Running the Bulls in Pamplona

Discussion in 'The Intelligence Cell' started by box-of-frogs, Jul 7, 2010.

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  1. I haven't but someone from work has. Yes he was injured, but not by any bull. He wasn't looking where he was running and ran into a wall.

    Silly bastard.
  2. Great sport - but don't underestimate the dangers - especially after a skinful the night before. I was in Pamplona briefly during "Sanfermines" in I think 2003 and gave it some serious thought. But I had a badly sprained ankle at the time (tripping over a kerb while running at Shrivenham...) and decided that discretion was the better part of valour. Still not sure whether that was a sensible and grown-up decision - or an opportunity missed...

    One year I will do it - but probably at one of the more low-key festivals elsewhere in Navarra where there might be a few less hungover Australians et al.
  3. I would watch the bullrun with more interest if the bulls had some way of fitting ak47s to themselves and shooting the buggers who are trying to prove their macho status by harassing them. Or if someone managed to create a minotaur to do the job properly.

  4. Sappers often enter a team.Not sure if they are doing it this year,due to ''other commitments'
  5. Lucky they don't play conkers! That would be banned as too dangerous!
  6. Did the run three days of the seven back in the 80s.
    Have an image somewhere with my hand fending off a bull's horn on the run somewhere.
    It has changed considerably since Hemingway's day when the run began down the steep hill
    out of town. If memory serves me right the route it's now only about one & a half clicks.
    Before the run the Garda Civil clear the route of drunken antipodeans who are still in the gutter,
    and any lasses caught trying to have a go are ejected.
    The little known secret is that among the bulls are cows, who keep the herd moving swiftly forward.
    It is customary to run in white with a red sash or a scarf and a rolled
    up newspaper to distract the bull if you have caught it's attention.
    Along the route there are natural choke points that can prove problematic,
    especially with the slippery cobbled stones - but these may have gone by now.
    I also understand that they may now be limiting the numbers of those who run.
    When you finally get into the arena of the bull ring, the opposite gates are left open
    which the cows head for, taking some of the bulls with them.
    Here the afficienados try and make sport with the bulls, as far as their machismo allows.
    When the bulls have finally exited the ring they let in younger ones, who have their horns sheathed in taped cardboard.
    And those of an agile & courageous disposition can have some really fun sport.
    I can't recommend going highly enough - though finding accomodation is a real pain
    and even when the run starts at 0700 its bl**dy hot and a bind if you've been up all night and haven't rehydrated.
    In the afternoon are the bull fights and the nights are for serious seshing.
    There is a small square with a fountain from which bar diving into the crowd is enthusiastically encouraged.
    Though it's not a good idea to climb up and slag off aussies and then make the plunge, as I witnessed, when an
    eytie gobshite who came to a very sticky terminal end having seriously misjudged antipodean humour.
    Otherwise a cracking time was had by all. Go if you can but try & sort out digs before hand.