Russian Courses

#1
Nowadays I'm a plod and we have a lot of people from the Baltic and I quite fancy learning Russian.

I've started with a few phrase books and the like and I can tell the buggers when they're nicked and tell 'em to shut when they're whining in the cells.

Anyone from the Loughborough crowd can point the way to some good learning material? I've got the "Goon" as one of our interpreters and he's helpful but I need a bit more to get me going in the right direction.

TIA
 
#4
Ta! any other thoughts on good ways of cracking the grammar bit? Always been a problem for me.

Or is there just no easy way? I know, typical Relay Op, I want the easy way every time but I'm prepared to buckle down if there isn't one :)
 

Zofo

Old-Salt
#5
Once you've sorted out what the letters are, it begins to get a bit easier. The courses take it slowly step by step through the grammar. Take one case at a time and understand why if functions the way it does. If you have your goon, practise with him and get him (or her) to go through it with you. Practical usage is the best way of getting on with it. It is learning by rote - a lot of different endings though - plenty of exceptions to the rule but if taken slowly and not like Lobo then no problems. The Lobo course was exactly the same (bar the trade training and beastings!) as a year 1 Uni course.
PM if you need anything further!
Zofo
 
#7
Speedkuff said:
Nowadays I'm a plod and we have a lot of people from the Baltic and I quite fancy learning Russian.
Would it not be more diplomatic to learn Latvian, Lithuanian and Estonian?

msr
 
#9
Good point about Lit/Lat/Est. I'm like the community Bobby for the former sovs... ooooh! the PC demon's are going to get me!! in my area.

Whilst I have a few phrases, Sveiki! Paldies etc,I'm finding that Russian is the one to use especially as most of our Lats originate from Latgale province and tend to be russophones.

I must admit I like 'em all as a bunch. The Poles tend to have a very wicked sense of humour and the whole lot all drink like squaddies on payday and don't yarp too much if you get 'em bang to rights.
 
#10
They don't Yarp much cos in their country, they get roughed up by the Miliz....
 
#11
Um yes, so I understand...

Funny thing is now that I have picked a reasonable grasp of basic Russian, I keep getting asked if I'm Polish which I'm not.

For those of you wot have done the language proper, is this common for Brit's when speaking Russian, do we sound Polish? Or is it just me for some daft reason?

SK
 
#12
Speedkuff said:
Um yes, so I understand...

Funny thing is now that I have picked a reasonable grasp of basic Russian, I keep getting asked if I'm Polish which I'm not.

For those of you wot have done the language proper, is this common for Brit's when speaking Russian, do we sound Polish? Or is it just me for some daft reason?

SK
You might get a better response to your questions if you ask in the Int Corps forum - they have all of the linguist nowadays.
 
#13
Speedkuff said:
Um yes, so I understand...

Funny thing is now that I have picked a reasonable grasp of basic Russian, I keep getting asked if I'm Polish which I'm not.

For those of you wot have done the language proper, is this common for Brit's when speaking Russian, do we sound Polish? Or is it just me for some daft reason?

SK
Yeah, English-type Brits have a distinctive approach to some of the Russian sounds, particularly the "r", but also hard and soft consonants, which can sound more Polish. Oddly, Scottish-type Brits make hugely convincing Russians. Go figure.
 
#14
Soooooo, it then follows that if I shlur like Sean Connery in Krasnaya Okjabre, then I'll shound more convinshing..?

Should I lean to the Edinburgh or Glescae sound or might a light light Teuchter brogue do the job?

:?
 
#15
Speedkuff said:
Soooooo, it then follows that if I shlur like Sean Connery in Krasnaya Okjabre, then I'll shound more convinshing..?

Should I lean to the Edinburgh or Glescae sound or might a light light Teuchter brogue do the job?

:?
Этого года неяркое лето.
В маленьких елках бревенчатый дом.
Август, а сердце еще не согрето.
Минуло лето... Но дело не в том.

Рощу знобит по осенней погоде.
Тонут макушки в тумане густом.
Третий десяток уже на исходе.
Минула юность... Но дело не в том.

Старше ли на год, моложе ли на год,
дело не в том, закадычный дружок.
Вот на рябине зардевшихся ягод
первая горсточка, словно ожог.

Жаркая, терпкая, горькая ярость
в ночь овладела невзрачным кустом.
Смелая зрелость и сильная старость -
верность природе... Но дело не в том.

Сердце мое, ты давно научилось
крепко держать неприметную нить.
Все бы не страшно, да что-то случилось.
В мире чего-то нельзя изменить.

Что-то случилось и врезалось в души
всем, кому было с тобой по пути.
Не обойти, не забыть, не разрушить,
как ни старайся и как ни верти.

Спутники, нам не грозит неизвестность.
Дожили мы до желанной поры.
Круче дорога и шире окрестность.
Мы высоко, на вершине горы.

Мы в непрестанном живем озаренье,
дышим глубоко, с равниной не в лад.
На высоте обостряется зренье,
пристальней и безошибочней взгляд.

Но на родные предметы и лица,
на августовский безветренный день
неотвратимо и строго ложится
трудной горы непреклонная тень.

Что же, товарищ, пройдем и сквозь это,
тень разгоняя упрямым трудом,
песней, которая кем-то не спета,
верой в грядущее, словом привета...

Этого года неяркое лето.
В маленьких елках бревенчатый дом.


All the way from Bonnie Scotland :roll:
 
#16
Summat about small houses in summer in the woods in August and erm...umpty tumpty shadows and erm stuff.... right

I tend to slow down a little after old favourites such as "Vuy pod arriestum!" and "Pakazheetya Ruki... seyches!!"

LoL

BuistraBraselieti aka SK :wink:
 
#17
One of the best series of language books is the Hugo "...in 3 months" series. they give you the basics of the grammar in logical steps. I have not seen the russian one,but the one for another language remained my quick reference work throughout an 18 month course and beyond. For Russian the definative reference grammar is still Wade, but you wouldn't want to learn from it. Try the Hugo, your library should be able to get you a copy if you ask them nicely. Alternatively there is a trio of books under the title "Ruslan 1,2 and 3" - odly enough- http://www.ruslan.co.uk/rcontent.htm. the book 3 only came out late last year and is very up to date. there are audio materials and workbooks. They are very easy to work from and have some good cultural content too. If you want more info on them then PM me.

edited to add Ruslan series available on Amazon
 
#19
For me, there are two differences between polish and russian pronounce:
more hissing sounds (mnogo shipyashih zvukov)
accent on last syllable (udarenie na poslednem sloge)

Произношение тех, у кого английский язык - родной, всегда можно отличить по звуку "Р".
Это я к тому, что русский вряд ли примет англичанина за поляка.

А что, у вас опять стали доплачивать за знание русского языка?
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top