Running?

I use Polar Rs300. Works fine with chest strap. However will always give 1 doolally reading around 45 min stage. E.g. keeping constant 140 bpm and will suddenly read 214 then back to normal . Polar are known for it apparently.
 
I use Polar Rs300. Works fine with chest strap. However will always give 1 doolally reading around 45 min stage. E.g. keeping constant 140 bpm and will suddenly read 214 then back to normal . Polar are known for it apparently.
I was looking at second hand polar as against second hand Garmin 310, both about the same on eBay. Anyone else got experience of either?
Also anyone able to tell me how blood pressure compares/ is linked to heart rate? Heart rate is the same as pulse? Or diastolic blood pressure reading? With a tendency to high blood pressure I want to train fora marathon without causing myself a stroke!
 
First 10k in about 10 years a week Sunday. Going for my last distance run tomorrow then ramping to the event....
 
Well, last distance run pre race done this afternoon, it was warm, but cooler than it has been.

Tracking on the phone screwed Up, but knowing the distance was about 10.5km, my 10k time was sub 55 minutes. Very happy with that!
 
We (Wor Lass and me) redid our MAF test, but on the treadmill this time, which I think is the most sensible way to do it. It's flat and the variables are more controllable.

What is the MAF Test? - Dr. Phil Maffetone

We warmed up over 20 minutes (it takes us that long), and then we reset the running machine and ran 5k at our MAF heart rates.

Wor Lass got 33 minutes something and I got 29 minutes 14 secs. Wor Lass is a lot fitter than me aerobically, she beat me at the Newport Marathon by 17 minutes, so I was surprised my MAF result was better. But she's had a really busy day, whereas I had a couple of hours chill before going to the gym, so maybe that explains her result?

I did the same test last year, after a long period of low-heart-rate training (not long prior to an ultra marathon) and did the 5k in 25 minutes; so my aerobic fitness has declined since then.

Anyway, we'll redo it in a few weeks to see what the difference is.
Why has your aerobic fitness declined, have you had a break from MAF training? 8 min/mile is very good at MAF pace, how long to get there?
 
Why has your aerobic fitness declined, have you had a break from MAF training? 8 min/mile is very good at MAF pace, how long to get there?
It was on a treadmill at zero gradient, which is easier than a road, so don't take the pace as a literal road equivalent.

And it's probably taken about a 18 months when I first got interested in the Mafetone method (from the book Primal Endurance). Inspired by Wor Lass at the Brecon Ultra in Nov 16 (46 miles over some tough terrain), I fancied a shot of it in Nov 17 and started running. I'd done a little bit, maybe 10 to 15 miles a week prior, so it was almost a couch to ultra marathon in a year.

After a long period of fairly strict low-heart-rate-training, around early November 17, I ran a 5k personal best, which surprised me because I'd done no speed work what-so-ever. I found myself - at one point - in the lead (which isn't me), and I finished 4th, which isn't me either. And I felt strong; like I was just cruising too, not my usual 'balls out; Ribena Man look.

But after the ultra in November, I recovered and then bored with MAF training did a lot of races and 'black hole training' (which is the kind of speed you gravitate to when you just run; it's too fast to just stimulate your aerobic fitness effectively, and too slow to stimulate your anaerobic fitness). And my diet wasn't great too (a lot of carbs in the form of sugar; I'm a chocolate and doughnut addict).

So I think the combination of too much anaerobic running and a high carb diet negatively impacted my aerobic fitness.

I'm still not doing the Mafetone Method strictly, but perfectionism never got anything done, in my experience.

I plan to keep on doing the MAF test every 3 or 4 weeks to gauge how I'm doing and test and adjust as necessary.
 
MAF works. Adding in the right balance of speed and strength workouts is the tricky part.
I do enjoy a race, so I plan to just have a base building phase till June, and then start racing every two-or-three weeks and do no other speedwork, and see how that pans out.

However, I do lift weights, three times a week and according to Phil Mafetone in his Big Book of Endurance Training, that counts as an anaerobic work out. And he discourages it during base building periods. He (or Mark Sissons) suggest something called 'slow weights' as an alternative, but that's not for me.

So, as I say, I'm not doing it perfectly because I'm unwilling to give up the weights. And I like the odd sugar binge at the weekend too.

I'm weak.
 
We did a MAF test today, on the treadmill. This is where I warm up for 20 minutes, then reset the treadmill to zero, and then run 5k with a heart rate no higher than 133 (my MAF heartrate which is 180 minus my age when I first started this).

The first time I did it was on the 9 May and it took 29 mins 14 secs.

Today it was 26 mins and 16 seconds.

So I'm nearly 3 minutes faster - at the same heart rate - over 5k, than I was a month ago.

Wor Lass has had nearly a four minute improvement in her time, though she's doing more volume than me; she's training for an ultra marathon in the Peak District (you need volume for this to be effective).

This increase in aerobic fitness is also translating into faster 5k parkrun times also (two PBs in a row).

No speedwork (yet). It's like magic.

I plan to keep on doing the MAF test and when that starts to plateau, then add a little speedwork.

Oh, and what's even better is that I feel great; no niggles; everything is working just as it should; even my plantar faciitis has naffed off after about 18 months of niggling me. Reduced risk of injury is one of the benefits to this training style.
 
I've got a couple of free places for a gnarly non-stop 100 miler in the Brecon Beacons next year, so I'm kind of working on my endurance with a view to running it. You get about 40 hours to complete the event and when I saw this years competitors at mile 64, they were looking smashed. It has a 75% DNF rate (did not finish). I think the first year, due to the weather, only one finished.

I've got about 11 months to get ready for it, but I'm not sure if I'm disciplined enough to do train appropriately for it. I live with a fairly experienced ultra runner, so I know how to eat, sleep and train for it; whether I can or not is a different question. I've done a 46 mile ultra in the Brecons and that hurt enough. I'm 49 years old very shortly, so no spring chicken.

Anyway, with that in mind I did 15 miles over the Wye Valley yesterday and five hours of hiking in the Beacons today; up some pretty big slogs. I used 'cheat sticks' for the first time; they helped on the climbs.

I'm just going to build up my base fitness with lots of long slow runs, lots of hiking, and chuck in a tiny amount of ultra-high intensity training (like 10 x 100 meter sprints - balls out - with good recovery in-between, or all-out hill sprints for 10 to 12 seconds, x 10).

I do a fair bit of lifting in the gym, so general strength isn't a problem.

I also eat low carb (have done for nearly two years), so don't need to rely on glycogen for fuel.

If anyone's got any tips or tricks, particularly around tabbing long distances (which is what I suspect I'll be doing) over unforgiving terrain, I'm all ears!
 

Goatman

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I stumbled round my 50th Parkrun yesterday in six minutes slower than my PB on an utterly flat course.

Still chuffed though, having left hospital in a wheelchair in April....slowly slowly catchee minkee :) :dance::meditate:
 
I've got a couple of free places for a gnarly non-stop 100 miler in the Brecon Beacons next year, so I'm kind of working on my endurance with a view to running it. You get about 40 hours to complete the event and when I saw this years competitors at mile 64, they were looking smashed. It has a 75% DNF rate (did not finish). I think the first year, due to the weather, only one finished.

I've got about 11 months to get ready for it, but I'm not sure if I'm disciplined enough to do train appropriately for it. I live with a fairly experienced ultra runner, so I know how to eat, sleep and train for it; whether I can or not is a different question. I've done a 46 mile ultra in the Brecons and that hurt enough. I'm 49 years old very shortly, so no spring chicken.

Anyway, with that in mind I did 15 miles over the Wye Valley yesterday and five hours of hiking in the Beacons today; up some pretty big slogs. I used 'cheat sticks' for the first time; they helped on the climbs.

I'm just going to build up my base fitness with lots of long slow runs, lots of hiking, and chuck in a tiny amount of ultra-high intensity training (like 10 x 100 meter sprints - balls out - with good recovery in-between, or all-out hill sprints for 10 to 12 seconds, x 10).

I do a fair bit of lifting in the gym, so general strength isn't a problem.

I also eat low carb (have done for nearly two years), so don't need to rely on glycogen for fuel.

If anyone's got any tips or tricks, particularly around tabbing long distances (which is what I suspect I'll be doing) over unforgiving terrain, I'm all ears!
Ease up on the weights. Ultra runners are stick thin for a reason. Every pound excess, is one pound you'll have to carry for 100 miles. While running.

To retain strength with losing weight, do lots of fast reps of whatever weights you do, and build up big numbers. It'll help.
 
Reading all this I will be changing my running. I've not ran for a few years, more like 8, after I did my Achilles' tendon on the Muller 10k, two weeks or so after the London Marathon. I've been running after work, with some of my colleagues, but mainly junk miles. My pulse has been slow, as my natural pace is faster than them, but it slows me down instead of going at 7 Min mile pace and then wonder why I'm knackered after a few miles.
I'm running the Shawbury 10k on Sunday. For some reason I think I'll be on my old pace, but I really doubt the results will back that up. For some reason I do not like a race where you can see miles ahead and how far there is left to go.

I'll get the race out the way and look at proper training and keeping the pulse low.

RP.
 
Reading all this I will be changing my running. I've not ran for a few years, more like 8, after I did my Achilles' tendon on the Muller 10k, two weeks or so after the London Marathon. I've been running after work, with some of my colleagues, but mainly junk miles. My pulse has been slow, as my natural pace is faster than them, but it slows me down instead of going at 7 Min mile pace and then wonder why I'm knackered after a few miles.
I'm running the Shawbury 10k on Sunday. For some reason I think I'll be on my old pace, but I really doubt the results will back that up. For some reason I do not like a race where you can see miles ahead and how far there is left to go.

I'll get the race out the way and look at proper training and keeping the pulse low.

RP.
If you are local to Shawbury there are some good cross country/fell races around - google Mercia Fell Runners for a decent list of available races.

The Brown Clee Burn is coming up soon - and they give you a sausage bap and a brew after you’ve finished!

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@schweik I did the Wrekin fell race a few years ago and do not have the confidence to run balls out downhill, plus for some reason I was not very fast going up the hill either. I think I'd need to get some more training in before I went for a full on fell race again.

I did enjoy the Milford 21 race when I was training for the London marathon. That was on Cannock Chase with about 4000' of accent in 21 miles. The Mrs did it as well and still has nightmares about it when she has to go to the area with her job. I think it was the hill at the end when she was knackered that got her. As well as the memory of doing the same thing about 20.5 miles previously at the start of the race.

Rp.
 
I have run the Wrekin Fell Race a few times - one year there was a group of lads there from RAF Cosford running in memory of a mate who had died. I was overtaken by one of them who was wearing a suit and a Boris Johnson mask, and if that wasn’t bad enough I narrowly avoided being overtaken by another who was dressed in a giant hotdog outfit!
 
My missis has been dragging me around the Black Mountains fell race for training, on a fairly regular basis this year; it's a really tough 17 mile route (though my garmin always says 18 miles).

She's running the actual race in a few weeks (I'm undecided 'cos last year it near killed me and I finished bleeding), but she is also ultra marathon training, so after work tomorrow, we're departing with rucksacks and we plan to hike the route twice, through the night and well into Saturday.

Purposely after work, so we're starting already tired (she wants to practise some sleep deprivation).

I'm not sure how I'm going to get on to be honest and I'm thinking of having an affair with her fat sister who just watches a lot of TV.
 
Shawbury 10 completed today. Nice enough race but today was not PB potential for anyone as there was a strong wind blowing in your face as you ran along the length of the runway. Still, I completed it in under 50 mins and felt OK whilst running, but the garmin shows a max heart rate of 197bpm on one screen and 184 on another. Scarey stuff.

The Mrs says I looked really slow when I crossed the line, mile 6 was 7.06 min mile and the last 0.2 mile was at 6.25 min mile pace. There's no pleasing some people.

The winners came in at around the 35 minute mark, so were really shifting.
 

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