Running?

#1
Wor Lass and myself did the Sugarloaf Mountain fell race on Saturday; a medium distance fell race at 7 miles, but there was a lot more uphill than down. And I beat Wor Lass, which is unusual, but she's lots of reasons for why this happened.

We also did our last long run today, prior to Newport Marathon at the end of the month.

Anyone do any running this weekend?
 
#2
No, but did do a 20mile tab carrying 45lbs today.
 
#4
Wor Lass and myself did the Sugarloaf Mountain fell race on Saturday; a medium distance fell race at 7 miles, but there was a lot more uphill than down. And I beat Wor Lass, which is unusual, but she's lots of reasons for why this happened.

We also did our last long run today, prior to Newport Marathon at the end of the month.

Anyone do any running this weekend?
In America right now, on the way back from the White mountains New Haven. Did a trail run yesterday in the snow, about 4 miles, sliding about. Got my first ever half marathon coming up on May 7 and a bit worried as I haven't run further than 5 miles at a time for the last 2 weeks. Get back to training next week and hopefully be ok.
 
#5
I haven't run further than 5 miles at a time for the last 2 weeks. Get back to training next week and hopefully be ok.
You should be okay, with a little over four weeks to go. Try to do a long run of about 7 miles this week and 9 or 10 the week after. Then taper. Make sure you do these runs really slowly; walk and run if you need to. I don't understand the physiology, but long slow runs are to increase your mitochondria (or something) and these increase whether you thrash yourself or not. My understanding is that running fast or hard on a long slow run is pointless and just increases your risk of injury and prolongs your recovery.

That should get you there; just start the half slowly and get slower if you have to.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
Did a half marathon yesterday. Hurting now, stairs are not my friend! My training was thrown off about a month or so ago when i got a nasty bug that knocked me out for three weeks!
 
#8
#9
You should be okay, with a little over four weeks to go. Try to do a long run of about 7 miles this week and 9 or 10 the week after. Then taper. Make sure you do these runs really slowly; walk and run if you need to. I don't understand the physiology, but long slow runs are to increase your mitochondria (or something) and these increase whether you thrash yourself or not. My understanding is that running fast or hard on a long slow run is pointless and just increases your risk of injury and prolongs your recovery.

That should get you there; just start the half slowly and get slower if you have to.
Thanks for the advice. Very reassuring! Do you think for a half marathon it's necessary to eat anything on the way? People talk about taking in sugars of some kind. I've never done that and was up to 19 km few weeks ago, but was pretty dead on my feet by the end. I know for the race there will be water available on the way without having to carry it which is a bonus.
 
#11
Had a dodgy curry on Friday,....can you see where this is going,......... on Sunday morning at dark O'clock, a mad dash to the crapper diverted what could have been a very smelly and disastrous situation. The fastest bog dash this side of the Cairo two step. Had to run for the bus last week. The last RUN I done was in the mob, back in 76 with SGT G**** H***** at 1st Armd in Verden. End.
You utter cock
 
#12
Thanks for the advice. Very reassuring! Do you think for a half marathon it's necessary to eat anything on the way? People talk about taking in sugars of some kind. I've never done that and was up to 19 km few weeks ago, but was pretty dead on my feet by the end. I know for the race there will be water available on the way without having to carry it which is a bonus.
I think that's a 'it depends' answer.

For you, I'd probably say 'yes'. Eat what you normally would for breakfast (a couple of slices of toast maybe) before a long run (nothing new; you don't want dodgy guts) and take a couple of gels or a handful of jelly babies.

Practise this on your next long run, just to make sure nothing disagrees with you.

You don't want to crap yourself at mile 10 on race day.

But if you plan to carry on with endurance type running, take a look at low carb diet for endurance athletes; it's about training your body to be better at utilising fat (including body fat) for fuel. We've been doing this for over a year now (mostly and definitely not perfectly) and we like the results.
 
#13
Running?

That's the thing that youngsters do?
Running clubs are full of middle-aged and older types. Youngsters stay at home staring at screens these days. I read some stat recently which reckoned the 5 most unfit kids from a school class 20 years ago would now rate as the top five fittest.

Our oldest running club member is in his 80s now and he still pushes out a slow marathon in about 6 hours. We've lots and lots of retired types. The club is trying to attract some younger folk, but not having much success.
 
#14
Aye. Double the distance. Not sure these old legs will manage it thou :)
If you've done half the distance carrying the weight required, I'm sure you will. A bit more training to get you to 70% of the distance and a good two-week TAPER, and you'll be good to go.

Make sure you still do some training during the taper to keep you sharp and your blood volume high (high intensity short duration is good for this, but if you've not done that during training, don't do it in the taper).

And with a good fueling strategy on the day, which you practice on your current long tabs, and you'll be reet.
 
#15
Running clubs are full of middle-aged and older types. Youngsters stay at home staring at screens these days. I read some stat recently which reckoned the 5 most unfit kids from a school class 20 years ago would now rate as the top five fittest.

Our oldest running club member is in his 80s now and he still pushes out a slow marathon in about 6 hours. We've lots and lots of retired types. The club is trying to attract some younger folk, but not having much success.
I could maybe push out a marathon in 6 days
 
#16
Further to my post 11, ( Mr Harry Skinters notwithstanding) During my time in uniform I enjoyed the PE side of army life, being a fit and healthy young man, running, for pleasure and sport was enjoyable, and the cross country competitions were looked forward to with relish. On discharge I carried on in what little spare time I had. Now, today, some 40 years later its as much as I can do to run for the bus. On the up side of running, a few years ago, before I retired, I had a BUPA MoT, and was told that my lung capacity was 50% bigger that normal, So, the years of running, skiing, climbing and white water canoeing in the mob, paid off, and at nearly 70, I am still fitter than most of my fellow old farts.
Cheers for that.
So no you don't run.
Crayoning lantern swinger
 

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