Russian movie - Calling KGB_resident

#1
Watching Fyodor Bondarchuk's movie '9th Company' on C4. Excuse the Anglocised Cyrilic spelling/writing.

Set in the Soviet era about AFG. Given the fact that USSR troops were from all the Soviet nations and some of the actors in the movie are ethnically non-Russian, are the actors accents all Russian (e.g Moscow/Petersburg) or are they from other former Soviet Republics (e.g. Kazakhstan etc)?

Interesting film though.
 
#3
Good luck getting ahold of KGB_Resident.

He is too busy directing strategic long range bomber flights to the English coast.
 
#4
Suddick said:
... are the actors accents all Russian (e.g Moscow/Petersburg) or are they from other former Soviet Republics (e.g. Kazakhstan etc)?
:?

I'm intrigded as to why anyone would want to know this...
 
#5
I thoroughly enjoyed the film 9th Coy last night.

Laughed my socks off at snow white - I thought she was a mong or albino at first..... ahem I'm a sick puppy, however moving on.....

Did anyone notice that one of the Mujihadeen (Muajihadeen) looked very like a septic with the mirrored aviation sunglasses in the end battle scenes?

I wondered if this was a subtle dig at the american "involvement" at the time.

Anyone else notice this?...
 
#6
"The film is based on a real battle that took place at Hill 3234 early 1988, during the last large-scale Soviet military operation "Magistral". In the movie, only one soldier from the company survives and the company is said to have been "forgotten" by the military command because of the Soviet withdrawal. But in reality, the story was different.

The 9th Company, 345th Guards Airborne Regiment was pinned down under heavy fire on "Hill 3234" between 7 and 8 January 1988. They managed to stop several attacks by an estimated 250−500 Mujahideen. The company lost 6 men. Another 28 out of the total 39 were wounded. Two of the killed soldiers were posthumously awarded the golden star of the Hero of the Soviet Union. The unit was in constant communication with headquarters and got everything the regimental commander, Colonel Valery Vostrotin, could provide in terms of ammunition, reinforcements, and helicopter evacuation of the wounded.[1]

The film received a mixed reaction from the veterans of that war, who pointed to a number of inaccuracies, but nevertheless, judging by ticket sales, was embraced by the general public..." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9th_Company

http://www.9thcompany.com/ ----- 9th Company official site in English
 
#7
Its always the case with movies based on real events....

While trying to tell the story they use "director's license" to make it more cinematic and the people who were there get understandably hacked off at the direction the film takes.

While researching Band of Brothers they unearthed the story which became saving Private Ryan (real name changed).

BoB included one of my relatives Sgt. Don Malarkey and he agrees that the directorial slant occurs, but points out that unless you were there, and even if you were, you can never really portray what it was like.

Look out for his book which is being released in July this year.

Can anyone help me with my arabic? Is it "Mujahideen" for easy english pronunciation or "Mua-JIHAD-een" as I was brought up to beleive???

Many thanks :-D
 
#9
Sparky2339 said:
Can anyone help me with my arabic? Is it "Mujahideen" for easy english pronunciation or "Mua-JIHAD-een" as I was brought up to beleive???

Many thanks :-D
My pleasure: Arabic: مجاهدين‎, :D
 
#10
Arabic: مجاهدين‎, muǧāhidīn
Mujahideen is also transliterated from Arabic as mujahedeen, mujahedīn, mujahidīn, and mujaheddīn. According to Wiki.
 
#11
Thank You Hackle and Domovoy :-D

Domovoy i sprayed my cuppa tea (NATO) all over my screen with your first response - bstard - hence the slow reply, it was doon the keyboard bloody everywhere!!!

Thanks for the laff :-D

I grew up speaking Libyan Arabic n as long as you smoke 60 cigs a day, cough like a camel you've got the accent!!

I'm still laughing yet - Shuchran gazilan qwice qwice khateer!! pmsl :-D
 
#12
Sparky2339 said:
Its always the case with movies based on real events....

While trying to tell the story they use "director's license" to make it more cinematic and the people who were there get understandably hacked off at the direction the film takes.

While researching Band of Brothers they unearthed the story which became saving Private Ryan (real name changed).

BoB included one of my relatives Sgt. Don Malarkey and he agrees that the directorial slant occurs, but points out that unless you were there, and even if you were, you can never really portray what it was like.

Look out for his book which is being released in July this year.

Can anyone help me with my arabic? Is it "Mujahideen" for easy english pronunciation or "Mua-JIHAD-een" as I was brought up to beleive???

Many thanks :-D
Malarky is releasing a book? Awsome! As a fellow Oregonion I've always wanted to meet him.


Anyway, directoral license is common, and almost unavoidable. Band of Brothers is less guilty. We all know the worst offenders (U-571, Casaulties of War, Mark of Cain, etc)
 
#13
I've this film on DVD for a while now and part of the extras are some interviews with members of the Company and it's former CO, they all seemed to say that it was pretty much as it was. Much better film than that 'Come and See'.
 
#14
jack-daniels said:
I've this film on DVD for a while now and part of the extras are some interviews with members of the Company and it's former CO, they all seemed to say that it was pretty much as it was. Much better film than that 'Come and See'.
I thought that come and see was crap! But the Partisans in the woods did look good.Just watched 9th company on my mums/step-Dads 50 inch telly with surround sound was ******* great! I thought the troops portrayed in 9th company were from Siberia?
 
#15
Lewis said:
jack-daniels said:
I've this film on DVD for a while now and part of the extras are some interviews with members of the Company and it's former CO, they all seemed to say that it was pretty much as it was. Much better film than that 'Come and See'.
I thought that come and see was crap! But the Partisans in the woods did look good.Just watched 9th company on my mums/step-Dads 50 inch telly with surround sound was * great! I thought the troops portrayed in 9th company were from Siberia?
They were Siberian if I remember rightly as they all got called up together. The worst thing about that 'Come and See' was the lingering face shots, what the fcuk was that all about!! Apparently there's another one called 'Star', anyone seen that one?
 
#16
Airfix said:
Suddick said:
... are the actors accents all Russian (e.g Moscow/Petersburg) or are they from other former Soviet Republics (e.g. Kazakhstan etc)?
:?

I'm intrigded as to why anyone would want to know this...
I suppose I'm wondering if it was accurate. After all, we have all heard Sean Connery's 'Oirish' accent etc. I find UK/USA films sometimes get this so wrong it detracts from the film itself.

I remember reading something about Stalin having a strong Caucasian accent and being mocked for it (behind his back). However, to me, it doesn't sound any different to Putin for example. Not being a Russian speaker and not having spent any time there, I wondered if film makers have a sort of Russian RP that actors use or whether, like 'The Way Ahead' regional accents were used to show that it was the whole nation that was at war.

Lewis and Jack D seem to be saying that the troops were Siberian. That would answer the point about whether the accents were all the same. However, it begs the question whether the accent was Siberian.

Note to self - Get a life.
 
#17
jack-daniels said:
Lewis said:
jack-daniels said:
I've this film on DVD for a while now and part of the extras are some interviews with members of the Company and it's former CO, they all seemed to say that it was pretty much as it was. Much better film than that 'Come and See'.
I thought that come and see was crap! But the Partisans in the woods did look good.Just watched 9th company on my mums/step-Dads 50 inch telly with surround sound was * great! I thought the troops portrayed in 9th company were from Siberia?
They were Siberian if I remember rightly as they all got called up together. The worst thing about that 'Come and See' was the lingering face shots, what the fcuk was that all about!! Apparently there's another one called 'Star', anyone seen that one?
Yeah and it was just wierd! If the Star is the one i think it is its very very good about a group of Soviet snipers behind the lines then its a cracker.
 
#18
Suddick said:
I suppose I'm wondering if it was accurate. After all, we have all heard Sean Connery's 'Oirish' accent etc. I find UK/USA films sometimes get this so wrong it detracts from the film itself.

I remember reading something about Stalin having a strong Caucasian accent and being mocked for it (behind his back). However, to me, it doesn't sound any different to Putin for example. Not being a Russian speaker and not having spent any time there, I wondered if film makers have a sort of Russian RP that actors use or whether, like 'The Way Ahead' regional accents were used to show that it was the whole nation that was at war.

Lewis and Jack D seem to be saying that the troops were Siberian. That would answer the point about whether the accents were all the same. However, it begs the question whether the accent was Siberian.

.
USSR was a multiethnic country (more then 100 nations), hence lots of accents. The strongest ones -- Caucasian (Georgian, Azerbaijani, Armenian, etc.) and Central-Asian. As for Siberian accents, they do tend to overuse the sound "o" and shorten certain vowels, other then that it's not much different from central Russia. One of my aunties live in Novosibirsk and I can't say that her accent draws my attention.
 
#19
Ooops!!!!....... :oops:

"My Bad" as they say......

Canny bleev I posted that on arrse by mistake - nuthn embarassing just blew my "cover"....

PM to Chief Joseph on the subject of Don Malarkey's book. If he hasn't read the post I'm sure everybody that did will be able to tell him what it said.

Time to change Corps AND not read/reply on ARRSE when on vodka therapy

:D
 
#20
the "a" is pronounced long and takes the stress, a better transliteration would be:

mu-jaa-hid-een.

It is from the same root as Ji-haad, as mentioned previously.
 

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