Running?

#41
........................

Anyone do any running this weekend?
Wish I could. I have two squished disc's C6/C7 and L5/S1 .... impact from running aggravated the already damaged L5/S1 - no more impact exercise allowed. Seen a Doc in Germany to get an overhaul and get the disc's replaced (ADR) - C6/C7 should be getting done in September with the lower to follow in early 2019.

On a positive note; my mountain bike gets thrashed for 25 miles everyday up and down the Cotton Trail on the edge of Fort Worth.
 
#42
Get off the interweb and go for a run.

Just joking.

That sounds tough.
It's a work, work, culture in the US. The husbands go out and kill themselves to put bread on the table and the Yummies go out jogging, to the gym and power walking to keep in trim so that they can quickly land a new husband when the present one die's.
 
#43
It's a work, work, culture in the US. The husbands go out and kill themselves to put bread on the table and the Yummies go out jogging, to the gym and power walking to keep in trim so that they can quickly land a new husband when the present one die's.
Worthy of an informative, funny and a like.
 
#44
Without knowing your age, training age, and general running capabilities, it could be that five days isn't enough time for you to recover from running 17 km.

Is this your longest run? Did you run it hard?

As for 'getting better every time', it takes about three weeks for you to benefit from any training run, which is why most marathon training programs peak 3 weeks prior to the marathon with the last long run taking place then, and the following three weeks is just a taper, (with a little bit of speedwork near the end to maintain blood volume).

Also don't try to get quicker, week in, week out, on your training runs; you'll just get injured. The majority of your miles should be at an easy pace.
I'm 62, ex RAF, female, so not a great background of fitness, but always done a bit. Started running 3 times a week just for enjoyment about six months ago, partly to lower my blood pressure. Use the Nike run app which is great and gives me a plan with some tempo runs, speed runs and long runs. 19.6 km was my longest about 2 and a half weeks ago ( 2 hours 20) but after then I was on holiday and just did short runs , so 17 km last week felt tough. Actually everything over about 12 km is a struggle! If I took my age from 180 I'm not sure I could run at all! Fastest 10 km is 62 mins. Fastest 5 km is 29 mins, fastest mile 8 mins. I usually do some kind of activity everyday for 45 to 90 mins, weights, running, swimming. So yea even my best effort running would be considered an easy pace for most people.
Really appreciate the advice! Thank you. So maybe not do anything in the last week before the race?
 
#45
I'm 62, ex RAF, female, so not a great background of fitness, but always done a bit. Started running 3 times a week just for enjoyment about six months ago, partly to lower my blood pressure. Use the Nike run app which is great and gives me a plan with some tempo runs, speed runs and long runs. 19.6 km was my longest about 2 and a half weeks ago ( 2 hours 20) but after then I was on holiday and just did short runs , so 17 km last week felt tough. Actually everything over about 12 km is a struggle! If I took my age from 180 I'm not sure I could run at all! Fastest 10 km is 62 mins. Fastest 5 km is 29 mins, fastest mile 8 mins. I usually do some kind of activity everyday for 45 to 90 mins, weights, running, swimming. So yea even my best effort running would be considered an easy pace for most people.
Really appreciate the advice! Thank you. So maybe not do anything in the last week before the race?
My 180 minus your age is a simplification of the full formula, which I think does change if you're over 60. I think you get to add five beats, so 180 - your age + 5. I think other's suggest a +10 addition, but I'd play it safe and just do the +5.

And when I first started doing this method, I had to walk lots - including every single incline, but as time passes and your aerobic engine increases, you will walk less and run faster, yet not working harder. A fast 5k is still ran at something like 75% aerobic fitness, so this is where you get the most bang for your buck.

I'm no expert, but I know a bit, and based on the knowledge I have, I'd suggest you do two short runs and one long one, per week, all done at a very easy pace. And after a month, add another short run in.

Keep the short runs at a minimum of 30 minutes and the long run should be around 20 to 30 percent of your overall weekly mileage. Jog and walk this one; keep it really easy.

If you find every week is too frequent for the long run, do it every 10 days instead.

Based on what you've said, I'd say when you struggled to get past 11 km, it was due to lack of recovery after your 17 km run. The heat will have played a part too.

As for your race, yes, keep running, but really get the mileage right down and run it all easy; run just 1 mile the day prior. A few days before, you could do a LITTLE speedwork, say 10 second sprints x 5; this will help maintain your blood volume (more blood volume will help on your race), or a short tempo run (start slow and build to a 10k tempo pace for a few minutes then taper back down), but only if you've done some speed in training. It's not worth risking an injury.

And as a general rule for racing, it's better to be under trained on the start line than over trained. So err on the side of caution.
 
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#47
I'm 62, ex RAF, female, so not a great background of fitness, but always done a bit. Started running 3 times a week just for enjoyment about six months ago, partly to lower my blood pressure. Use the Nike run app which is great and gives me a plan with some tempo runs, speed runs and long runs. 19.6 km was my longest about 2 and a half weeks ago ( 2 hours 20) but after then I was on holiday and just did short runs , so 17 km last week felt tough. Actually everything over about 12 km is a struggle! If I took my age from 180 I'm not sure I could run at all! Fastest 10 km is 62 mins. Fastest 5 km is 29 mins, fastest mile 8 mins. I usually do some kind of activity everyday for 45 to 90 mins, weights, running, swimming. So yea even my best effort running would be considered an easy pace for most people.
Really appreciate the advice! Thank you. So maybe not do anything in the last week before the race?
Beetroot juice is natures blood pressure reducer.

I have a measured cup full every morning mixed with a cup of nicer tasting berry juice. Beetroot juice tastes like concentrate horse pee on it's own so the berry juice makes it palatable. My old Doc reckoned it can reduce your BP by 5 - 10 points.
 
#48
Worthy of an informative, funny and a like.
You must see them bouncing and wiggling up and down all the time at your place. You can't move without tripping over them here, they boot the old man out of the door, shuffle the kids off to school then out they go in their lycra ........s'lovely;).
 
#49
About to turn 41 and run 4 (sometimes 5) days a week during my lunchbreak (three young kids make it hard to get time).

Generally its barefoot sand runs and only 5km each one, but I really feel better for it.If I do 5 km alongside the sand its a 18-19 min run and 23-27 if on the sand.

I have friends that run half marathons and it amazes me how they still have jobs/families etc.
It's an odd one, but if you're running barefoot on sand, do you "stretch your toes"?

A long, long time ago now, I used to "reach out" with my toes, when barefoot (think spreading your fingers, but with your feet), and not only do you freak out everyone you know, when on Brighton beach, but it makes traveling on sand easier.
 
#50
I'm 62, ex RAF, female, so not a great background of fitness, but always done a bit. Started running 3 times a week just for enjoyment about six months ago, partly to lower my blood pressure. Use the Nike run app which is great and gives me a plan with some tempo runs, speed runs and long runs. 19.6 km was my longest about 2 and a half weeks ago ( 2 hours 20) but after then I was on holiday and just did short runs , so 17 km last week felt tough. Actually everything over about 12 km is a struggle! If I took my age from 180 I'm not sure I could run at all! Fastest 10 km is 62 mins. Fastest 5 km is 29 mins, fastest mile 8 mins. I usually do some kind of activity everyday for 45 to 90 mins, weights, running, swimming. So yea even my best effort running would be considered an easy pace for most people.
Really appreciate the advice! Thank you. So maybe not do anything in the last week before the race?
Work on your flexibility. It might not be as 'sexy' as endurance or speed, but it gets you doing something every day and keeps you focused on your target.
 
#51
Just for interest, I believe that in long ultra marathons, the gender and age differences narrow, and it's not that unusual to find females in their sixties smashing ultra marathons in the 50 to 100 mile region.

So if you want to get competitive...
Speaking from a point of ingorance, but I thought women did better at ultras as they get older, so they overtake men on the real long-distance stuff over about 50.
 
#52
Beetroot juice is natures blood pressure reducer.

I have a measured cup full every morning mixed with a cup of nicer tasting berry juice. Beetroot juice tastes like concentrate horse pee on it's own so the berry juice makes it palatable. My old Doc reckoned it can reduce your BP by 5 - 10 points.
Could have a solution for you there. I went to the London coffee festival, and someone there is releasing a beetroot latte into the wild soon. It's a disturbing colour (pink), but delicious.
 
#53
Work on your flexibility. It might not be as 'sexy' as endurance or speed, but it gets you doing something every day and keeps you focused on your target.
Flexibility is not a problem for me. I've always done a bit of yoga which is good for breathing control too. I can't imagine ever finding endurance running 'sexy', but i love the thought that I might be able to tackle an ultra marathon one day . What a goal that would be for when I eventually retire. I'll get the half marathons out of the way first.........signed up for another in October, maybe a full marathon next year? Hard to imagine ever being able to double the distance, but I know people much older than me cruise through them. Thanks for all the advice, it's great motivation.
 
#54
It's an odd one, but if you're running barefoot on sand, do you "stretch your toes"?

A long, long time ago now, I used to "reach out" with my toes, when barefoot (think spreading your fingers, but with your feet), and not only do you freak out everyone you know, when on Brighton beach, but it makes traveling on sand easier.
I can’t say I do.. it’s obviously harder than running with trainers on terra firmer, but I don’t think my toes are manipulative enough to stretch out. It’s a good work out on the calves though when the sand is soft.
 
#56
@Whey_Aye_Banzai great thread mate, some really interesting ideas.
I stopped running a couple of years ago when my knees never seemed to stop aching. I was my own worst enemy as I always wanted to do a better time than the last run- which is obviously impossible. I tried to do the restricted heart rate technique but, like you, found I needed to walk to keep it low enough. I thought it was a waste of running time and sacked it off- should have persevered!

Now I’m just tabbing- not carrying much weight, probably 25-30Ib max, but I’d love to get running, or even jogging, again. I’d just hate to knacker my joints completely.
 
#59
Beetroot juice is natures blood pressure reducer.

I have a measured cup full every morning mixed with a cup of nicer tasting berry juice. Beetroot juice tastes like concentrate horse pee on it's own so the berry juice makes it palatable. My old Doc reckoned it can reduce your BP by 5 - 10 points.
@guzzijon & @9370 from your informatives re. the above post should may also want to consider making the other part of the beetroot cocktail using pomegranate juice, or better yet drink a glass of pomegranate juice during the day too.

Pomegranate juice has the same effect as beetroot juice in helping reduce BP over time. The effects of both have been checked scientifically so it is a fact............just that if drug companies tell you about it they will not sell those nice expensive tablets.

What You Should Know About Pomegranates and Blood Pressure

Pomegranate: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, and Warning

Beetroot juice and blood pressure: Study and benefits

Beetroot 'can lower blood pressure'
 
#60
Flexibility is not a problem for me. I've always done a bit of yoga which is good for breathing control too. I can't imagine ever finding endurance running 'sexy', but i love the thought that I might be able to tackle an ultra marathon one day . What a goal that would be for when I eventually retire. I'll get the half marathons out of the way first.........signed up for another in October, maybe a full marathon next year? Hard to imagine ever being able to double the distance, but I know people much older than me cruise through them. Thanks for all the advice, it's great motivation.
There is a yoga studio near me, I keep meaning to go, one of the local lycra ladies recommended it to me. She told me that it is very well regarded and that many of the players from the Dallas Cowboys American footie team go there for a beasting a couple or three times a week. The yoga is done in a warm environment and is some sort of extreme yoga, apparently the footie blokes say that an hour of that is more intense than an hour of physical beasting by the trainer.
 

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