Running?

I use Polar Rs300. Works fine with chest strap. However will always give 1 doolally reading around 45 min stage. E.g. keeping constant 140 bpm and will suddenly read 214 then back to normal . Polar are known for it apparently.
 
I use Polar Rs300. Works fine with chest strap. However will always give 1 doolally reading around 45 min stage. E.g. keeping constant 140 bpm and will suddenly read 214 then back to normal . Polar are known for it apparently.
I was looking at second hand polar as against second hand Garmin 310, both about the same on eBay. Anyone else got experience of either?
Also anyone able to tell me how blood pressure compares/ is linked to heart rate? Heart rate is the same as pulse? Or diastolic blood pressure reading? With a tendency to high blood pressure I want to train fora marathon without causing myself a stroke!
 
First 10k in about 10 years a week Sunday. Going for my last distance run tomorrow then ramping to the event....
 
Well, last distance run pre race done this afternoon, it was warm, but cooler than it has been.

Tracking on the phone screwed Up, but knowing the distance was about 10.5km, my 10k time was sub 55 minutes. Very happy with that!
 
We (Wor Lass and me) redid our MAF test, but on the treadmill this time, which I think is the most sensible way to do it. It's flat and the variables are more controllable.

What is the MAF Test? - Dr. Phil Maffetone

We warmed up over 20 minutes (it takes us that long), and then we reset the running machine and ran 5k at our MAF heart rates.

Wor Lass got 33 minutes something and I got 29 minutes 14 secs. Wor Lass is a lot fitter than me aerobically, she beat me at the Newport Marathon by 17 minutes, so I was surprised my MAF result was better. But she's had a really busy day, whereas I had a couple of hours chill before going to the gym, so maybe that explains her result?

I did the same test last year, after a long period of low-heart-rate training (not long prior to an ultra marathon) and did the 5k in 25 minutes; so my aerobic fitness has declined since then.

Anyway, we'll redo it in a few weeks to see what the difference is.
Why has your aerobic fitness declined, have you had a break from MAF training? 8 min/mile is very good at MAF pace, how long to get there?
 
Why has your aerobic fitness declined, have you had a break from MAF training? 8 min/mile is very good at MAF pace, how long to get there?
It was on a treadmill at zero gradient, which is easier than a road, so don't take the pace as a literal road equivalent.

And it's probably taken about a 18 months when I first got interested in the Mafetone method (from the book Primal Endurance). Inspired by Wor Lass at the Brecon Ultra in Nov 16 (46 miles over some tough terrain), I fancied a shot of it in Nov 17 and started running. I'd done a little bit, maybe 10 to 15 miles a week prior, so it was almost a couch to ultra marathon in a year.

After a long period of fairly strict low-heart-rate-training, around early November 17, I ran a 5k personal best, which surprised me because I'd done no speed work what-so-ever. I found myself - at one point - in the lead (which isn't me), and I finished 4th, which isn't me either. And I felt strong; like I was just cruising too, not my usual 'balls out; Ribena Man look.

But after the ultra in November, I recovered and then bored with MAF training did a lot of races and 'black hole training' (which is the kind of speed you gravitate to when you just run; it's too fast to just stimulate your aerobic fitness effectively, and too slow to stimulate your anaerobic fitness). And my diet wasn't great too (a lot of carbs in the form of sugar; I'm a chocolate and doughnut addict).

So I think the combination of too much anaerobic running and a high carb diet negatively impacted my aerobic fitness.

I'm still not doing the Mafetone Method strictly, but perfectionism never got anything done, in my experience.

I plan to keep on doing the MAF test every 3 or 4 weeks to gauge how I'm doing and test and adjust as necessary.
 
MAF works. Adding in the right balance of speed and strength workouts is the tricky part.
I do enjoy a race, so I plan to just have a base building phase till June, and then start racing every two-or-three weeks and do no other speedwork, and see how that pans out.

However, I do lift weights, three times a week and according to Phil Mafetone in his Big Book of Endurance Training, that counts as an anaerobic work out. And he discourages it during base building periods. He (or Mark Sissons) suggest something called 'slow weights' as an alternative, but that's not for me.

So, as I say, I'm not doing it perfectly because I'm unwilling to give up the weights. And I like the odd sugar binge at the weekend too.

I'm weak.
 
We did a MAF test today, on the treadmill. This is where I warm up for 20 minutes, then reset the treadmill to zero, and then run 5k with a heart rate no higher than 133 (my MAF heartrate which is 180 minus my age when I first started this).

The first time I did it was on the 9 May and it took 29 mins 14 secs.

Today it was 26 mins and 16 seconds.

So I'm nearly 3 minutes faster - at the same heart rate - over 5k, than I was a month ago.

Wor Lass has had nearly a four minute improvement in her time, though she's doing more volume than me; she's training for an ultra marathon in the Peak District (you need volume for this to be effective).

This increase in aerobic fitness is also translating into faster 5k parkrun times also (two PBs in a row).

No speedwork (yet). It's like magic.

I plan to keep on doing the MAF test and when that starts to plateau, then add a little speedwork.

Oh, and what's even better is that I feel great; no niggles; everything is working just as it should; even my plantar faciitis has naffed off after about 18 months of niggling me. Reduced risk of injury is one of the benefits to this training style.
 

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