sad news , 5 yo girl killed by Pit Bull on New Years day

#1
I find it incomprehensable that anybody would own such a dog, The Girl's Uncle will have to live with this and the recriminations from his family and her Parents for years to come, I personally would find it hard to forgive if I was the Father, I would have felt like killing the Uncle for being responsable for this.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/6222319.stm


a sad loss and of course condolences to the families.
 
#2
RIP little angel.

I agree semper, I do not understand why people insist on keeping these animals. Regardless of the dogs own nature, the violent and vicious side of them is in the breed itself, something that never truly goes away.
I personally would never forgive the owner of one these animals. I think it is a totally irresponsible act. Especially when the animals are likely to come into contact with children.
I feel there should be a stronger government standing on this issue.
They are renowned for being violent yet people still keep them, perhaps a joint effort by the police and the RSPCA to get rid of these animals would be an idea, or at least to keep control of them.
An impossible idea I know, but incidents such as these really do get to me.
My sincere condolences to those affected.
Edited due to forgetful nature.
 
#3
RIP indeed.

And a shame for the dog too. (I am thinking that as the dog handlers didn't want to handle it, it was shot between the eyes humanely rather than put to sleep).

The uncle should have been there with it, with all the fireworks etc.

I hope the uncle who was alledgedly responsible for the dog also gets hamanely put to sleep and those that didn't remove it from him when it had previously acted up.

It has long been a bone of contention for me that the poor animal pays the ultimate price whilst its owner gets away scot free.
 

missy

Old-Salt
#4
condolences to family!
Can't believe that the child's uncle knowly brought that dog into the house, knowing it was dangerous! Those kinds of dog were originally bred for fighting surely that would indicate - not good pets!!
 
#5
RIP

how many children need to be killed by dogs untill the leaders of our "great" country see that we need licence on dogs, and not just any old licence like a drving licence, where it states what size and type of dog you can have?

or force owners to take their dog to training when they are a puppy to gain a licence...
 
#6
The adults should be prosecuted under The Children Act 2004 and under Common Law for the Duty of Care they owe to the child and leaving a dangerous dog within the definition of the Dangerous Dog Act 1991 unsupervised with a young child.

Someone should be jailed and served with a lifetime ban on dog ownership
 
#7
Condolences to the family on a sad loss at the start of the year.

Hopefully this will serve as a warning to others who have dogs and avoid further loss of young lives in these circumstances.

fastmedic
 
#8
Poor little thing, I can't imagine what the parents must be going through.

The sad thing is that it is human behaviour that causes these dogs to kill/maim. Excessive interbreeding can cause the smallest dogs to be nasty, Westhighland Terriers being prime example. I've known two owners 'overlook' snapping and biting (resulting in a nasty hand injury) despite kids being in the home. And let's face it, if Yorkshire Terriers were big dogs, they'd be on the dangerous dogs list with the aggression they have.

I was seeing a bloke once who had a Pitbull, he was a lovely dog and I never felt in danger around him...would I trust him in a crowd or with kids? Not a chance in hell, neither would his owner. Sensible owners don't take risks like that. Labradors are supposed to be gentle dogs, but I know of a puppy that is being babied, to the point where three grown adults take it in turns to stay up all night with it 'because he cries'...my friend won't visit the house any longer because the puppy(about 12 weeks old now I think) is already starting to bite through jealousy. Thank god they're going to puppy training classes, I only hope they have this ridiculous behaviour beaten out of them :evil: Idiots like that make my blood boil...
 
#9
In my humble opinion, anybody that owns a pitbull or any other animal on the banned list, is an irresponsible idiot and should be fined/jailed for breaking the law. Not just told they cant keep animals for a year.
 
#10
chocolate_frog said:
RIP indeed.

And a shame for the dog too. (I am thinking that as the dog handlers didn't want to handle it, it was shot between the eyes humanely rather than put to sleep).

The uncle should have been there with it, with all the fireworks etc.

I hope the uncle who was alledgedly responsible for the dog also gets hamanely put to sleep and those that didn't remove it from him when it had previously acted up.

It has long been a bone of contention for me that the poor animal pays the ultimate price whilst its owner gets away scot free.
Apparently, the owner had been warned six months ago about the ferocity of his pet. Link.

What a way to begin the year eh, poor little mite.
 
#11
Tragic. Poor bairn.

I love dogs, and don't have any kids. But I still would'nt even consider a pitbull as a pet. These dogs are simply too aggressive; not their fault, it's down to the stupid cnuts who started breeding them in the first place.

There is no excuse for owning a Pitbull. If you need a guard dog, buy a GSD from a reputible dealer. And make sure you train it correctly.

If money and space is no object, buy yourself an English Mastiff.

Anyone who buys a large, agressive dog to make themselves look "hard" is a d1ckless pencilneck in dire need of a good, savage shoeing.

End rant.
 
#12
R.I.P. little angel sleep peacefully
what an awful way for any family to end the year why do people continue to own these type of dogs! We have a very soft lab and i still will not leave it alone with my 3 year old girl you just never know!!
 

Auld-Yin

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#13
One of the things that pi sses me off about this tragic affair, is that, even it the offending dog is put down, the chav will probably just go out and get another, and be well within his 'rights' to do so.
 
#14
We do not yet have any photographs of the dog so the "pit bull" may be journalistic licence. Some may say "Does it matter what sort of dog it was?" IMHO it does. Those who do not have pit bull type dogs will shrug and say "My dog is not a pit bull. It would not do that" Unfortunately, any dog can be vicious. Either latently just waiting for a trigger or on the spur of the moment. There are no bad dogs, just bad owners. They can all - even little varieties we think of as ladies' lap dogs - inflict serious injury on adults and even more so on kids.
Training and licensing of owners is unlikely to solve the problem. Mr Chav with his Staffy knows best of course. What is needed is for us all to realise that a dog can go off at any time and to take such steps as to ensure that risks are known, evaluated and prepared for. I have a well trained shorthaired pointer. When we have house guesta, she is in her crate at night so that we do not have them and dog coming into contact during those night time trips to the loo for example. If I leave the guests alone in a room, the dog comes with me. She is introduced to any kids by me and not left to work out what they are doing in 'her' home. If they are the sort of kids that see dogs as toys, she goes into her crate.
We had the Hunt in the village this midday. The hounds were loose in a big crowd but the hunt guys had a very careful eye on them.
Long post - I'm sorry but we saw the hysteria that led to the nonsense that is the Dangerous Dogs Act and this terrible incident could start off more such knee jerk reactions.
 
#15
i agree ORC,as a child i was attacked by a scottie dog of all things,whereas my aunt has a soft as tripe(and VERY well trained Rottie)! A dog's a dog,its difficult to circle 'dangerous' breeds because they can ALL be dangerous if they have stupid irresponsible owners.
 
#16
put a severe downer on my day.... why oh why would anyone want to own such a thing... surely following the dangerous dogs act 1991 all pit bull things must be nutered and most dead???
poor wee soul.... fcuk I'm angry
 
#17
Sorry Red Cap, I cant really see your comparison with hunting hounds, which as far as I am aware are 'proper' working dogs and these vicious , bred for fighting dogs. but in the part of the country where this tragic incident took place, there is a particular problem with , for want of a better word, chav scum buying and having 'pitt bull' style dogs. They roam around with the dogs scaring the cr@p out of everyone decent and even setting the dogs on people or their innocent dogs that they are out walking.

It is regularly reported in the local press and they have even started a campaign to try and get the ownership of these dogs properly regulated.-

heres the link for the local press report;
http://icliverpool.icnetwork.co.uk/...objectid=18354214&siteid=50061-name_page.html

We have such a problem with these types of dogs literally going berserk that my work partner has had to shoot 3 of them himself, he is animal destruction trained.
God help the parents of that poor girl but how many times are we going to see such REGULAR attacks before the Gov does something about it and not like that arrse of legislation like the Dangerous Dogs Act...
 
#18
bigbird67 said:
i agree ORC,as a child i was attacked by a scottie dog of all things,whereas my aunt has a soft as tripe(and VERY well trained Rottie)! A dog's a dog,its difficult to circle 'dangerous' breeds because they can ALL be dangerous if they have stupid irresponsible owners.
Its a cliche, but I blame the parents...

Dogs and small children do not mix, and certainly should never be left alone unsupervised, even if parent/guardian is just in the next room/indoors from garden etc;

The chavs who go out and get these huge dogs make me sick. When I think of all the nonsense that surrounds ownership of firearms, and in particular the type/calibre of firearm, and all the legal hurdles I have to jump through, and just for the privilege to be considered a potentially 'murdering paedo nut job' by the filth, where is the controls on what basically is a poorly domesticated wolf, with a mind of its own?
 
#19
My parents own a staffordshire bull terrier, they've had it for years and it's one of the best dogs I have ever seen around small children - to be fair though, it's thick as mince.

I'm one of 6 (yes, 6) children and it's never so much as growled at any of us, including my son and two nieces who are all under 6 years old....and trust me, our household when we were growing up was enough to send any dog berserk.

Put any other dog near it however and it goes mental. Outside of the house it has to be a leash all the time.

However, I have just google imaged a pitbull and I for one can't tell the difference between that and a staff.

Sorry to be thick here, but how can you tell the difference? Or is a staffordshire bull terrier classed as a dangerous dog too???
 
#20
jason_2000x said:
RIP

how many children need to be killed by dogs untill the leaders of our "great" country see that we need licence on dogs, and not just any old licence like a drving licence, where it states what size and type of dog you can have?

or force owners to take their dog to training when they are a puppy to gain a licence...
A terrible loss and awful way to start the new year.

Licensing is a good idea - but very costly and difficult to implement, in any event if this tragic event had not occured how many people would be crying "poilce state" etc if such a practice were to be implemented.

Futhermore - there are children that die from accidental knife wounds, air rifle shootings, playing with matches, scalding and all manner of other unforeseeable occurances. It is difficult to draw a line on what should be licensed and what should not.

I don't own a large dog, or a terrier breed - but banning something from being owned does not necessarily remove the danger associated with it, look at the Firearms amendments in the post-Dunblane incident. In any event the Dangerous Dogs Act was, and is a very poor piece of legislation introduced in an attempt to pander to popular public opinion - it is bad law and will not prevent young lives being lost.
 

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