Running?

#21
My daft brother has signed himself up for this: MT Snowdon Ultra 100 and this: SBU St Begas Ultra and no doubt some other craziness, so he's out running as often as possible (which he does anyway). I'll no doubt let you all know if he's going to try to raise some more dosh for the RNLI.

This is his shoe.

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Well. One of them. He dragged me out to this place in Stokesley the other week Lets Run Stokesley – LETS RUN because one of his running chums owns it. He spent over an hour in there - I kid you not - worse than a woman in Debenhams trying on frocks. Just a little shop, but the bloke knows his stuff if anyone is after some decent jogging pumps.
 
#22
I had a BUPA MoT, and was told that my lung capacity was 50% bigger that normal, So, the years of running, skiing, climbing and white water canoeing in the mob, paid off, and at nearly 70, I am still fitter than most of my fellow old farts.
We've recently had a 71 year old lass join the running club after completing a couch to 5k course. She's loving it.

And I - briefly - ran behind a 60 something fell runner, and she had a gorgeous arse and pair of legs on her. Honest.
I say all that to tempt you back into running shoes. :-D
 
#23
My daft brother has signed himself up for this: MT Snowdon Ultra 100 and this: SBU St Begas Ultra and no doubt some other craziness, so he's out running as often as possible (which he does anyway).
I live with an ultra runner who is fairly extreme; she's ran and won a 100 miler (first female 10th overall). She helped me around the Brecon Beacon Ultra in November; 46 miles of misery, and the training wasn't much fun either.

She's gearing up to run the Offa's Dyke; 185 miles from South Wales coast to the North Wales coast next year, ran over 3 days, day and night (sleeping where you can) so has planned a series of ultra marathons to build her up to running it.

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Running is her 'life'.

The saddo.
 
#25
Anyway I hate running - I always did.
Same here(ish).

But I really enjoyed tearing down the Sugarloaf on Saturday; I felt like a kid again:


No work problems, in fact there's no thinking about anything other than trying not breaking your neck and attempting to beat the next bloke or lass in front of you.

Freeeeeedoooooom 'n' all that.
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
#26
Same here(ish).

But I really enjoyed tearing down the Sugarloaf on Saturday; I felt like a kid again:


No work problems, in fact there's no thinking about anything other than trying not breaking your neck and attempting to beat the next bloke or lass in front of you.

Freeeeeedoooooom 'n' all that.
My knees would have given out after 100m and I'd have been flossing Monmouthshires finest dirt out of my teeth for a week..... If it is was damp my zimmer frame feet would have dug in and I'd have been doing flick flacks and triple salcos until I reached Abergavenny....=-|
 
#28
We do the low carb high fat diet; it's great for endurance runners, and great for weight loss too. However, being on a taper for a marathon in two weeks, and surrounded by cakes at the weekend, I relapsed and hit them hard.

I also troughed a big box of chocolates I was given as a present for helping out at a running race.

Consequently I woke up with a really sore foot - plantar faciitis - which ended up with me hobbling around for most of the day. It's a recurring issue I've had for a few years now.

And it happens every time I have a sugar binge.

24 hours of low carbing it later, it's 90% better.

Weird, isn't it?
 
#29
@Whey_Aye_Banzai _ I'm doing the keto diet thingy to try and shift some pounds. Being mostly desk bound and not 21 any more, I'm nudging 210 lbs these days and being 5' 7" I want to get to 200 or under. I'm also doing a 15 week build up to a half marathon (not for an event, more a "never done one and it might be fun") kind of thing.
Trouble is, the other w/e I was meant to do 10 mile and hit a wall at 8; nothing in the tank. Seeing your posts I wondered if you've got any thoughts how I can combine the two - priority #1 is weight loss, but I'd also want to be able to do the 13 miles.
Grateful for any input.
 
#30
I did 17 km 5 days ago, then today I found it really hard to get beyond 11 km and wondered if it was because it was about 25 degrees, first time for me in the heat. But the advice here was to run/ walk, which is what I did and I guess that is always an option. It definitely helps. But it's really disheartening when you think you are going to get better every time. Also wondered how much to rest before the day, 7th May. ? I think I'm in danger of psyching myself out. Also read a really discouraging blog about the race showing endless tracks alongside a dual carriageway. It looked dire! Hope I can finish it and keep running....
 
#32
@Whey_Aye_Banzai _ I'm doing the keto diet thingy to try and shift some pounds. Being mostly desk bound and not 21 any more, I'm nudging 210 lbs these days and being 5' 7" I want to get to 200 or under. I'm also doing a 15 week build up to a half marathon (not for an event, more a "never done one and it might be fun") kind of thing.
Trouble is, the other w/e I was meant to do 10 mile and hit a wall at 8; nothing in the tank. Seeing your posts I wondered if you've got any thoughts how I can combine the two - priority #1 is weight loss, but I'd also want to be able to do the 13 miles.
Grateful for any input.
Keto (I prefer low carb), works hand-in-hand with low heart rate training. Get a heart rate monitor (doesn't have to be an expensive one, but get one with a chest strap because the tech's not there yet with the wrist only devices) and subtract your age from 180.

When you run - DO NOT GO OVER THAT NUMBER.

Don't do any speed work for three months.

Build volume by time. At first you'll probably have to run and walk, especially on hills, to stay under your number, so hang your ego by the coats as you head out the door, but as the weeks pass you'll get faster and faster, yet never going over that heart rate (180 minus your age). My aerobic pace is about 8.5 mmp, but elite athletes could be 6 mmp. You might find yours is about 12 or 13 mmp to begin with. Most people find it frustrating when they start, but stick with it.

What you're doing is building an aerobic fitness base; this is the foundation of all endurance sports. It will also increase your fat burning capability, in that your body will become 'fat adapted' to utilise fat as fuel a lot easier than what you're currently finding, which is probably why you bonked at 8 miles; you've went low carb, you have depleted glycogen stores (which is good), but unfortunately your body hasn't yet adapted to using fat, including your body fat, as fuel.

After three months you can add a little speed, but to be honest, the fastest I've been was during a period of training where I did nothing but long slow runs - big volume - while training for an ultra marathon. I got hacked off with running slow, so did a 5k race, and amazingly found myself at the front of the race (I'm normally mid pack) and I came in fourth.

I've not listened to it all, but this guy is explaining the process fairly well (from the bit I heard):


It's a heart healthy way to train and will reduce your risk of injury also. Even my other half (quite a decent ultra runner) plans to do a two-or-three month period of low heart rate training after our end of the month marathon since she's been racing too much. Me too.

It works and it's a lot more pleasant than flogging the guts out of yourself all the time.
 
#34
I did 17 km 5 days ago, then today I found it really hard to get beyond 11 km and wondered if it was because it was about 25 degrees, first time for me in the heat. But the advice here was to run/ walk, which is what I did and I guess that is always an option. It definitely helps. But it's really disheartening when you think you are going to get better every time. Also wondered how much to rest before the day, 7th May. ? I think I'm in danger of psyching myself out. Also read a really discouraging blog about the race showing endless tracks alongside a dual carriageway. It looked dire! Hope I can finish it and keep running....
Without knowing your age, training age, and general running capabilities, it could be that five days isn't enough time for you to recover from running 17 km.

Is this your longest run? Did you run it hard?

As for 'getting better every time', it takes about three weeks for you to benefit from any training run, which is why most marathon training programs peak 3 weeks prior to the marathon with the last long run taking place then, and the following three weeks is just a taper, (with a little bit of speedwork near the end to maintain blood volume).

Also don't try to get quicker, week in, week out, on your training runs; you'll just get injured. The majority of your miles should be at an easy pace.
 
#35
About to turn 41 and run 4 (sometimes 5) days a week during my lunchbreak (three young kids make it hard to get time).

Generally its barefoot sand runs and only 5km each one, but I really feel better for it.If I do 5 km alongside the sand its a 18-19 min run and 23-27 if on the sand.

I have friends that run half marathons and it amazes me how they still have jobs/families etc.
 
#37
I'd say that if you haven't time to be able to train for a half marathon, which to be fair wouldn't take up a lot of time, then you ought to take a look at your life. Something's out of balance.
I have three kids 5 and under and work around 55 hrs a week - Is it out of balance, maybe... but its the U.S and things are different here. I should get more time as they get older, but running for best part of 2 hours/ a few times a week at least and not during work time is tough.
 
#39
I have three kids 5 and under and work around 55 hrs a week - Is it out of balance, maybe... but its the U.S and things are different here. I should get more time as they get older, but running for best part of 2 hours/ a few times a week at least and not during work time is tough.
Get off the interweb and go for a run.

Just joking.

That sounds tough.
 
#40

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