Safety nuts bar heroes cake sale

Discussion in 'Charities and Welfare' started by ukdaytona, Mar 10, 2009.

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  1. OK its from the Stun but H&S/PC really is getting out of hand now.....

    HEALTH and safety jobsworths were blasted yesterday after soldiers’ mums were forced to scrap two charity cake sales — in case someone got HURT.

    Proud mothers and grans had planned to set up stalls at separate shopping centres to boost the Help for Heroes fund.

    But they were then told to fork out for special insurance to cover them for accidents or POISONING — which would have gobbled up all their profits.

    Last night the ruling was blasted as half-baked as both cake sales bit the dust. Organiser Margaret Taylor, whose two sons served in the forces, fumed: I couldn’t believe it.

    Margaret was told insurance for each stall run by her MAGS group — Mums and Grandmothers of British troops in Iraq and Afghanistan — would cost 75.

    As well as supplying a Public Liabilities Insurance Certificate she was told to provide a picture of her proposed stalls — plus something called a Portable Appliance Test Certificate.

    Stunned Margaret had no choice but to call off the cake sales at the Houndshill Centre in Blackpool, and the Teanlowe Centre in Poulton, Lancs.

    The stalls were due to have been set up just days after the funeral of local hero Darren Smith, 28 — a Royal Marine shot in Afghanistan last month.

    Margaret raged: Darren risked life and limb fighting — yet we have to insure against someone getting injured by a cake.

    Local councillor Ron Bell, an ex-Royal Marine, said: Over-regulation is getting in the way of common sense. Frontline soldiers have far more than cakes injuring them to worry about.

    Belinda Mitchell, of the Sun-backed Help for Heroes campaign, said: It’s political correctness gone mad. We put on a bake sale last year, raising 5,400. They said as long as we put up signs warning products contained nuts, we were fine.

    A spokesman for the Houndshill Centre said: The chances of an accident are very slim, but they need to be covered in case anyone is injured at or near the stalls. There is also a risk of allergies or poisoning. People could sue.

    Management of the Teanlowe were unavailable for comment.