Safestyle uk

#81
Effendi and Co - while you're whizzing your new windows in - don't forget to check that lintels are there - if
there are none fit one. Oh and BTW you seemed to ignore plaster thickness and squareness of the brickwork -
disaster surely awaits.
Wasn't it the 1930/ 40's houses, had no lintels above the windows ?
 
#83
NO, call a licenced electrician, JIB registered, DIY electrics is not a safe option, ( Retired sparky, 50 years)
Ummmm, I qualified at college as a sparky in septic-land.

Effendi and Co - while you're whizzing your new windows in - don't forget to check that lintels are there - if
there are none fit one. Oh and BTW you seemed to ignore plaster thickness and squareness of the brickwork -
disaster surely awaits.
Never had a problem with the building inspector. It's not rocket science.
 
#84
Vinnie - Properties up to the 70's regularly built without lintels - timber frames were designed to carry the load.
Most older council property will be like that.
I've seen current new builds without lintels & shoite windows.
Older houses ( even new "dot & dab" finished) can have 3cm plus plaster finishes on the inside to cover a multitude of sins.
 
#85
Vinnie - Properties up to the 70's regularly built without lintels - timber frames were designed to carry the load.
Most older council property will be like that.
I've seen current new builds without lintels & shoite windows.
Older houses ( even new "dot & dab" finished) can have 3cm plus plaster finishes on the inside to cover a multitude of sins.
I hate dot & dab. As you say it hides a multitude of sin's.

How are they getting around the use of lintels in new build? My understanding is that if you have an opening in a wall and there is structure above it then there needs to be a lintel. I had to put loadsa lintels in when fitting British Gas recessed meter boxes for a new gas supply when changing over properties from oil fired heating to gas.
 
#86
I sought a quote from them to replace my soffits and guttering. The rep was classic pressure sales, even when I told him I was aware of his sales technique he just couldn’t break out of it. I made a few polite indications I’d had enough and he should leave, which he ignored. This was about 15 years ago.
hes still not in your living room trying his pitch is he ?
 
#87
Effendi - you might also ask how did they get away with the cladding on Grenfell ! People not doing their jobs
correctly & people looking the other way - it's horrendous. A hell of a lot of new builds are poorly built - but they
are dressed up to look pretty and folks were queuing up to buy them. Once they're out of the 10 year guarantee -
if it falls down it's the homeowners problem !
BTW I quoted for quite a bit of tower block panel work 15 years ago - the correct panel like "Trespa" is horrendously
expensive (relatively) - cheap panel looks similar but has no fire rating. Guess who gets the business.
I found quoting for local authority work with correct product - you very seldom get the work.
 
#88
Can't be bothered to read it all, but the basics of getting some new pvc windows.
First off avoid all the nationals, you're paying for salesman and adverts, quality of fitters a very variable, a lot are ones not good enough for other companies. Go small, go local, go on recommendations from trustworthy sources. Pvc is dirt cheap even without trade discount. Flash a tape over your openings draw the style of the window, find a local Trade frame supplier for Windows and glass stick a 150mm cill on all, get a quote, you have a rough material cost so you see how much labour is being added, when you get quotes for supply and fit. A basic two pane kitchen window with one side opener is roughly 150 quid, supply only, glazed without any discount. Doors, rear, patio, French fine. Front door, get a composite, pvc ones are gash. Composite doors are not cheap, supply only can be 1k, but they are worth it. Almost all new build domestic dwellings use them, they are far more secure. Even if you just get everything done and do the front door at a later date it's worth it.
 
#89
Effendi - you might also ask how did they get away with the cladding on Grenfell ! People not doing their jobs
correctly & people looking the other way - it's horrendous. A hell of a lot of new builds are poorly built - but they
are dressed up to look pretty and folks were queuing up to buy them. Once they're out of the 10 year guarantee -
if it falls down it's the homeowners problem !
BTW I quoted for quite a bit of tower block panel work 15 years ago - the correct panel like "Trespa" is horrendously
expensive (relatively) - cheap panel looks similar but has no fire rating. Guess who gets the business.
I found quoting for local authority work with correct product - you very seldom get the work.
I saw the quality of materials being specified was going downhill before I left the UK - they seem to be following the US model for new builds more and more. The life of a house in the US is measured in a 50 year term with new roofing expected every 10 - 15 years dependant on climate zone. I spent my time fixing up uk village houses built in the 70's, in the main solidly built, but dated and in need of new heating, bathrooms, kitchen and windows.

I had polypipe want me to be their regional go to installer for projects and with a mate got involved in a council quote for installing new boilers and heating systems. Disaster. They might as well have written the hints for backhanders and free lunches on a billboard outside the council offices. Neither of us needed the hassle so they went with Bruce's firm of spur wearing cowboys.
 
#90
Leveller - You ain't getting a decent basic window for £150 - you'll get a "el cheapo" window for £150 !
Composite doors - again most are not very good. A upvc door with all glass in is just as secure if its got
a 3 star barrel fitted. Composite and UPVC doors use exactly the same frame & lockstrip.
A composite door is basically 2 x 2.5mm GRP skins filled with foam - look good (until they fade) but that's about it. Most of them let drafts through and aren't worth the money - btw standard composite doors are < 500 trade it's the fancy glass that whacks the price up.
Moral of the story - buy from a decent window supplier & stick to a bog standard composite door
 
#92
Find yourself a good local company that has been in business for lots of years.

We use a family run company who are about 5 miles from us and have done a couple of jobs. They have been reasonably priced and good quality.

Would not touch Anglian, Safestyle, Everest etc.
 
#93
Effendi you work for Haynes don't you?

Though you forgot the 'simply remove' and 'reassembly is the reverse of removal'
:)

But yep, you're right its easy, hard bit is getting the old one out which is where the recip saw, chisels, drill bits, hammers, wrecking bars and swearing come in. Though having said that in my last house I removed a bedroom window that was held by a single 8" nail through the sill into the brickwork.

Being a belt and braces type the replacement had 4 frame fixings into wedges in the cavity and 2 more into the brickwork it as sat on. I allow more gap around the frame as I've yet to come across brickwork that wasn't slightly pissed and its a PITA when you slide the shiny new frame in place and watch it fit perfectly everywhere apart from one brick that's sticking 8 mil out and stopping the frame.

Oh and expanding foam, adds a good day onto finishing the job while it cures but stops the wind sneaking in, then just trim the foam add your facia & sealant and stand back and admire your work.

Followed by being led inside by SWMBO who will explain that the room needs decorating now.
The reciprocating saw and breaker bar are your best friends.

There is a trick with removing the opener, hard to describe, easier to demonstrate - I watched a bloke doing it and it seemed pretty nifty. You open the window wide as possible and engage the casement stay at the furthest out hole. Then you put your breaker bar just above the top hinge and lever whilst grabbing the top furthest out edge of the window and pull down - something like that, have a go, you have the opener out in about 5 seconds.

I put in the bottom spacers under the sill, got position, marked and drilled the side holes then removed the frame. Then I would more or less empty a silicone cartridge on the bottom of the brick opening, leave the spacers there - make sure there are no spaces or holes for water or bugs to get in. Then put the window frame back in the hole onto the silicone to make a nice weather tight seal.

Gap around the window. I was shitting myself the first time that I did it, measure, measure again, then measure again just to make sure, and just in case measure it again. I used to hold my spirit level up to the brick sides to check for square and straight. Most I would allow around 3mm each side (6mm overall) some though if there was a wobble in the brick work I would allow some more. Always fitted, never had a problem. One thing to remember is that you can use a plane to take down the edge of the PVC frame a bit, just like wood, if you need to.

A nifty trick is to get some quarter round PVC edge trim around the 10mm size. Cut it to size for the top and sides of the outside of the window and fix it with silicone. It hides any wibbly wobbly's and gives a nice look and finish.

Make sure the window is upright with a level, or the top is leaning forward just a bit to make sure water runs off the sill. Lean it back and water will pool on the sill. On that note: I always used to put a bead of silicone between the sill and the frame then screw the sill onto the frame - just to make sure it is weather tight.

Final job is to filler/plaster inside around the window and re-paint.

SAFETY: Wear safety glasses and work gloves when removing or handling glass.

STOOPID ALERT: As it was mentioned up top always check you have lintels.

BUILDING REQUIREMENTS: There are opener and window height requirements and you should really get a building inspector in to sign them off. It is not difficult to check the requirements, I never had a problem getting mine signed off.

It is honestly a doddle. If you have one small window tucked away give it a try on that and go from there.

The last couple of houses I did in the UK I needed to go upmarket and used the Bowater Halo profile. A right bastard to work with as the PVC is so bloody thick and strong, but the whole look and feel of the finished product was different and definately added value.
 
#94
I can g
Leveller - You ain't getting a decent basic window for £150 - you'll get a "el cheapo" window for £150 !
Composite doors - again most are not very good. A upvc door with all glass in is just as secure if its got
a 3 star barrel fitted. Composite and UPVC doors use exactly the same frame & lockstrip.
A composite door is basically 2 x 2.5mm GRP skins filled with foam - look good (until they fade) but that's about it. Most of them let drafts through and aren't worth the money - btw standard composite doors are < 500 trade it's the fancy glass that whacks the price up.
Moral of the story - buy from a decent window supplier & stick to a bog standard composite door
I can get Rehau or Veka for that cost with standard hard coat glass. We use steel lined composite with aluminium or steel frame. It's PAS24, SBD, can be fire rated to 30/30 or 60/60. PVC is the ass end of the industry that's why it's cheap.
 
#95
I need 2 sash windows in Stockton so will e doing my research based on advice on here
 
#96
I need 2 sash windows in Stockton so will e doing my research based on advice on here
Out of our area I'm afraid however sash are more expensive due to the slide mechanism, even more expensive if you need to remove sash box. We charge £650 a window and £100 for box removal - there are some SILLY prices out there - I';ve seen £3500 a window - no prizes for guessing who!
 
#97
@Bogie_Bear

Thank you. That was what I thought. Still we have picked up good advice on here.
 

Longlenny

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#99
I have had both Anglian and Everest round for quotes. The building is an old school built in 1861 of local stone, it stands in a conservation area so the windows have to be wooden. the quotes were for 36 windows, 450mm x 1450mm and one window 2000mm x 2450mm. Anglian quoted £59,550.00, Everest quoted £75100.00, neither of these figures are mistyped. After I received the Everest quote they came back to me with a 42 percent discount which was turned down, they have since left me alone. After I turned down Anglians effort they rang me and said they were doing a fifty percent offer on all old quotes, he then asked me how much they had quoted, I told him just over 59 and a half k, there was then a silence and then he said, no, and hung up.

I am currently looking at a family firm from the West Mids who I saw at the Homebuilding Show at the NEC. I will report back.
 
I have had both Anglian and Everest round for quotes. The building is an old school built in 1861 of local stone, it stands in a conservation area so the windows have to be wooden. the quotes were for 36 windows, 450mm x 1450mm and one window 2000mm x 2450mm. Anglian quoted £59,550.00, Everest quoted £75100.00, neither of these figures are mistyped. After I received the Everest quote they came back to me with a 42 percent discount which was turned down, they have since left me alone. After I turned down Anglians effort they rang me and said they were doing a fifty percent offer on all old quotes, he then asked me how much they had quoted, I told him just over 59 and a half k, there was then a silence and then he said, no, and hung up.

I am currently looking at a family firm from the West Mids who I saw at the Homebuilding Show at the NEC. I will report back.

Try Leamore windows, a mid size company, from wallsall, they done my gaff, Very reasonable, excellent build quality, good after sales service, over the last 2 years or so, they have done £20k's worth of work. No problems with them at all, turn up on time, no extras, no hidden charges, clean up after themselves. worth a call.
01922- 473737.
 

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