [Ed. And the ANC putting the cash into their personal accounts.}

“While the budget has been reduced every year, the cost of employees filling the pockets of Party members has become the single biggest stumbling block,” Marais said.

Marais explained that the government’s 2015 Defence Review Policy (2015DR) document provided a clear guideline that the budget must be allocated and spent as follows:

Cost of Employees (COE) – 40%
Operations and training – 30%
Equipment acquisition and maintenance – 30%
National Treasury required that employee numbers be slashed significantly to accommodate the spending above, but this has not materialised.

“COE has crept up every year to the extent that it accounts for 64% of the 2021/22 approved budget,” Marais said.
Employee numbers have only been marginally reduced from what was required to hit that target, from 75,000 to 73,000.
This means the overspend on COE will be close to R3 billion, and it will account for 69% of the allocated budget.
Marais explained the navy and air force were severely short-changed when it came to maritime capabilities.

Meanwhile, the South African Air Force (SAAF) only has one Dakota [Douglas C-47 Skytrain] aeroplane, because certain party members sold all the other upgraded TurboDaks to a chommie in another country and gooied the proceeds into their skyrockets.
The plane is more than 80 years old but needs to do maritime patrols, reconnaissance flights and other maritime flights.
“We urgently require the procurement of the most suited and best value maritime patrol aircraft.”

Other aeroplanes in the SAAF include two 60-year-old C130 cargo planes, which makes any sentient being wonder why all the others weren't serviced or were sold to maatjies, and cannot realistically assist with maritime duties. They are used for transporting soldiers and supplies within South Africa and to other African countries.

Marais said the Oryx and Rooivalk helicopters also needed to be upgraded to Mark II versions.


The South African Navy only has four frigates and three submarines at its disposal, and few of these are getting their required sea hours.

“Only one frigate is serviceable with the possibility of one more to be brought into service,” Marais said.
Of the submarines, only one is partially serviceable, the other two are far better at descending than reaching the surface ever again.

The costs for essential midlife upgrades of the frigates is close to R700m, while the submarines will cost about R660 million each.
In addition, the smaller strike crafts are at the end of their lives, Marais said.

Originally, there was a plan to procure both inshore patrol vessels and outshore patrol vessels, but due to budget constraints government sanctioned organised theft, this was amended to provide for only 3 IPVs. The first is only due for delivery this month.

Marais said the DoD and SANDF urgently needed to be repositioned and restructured.

“A disciplined SANDF is non-negotiable,” he said, but added, "and also non-attainable with the present government"
“We also must refocus our defence priorities to best deal with the current and future threats, which might imply getting rid of ‘nice to have’ structures, units and personnel, but keeping the twenty-seven year old tradition of pocketing the defence budget.”

Marais said part of this would include reducing the number of employees to between 50,000 and 55,000.
While he called for strong and decisive political and operational leadership to significantly change the government’s military objectives, he realised it was utterly pointless in attempting to change the thrust of the kleptocracy.
“If not, we might find ourselves only with a ‘water wing’ and not a navy we so desperately require.”
THIS is what happens when you turn a First World country over to a bunch of ******* Terrorist children. Enjoy the fruits of your Mandiba inspired labor.
 
Now it's the turn of the SAN and SAAF.

A near copy of the transcript:

South Africa has one 80-year-old plane left to patrol its seas​

South Africa’s navy and airforce do not have money to service or replace their scanty contingents of vessels and aircraft essential to protecting the country’s coastline.

This is because the South African National Defence Force has been burning through its budget with high employee costs biting into funding which should go towards servicing these vehicles and procuring new ones as the ANC cadres are ******* stealing it.

These vessels and maritime aircraft are needed to defend South Africa’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and promote Operation Phakisa — the government’s initiative to develop the “blue economy”.

They are crucial in tackling the transportation of illegal immigrants, contraband, drugs, weapons, animals, mined natural resources, and fishery resources.

“The obvious impact is we have no patrolling and protecting of our strategic sea route around the Cape, which carries bustling maritime traffic,” explains Democratic Alliance MP Kobus Marais.

“We also have no effective protection against many with intentions to abuse and strip our maritime resources and cannot meet our international obligations to patrol and protect the southern oceans and the islands in these seas.”

Marais said the biggest problem was disproportionate spending on staff remuneration. [Ed. And the ANC putting the cash into their personal accounts.}

“While the budget has been reduced every year, the cost of employees filling the pockets of Party members has become the single biggest stumbling block,” Marais said.

Marais explained that the government’s 2015 Defence Review Policy (2015DR) document provided a clear guideline that the budget must be allocated and spent as follows:

Cost of Employees (COE) – 40%
Operations and training – 30%
Equipment acquisition and maintenance – 30%
National Treasury required that employee numbers be slashed significantly to accommodate the spending above, but this has not materialised.

“COE has crept up every year to the extent that it accounts for 64% of the 2021/22 approved budget,” Marais said.
Employee numbers have only been marginally reduced from what was required to hit that target, from 75,000 to 73,000.
This means the overspend on COE will be close to R3 billion, and it will account for 69% of the allocated budget.
Marais explained the navy and air force were severely short-changed when it came to maritime capabilities.

Meanwhile, the South African Air Force (SAAF) only has one Dakota [Douglas C-47 Skytrain] aeroplane, because certain party members sold all the other upgraded TurboDaks to a chommie in another country and gooied the proceeds into their skyrockets.
The plane is more than 80 years old but needs to do maritime patrols, reconnaissance flights and other maritime flights.
“We urgently require the procurement of the most suited and best value maritime patrol aircraft.”

Other aeroplanes in the SAAF include two 60-year-old C130 cargo planes, which makes any sentient being wonder why all the others weren't serviced or were sold to maatjies, and cannot realistically assist with maritime duties. They are used for transporting soldiers and supplies within South Africa and to other African countries.

Marais said the Oryx and Rooivalk helicopters also needed to be upgraded to Mark II versions.


The South African Navy only has four frigates and three submarines at its disposal, and few of these are getting their required sea hours.

“Only one frigate is serviceable with the possibility of one more to be brought into service,” Marais said.
Of the submarines, only one is partially serviceable, the other two are far better at descending than reaching the surface ever again.

The costs for essential midlife upgrades of the frigates is close to R700m, while the submarines will cost about R660 million each.
In addition, the smaller strike crafts are at the end of their lives, Marais said.

Originally, there was a plan to procure both inshore patrol vessels and outshore patrol vessels, but due to budget constraints government sanctioned organised theft, this was amended to provide for only 3 IPVs. The first is only due for delivery this month.

Marais said the DoD and SANDF urgently needed to be repositioned and restructured.

“A disciplined SANDF is non-negotiable,” he said, but added, "and also non-attainable with the present government"
“We also must refocus our defence priorities to best deal with the current and future threats, which might imply getting rid of ‘nice to have’ structures, units and personnel, but keeping the twenty-seven year old tradition of pocketing the defence budget.”

Marais said part of this would include reducing the number of employees to between 50,000 and 55,000.
While he called for strong and decisive political and operational leadership to significantly change the government’s military objectives, he realised it was utterly pointless in attempting to change the thrust of the kleptocracy.
“If not, we might find ourselves only with a ‘water wing’ and not a navy we so desperately require.”

Well, 75000 pretty much captive votes for the cANCer to go along with all the seat warmers in the civil service and police/govt and local authorities who owe their paychecks to the party and would never vote any other way to keep the bucks coming in and those lovely increases every year for doing nothing.
 
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