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Russian top manager of engine building corporation detained in Italy at US request.

The story looks similar to detention of Huawei top manager in Canada.
It's interesting how Moscow will react. To please @scalieback I use Reuters as a source.
Alexander Korshunov, director for business development at Russia's United Engine Corporation (UEC), was detained at an airport in Naples on Aug. 30 after Washington issued a warrant for his arrest.

UEC produces engines for civil and military aircraft as well as power turbines. Russian state conglomerate Rostec, which owns the engine maker, said Korshunov was innocent of any wrongdoing as did UEC, Russian news agencies reported.
Mr.Korshunov is accused in industrial espionage, in unauthorised use of GE know-how.
Speaking at an economic forum in the Russian Far East, Putin said the arrest looked like it was motivated by what he called unfair competition.
"This is a really bad practice," Putin said. "In this case we're dealing with attempts at dishonest competition."
Russian designed PD-14 avia engine is on the last phase of its development and looks as a strong competitor on respective market.
Putin said UEC had developed a new Russian engine and concluded a contract with an Italian consulting firm. "It's a normal global practice. It's open commercial work with European partners," said Putin.

Reuters article is too short and contains nothing about the charges. So let's look at another source
Two men from Italy and Russia have been charged with trying to steal trade secrets from an American aviation company, U.S. prosecutors said Thursday.

The Justice Department unsealed a criminal complaint Thursday accusing the two of plotting to steal intellectual property, including engineering patterns and designs for equipment used in jet engine systems, from Ohio-based GE Aviation.
So at this moment nothing have been stolen. Allegedly the pair only planned to steal GE intellectual property.
The complaint charges Alexander Yuryevich Korshunov, a Russian national, and Maurizio Paolo Bianchi, an Italian national, with one count each of trade secret theft. Korshunov was arrested last week at an airport in Italy.

Prosecutors say the scheme unfolded after Bianchi, a former director at an Italian subsidiary of GE Aviation who was responsible for business in China, Russia and Asia, left the company. He joined another company that had a contract with the subsidiary of the Russian state-owned company, United Engine Corp., where Korshunov worked.
Bianchi is accused of hiring three current or former employees of GE Aviation's Italian subsidiary to do consulting work on jet engine accessory gearboxes, which are used to transfer power from a jet airplane to other power systems, and to create a technical report.
Engines for civil aviation are commercial products and can be freely bought on the market and/or as a part of planes. So respective gear boxes were at disposal of Russian constructors, designers, engineers long ago along with similar devices on other engines. Creating new, efficient engine it is important to examine and compare existing solution realised in similar engines. So consultations with respective specialists are very helpful. The gear boxes in questions were not stolen but appeared in hands of Russian developers quite legally.
Though ... Italy could follow Canada and detain the Russian top managers for a long period. So one could expect mirror detentions in Russia or even much more tough measures.
 
The story looks similar to detention of Huawei top manager in Canada.
It's interesting how Moscow will react. To please @scalieback I use Reuters as a source.

Mr.Korshunov is accused in industrial espionage, in unauthorised use of GE know-how.

Russian designed PD-14 avia engine is on the last phase of its development and looks as a strong competitor on respective market.


Reuters article is too short and contains nothing about the charges. So let's look at another source

So at this moment nothing have been stolen. Allegedly the pair only planned to steal GE intellectual property.


Engines for civil aviation are commercial products and can be freely bought on the market and/or as a part of planes. So respective gear boxes were at disposal of Russian constructors, designers, engineers long ago along with similar devices on other engines. Creating new, efficient engine it is important to examine and compare existing solution realised in similar engines. So consultations with respective specialists are very helpful. The gear boxes in questions were not stolen but appeared in hands of Russian developers quite legally.
Though ... Italy could follow Canada and detain the Russian top managers for a long period. So one could expect mirror detentions in Russia or even much more tough measures.
The issue seems to be that a GE executive is alleged to have taken GE property when he left the company and sold it to a subsidiary of a competitor of GE.

Copying a competitor's designs on the other hand is perfectly legal, provided you don't infringe upon their patents (in which case it is a civil matter).

I worked with a very large and well known foreign multi-national. The American customers (also large and well known multi-nationals) would not do business with us unless we could prove that we were getting our hands on all of our competitors' latest products and dissecting them in order to copy their best features. So our R&D department had to put on a big song and dance show for them with display boards of our competitor's products in various states of disassembly in order to prove it to them. It was a waste of time for us, as none of their products were as advanced as our own, and we were well aware of what was in them. It was however a box-ticking exercise for the customers' auditors, as their business evaluation procedures said that their suppliers had to reverse engineer their competitors' products instead of relying strictly on their own R&D.

There is a fine line between doing that however and buying a competitor's drawings under the table. The latter is frowned upon.

This sort of thing none the less is very common in American business. It usually involves senior business executives or successful salesmen who leave their company with inside information and go to work with a competitor. Most commonly it is another company in the US they go to, but lately they have started going abroad, usually in China or Taiwan. The most sensitive information is generally not the actual technology, but rather market evaluations, sales and pricing plans, and customer contacts.

Whether Korshunov had any involvement in this though is something that we don't know. The connection to him is very indirect and if he was aware of the details of this then he had a great deal more knowledge of the day to day operations of his company than any Western business executive that I have met (except for one). However, I don't rate Mr. Korshunov's chances very highly whether he is guilty or not. The Americans have been getting very creative with their use of law recently, and don't seem to require much in the way of evidence to get a conviction.
 
The Americans have been getting very creative with their use of law recently, and don't seem to require much in the way of evidence to get a conviction.
Not true. They require comprehensive evidence that removing the competition would help their businesses' chances in the international market.
 

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