Running?

#81
Good luck with the ballot.

I volunteered at Paris a couple of weeks ago, in a heatwave. Ran Paris in 2017, in a heatwave. Volunteered at a water station in 2016, in a heatwave. Last road marathon was in October 2017, in a heatwave. First ever marathon in 2007 it went up to 33°c. It made a nice change doing my December marathon when it was minus 12°c. I'm Scottish and don't like the heat !!!
Wow I'm deeply impressed, with everyone on the site. Inspirational stuff.
Once you've run one marathon does the next feel easier, or do you have to train just as hard? Does it help running with lots of people? People say it helps but I fear it will just psych me out. When I run with my kids they always want to go faster and I panic.
Fell running is really appealing for the solitude, but a hill at the start.........would kill me. I can just about cope 'running' up hill half way through a long run. Still, to begin with I couldn't even manage that, so baby steps make progress. More hill training I guess.
 
#82
nearly 55 years old nacker, 4 times a week 15k along north downs way, I enjoy running more now than back in the day..
Had a place for VLM this Sunday but I've deferred as I've been on the injury bench since late January, so I'm volunteering instead.

It's a bugger getting old. However at 59 I'm still more active than many.
Just pinged 60. I have noticed that I look forward more to exercise nowadays compared to when I was younger.

Until the discs get replaced I am having to ride the bike so I spend around an hour and a half to two hours five days a week on that. Not the same as running or yomping, but it causes no impact so it does not aggravate the spine.
 
#84
Anyone here got any experience of fartlek training? As in, does it work and so on? I can't keep using pain as an excuse to be a fatty, though the amount I'm in on a daily basis is a rather good one, and fartlek's always struck me as a good starting point for more than just walking everywhere.
 
#85
Anyone here got any experience of fartlek training? As in, does it work and so on? I can't keep using pain as an excuse to be a fatty, though the amount I'm in on a daily basis is a rather good one, and fartlek's always struck me as a good starting point for more than just walking everywhere.
I'm inferring you want to lose weight and that's your main training aim?

That's mostly achieved by diet, tbh. I know loads of overweight runners right up to ultra marathon level which proves the 'you can't outrun a bad diet' cliche.

And fartlek is speedplay, if you're not running at the moment, I wouldn't suggest you do speed play; you'll possibly get an injury.

Boring as this may sound, the most effective way that I know of, of losing weight quickly is by eating a low carb high fat diet, and if you combine that with low heart rate training (easy pace running), you're onto a winner.
 
#86
Going hashing on Sunday; that counts as running right?
I've heard of hash house harrier clubs which seems to involve running and drinking.

Is that what you mean?

It's not for me though; I'm one of those dodgy sober alkies; though the idea of a few pints after a run does sound appealing.

But I've never had just a 'few pints' in my life.

I'm all or nowt.
 
#87
Wow I'm deeply impressed, with everyone on the site. Inspirational stuff.
Once you've run one marathon does the next feel easier, or do you have to train just as hard? Does it help running with lots of people? People say it helps but I fear it will just psych me out. When I run with my kids they always want to go faster and I panic.
Fell running is really appealing for the solitude, but a hill at the start.........would kill me. I can just about cope 'running' up hill half way through a long run. Still, to begin with I couldn't even manage that, so baby steps make progress. More hill training I guess.
Fell running:
Read “Feet in the Clouds” by Richard Askwith. It’s brilliant and inspirational. It got me into fell running in my mid-50s
I’m never going to win any races, but I do OK. I’m also hugely impressed by the numbers of older runners involved - many of them much older than me.
 
#88
Fell running:
Read “Feet in the Clouds” by Richard Askwith. It’s brilliant and inspirational. It got me into fell running in my mid-50s
I’m never going to win any races, but I do OK. I’m also hugely impressed by the numbers of older runners involved - many of them much older than me.
I like that book too. There's a couple of Bob Graham finishers in my running club.

I love the Black Mountains fell race. I've reccy'd and ran it a few times. It's 18 miles and tougher than any road marathon; it's a real slog.

It's possibly tougher than an ultra marathon (I ran the Brecon Beacons ultra - 46 miles and don't think I suffered as much on that as I do on the Black Mountains fell race).

On the last one there were a couple of guys in the 70+ age category, which was amazing.

Which part of the country do you run in?
 
#93
I've heard of hash house harrier clubs which seems to involve running and drinking.

Is that what you mean?

It's not for me though; I'm one of those dodgy sober alkies; though the idea of a few pints after a run does sound appealing.

But I've never had just a 'few pints' in my life.

I'm all or nowt.
Nothing dodgy about being a sober alchie mate. In my experience they are the best type of alchies- for all concerned.
 
#94
My most local hill is The Wrekin. There are at least three fell races over it each year (Wrekin Fell Race, Wrekin Streak, Wrekin Wrecker). Then there are numerous others - Long Mynd, Stiperstones, Caer Caradoc, Pontesbury Hill, and in Wales places like the Breidden Hills.

Probably others I may have done and forgotten, or that are run which I have not done. I'm a bit north of you -but last year I ran the Brown Clee Burn which is a pleasant 7 miler, with a free cup of tea and sausage sandwich at the end for all competitors. I go running on Brown Clee sometimes at weekends, and swim in Boyne water (a man made small lake half way up Brown Clee)
 
#95
Its fairly niche, but I have ben amazed since taking it up as to how many events there are all over the country. It has been a real eye opener for me.
If you don't mind a bit of travel there's the Brecon fell racing weekend:

Home - Brecon Fans Races

It's like 12 quid for two races, and camping is a fiver in a farmer's field near the foot of Pen Y Fan.

We've done this a few times now; it's becoming part of our regular racing calendar.
 
#97
When I go running now I get a really sore heel that is painful to walk on for a few days after. Weird thing is it only happens on the 1 leg. I'm sure it's cos I don't stretch before or after because when I get up in the morning, if I stretch that leg it feels much much better.
 
#98
When I go running now I get a really sore heel that is painful to walk on for a few days after. Weird thing is it only happens on the 1 leg. I'm sure it's cos I don't stretch before or after because when I get up in the morning, if I stretch that leg it feels much much better.
You could be served well with a self-referral to your local health authority physiotherapy department, and get your legs checked out. There may be some underlying problems there, which over-training could exacerbate. It sounds to me like you've got a dodgy Achilles tendon issue, as they can manifest as heel pain, but a physio should be able to confirm or deny that for you.
 
#99
When I go running now I get a really sore heel that is painful to walk on for a few days after. Weird thing is it only happens on the 1 leg. I'm sure it's cos I don't stretch before or after because when I get up in the morning, if I stretch that leg it feels much much better.
That sounds like Plantar Faciitis; a very common running injury.

Plantar fasciitis: Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

I've have it on a reoccurring basis and I've tried all kinds of stuff to try and rid myself of it including:

Lots of calf stretches, holding them for two-minutes at a time (tight calves are often thought to be the problem).
Rolling my foot on a hard ball (like a golf ball).
Self massage of the calf using rollers.
Freezing a bottle of water and rolling my foot over it.
Ibruprofen (which helps, but I don't like taking)

But I also eat a low carb high fat diet, but sometimes I relapse and hit the chocolate hard, and when this happens, I've noticed that my heel is really sore the next day, and for a few days following. And when I'm back on low carb, it gets much better to the point it feels recovered.

Apparently sugar is an inflammatory and there's google evidence that sugar is the cause too.

But this is one of those injuries where if you ask several different experts on what causes it, and what the solution is, you'll get several different answers.
 
I'll try the stretching and holding it for longer, rather than the token 6 secs that I cuff off with.

Flexibility is something that is underrated I think. I think it becomes more important the older you get. I've never given it much attention but it's only when you see someone who can do all sorts of stretches that you realise just how inflexible you really are.
 

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