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Running in my 50s (and running out of steam!)

Carbs convert to sugar (energy) protein goes to your muscles (if taken at the tight time).

Carbs before long runs, protein immediately after hard exercise of any length. There'll be others who can be more scientific than me
Wot 'e said.
 
Nutritional considerations for the older athlete

In this review article, nutritional considerations of the aging athlete are discussed. The focuses of the review include energy, carbohydrate, protein, selected vitamins and minerals, and fluids. Age-associated changes in body composition, resting energy expenditure, and volume and intensity of training, may decrease the need for dietary energy and the intakes of macro- and micronutrients and fluids. The older athlete should monitor nutrient intakes to insure adequacy, especially regarding carbohydrate to promote glucose storage and use as an energy source during exercise, and protein to promote strength-training-induced muscle hypertrophy. Emphasis should also be placed on the dietary intakes of certain micronutrients, as well as the potential need for supplementation of certain vitamins and minerals, including the vitamins B2, B6, B12, D, E, and folate, and the minerals calcium and iron. Age-associated changes in thermoregulation and an increased susceptibility to dehydration underscore the critical importance to the older athlete of adequate fluid intake to sustain health and performance. Nutrition is a tool that the older athlete should use to enhance exercise performance and health.

 
Nutrition of the older athlete

Nutritional needs and dietary goals of the older athlete involve meeting basic physiologic requirements of aging and exercise, promoting weight control, and incorporating guidelines for reducing the risk of chronic disease. Conservative dietary approaches to weight loss in the obese patient and a high-carbohydrate diet for maximum exercise performance are sound approaches, although diets often need to be individualized. Recent dietary recommendations to reduce fat and increase fiber can be applied without risk of compromising nutritional status for most patients. Guidance away from extremes in caloric restriction and in the distribution of calories may help to promote health and the maintenance of exercise activities. Although requirements for certain micronutrients are affected by aging, vitamin and mineral supplements are unlikely to be necessary for healthy adults and should meet basic criteria for safety if they are prescribed. Diet sources of calcium may require attention, although iron requirements are reduced among postmenopausal women when compared with younger athletes. Adequate fluid replacement is essential for athletes of all ages. For the older athlete who is competing in high-intensity endurance exercise, evidence for the usefulness of 4% to 10% carbohydrate-containing sports drinks exists. Little evidence supports the use of ergogenic aids, such as supplements and unusual food products. Resources and personalized guidance from a registered dietitian can be helpful for many older athletes.

 
Nutrition of the older athlete



How do you see the whole article?

I'm being simple...
 
Since meeting my partner a year ago (I'm now 46 as is she.), I have been doing a lot more phys, started off running but she was not quite up to speed. I was able to do 3 miles in high 25's, she was doing 28's.
Then she and I coincidently managed to pull our calf muscles within a month of each other so we went on to Alphabet circuit training and that worked well for a while. After getting board of constant circuit traing we moved on to Fartlekking and we now really enjoy it.

Running is boring as f**k to me,sometimes I just cannot be arsedplodding around for 25-40 minutes. But Fartlekking? Bloody brilliant, really fun and can do it for 45-60 minutes easily. Looking to do longer soon.
We don't do traditional fartlekking though we use a timer on my smart watch and do minute on minute off, speed march speed walk then fast ish run and back to walk when the timer says rest.

Tonight though was the fastest. 40 minutes and averaging mid 6 minute miles on the run stages with a 5.40 average mile for the last minute run workout. Only slow bit was when it was dark in the woods and she wasn't quite happy with her footing on the rutted tracks.

I doubt I will bother with running again, Fartlekking gets your heart rate up and down 120 up to 160 then back to 120-130 so I believe that it is better, also I feel that it is better for the knees and hips as it is less constant pounding (we try to stick to non metal roads as well).
 
Since meeting my partner a year ago (I'm now 46 as is she.), I have been doing a lot more phys, started off running but she was not quite up to speed. I was able to do 3 miles in high 25's, she was doing 28's.
Then she and I coincidently managed to pull our calf muscles within a month of each other so we went on to Alphabet circuit training and that worked well for a while. After getting board of constant circuit traing we moved on to Fartlekking and we now really enjoy it.

Running is boring as f**k to me,sometimes I just cannot be arsedplodding around for 25-40 minutes. But Fartlekking? Bloody brilliant, really fun and can do it for 45-60 minutes easily. Looking to do longer soon.
We don't do traditional fartlekking though we use a timer on my smart watch and do minute on minute off, speed march speed walk then fast ish run and back to walk when the timer says rest.

Tonight though was the fastest. 40 minutes and averaging mid 6 minute miles on the run stages with a 5.40 average mile for the last minute run workout. Only slow bit was when it was dark in the woods and she wasn't quite happy with her footing on the rutted tracks.

I doubt I will bother with running again, Fartlekking gets your heart rate up and down 120 up to 160 then back to 120-130 so I believe that it is better, also I feel that it is better for the knees and hips as it is less constant pounding (we try to stick to non metal roads as well).

Now that's a coincidence. I've pulled both calf muscles in the last 12 weeks and they are repeatedly going and its bloody agony. The mrs who also runs just did her left one and now believes the pain level I'm gently whinged about for weeks. The running was stop/start as a result with me having to take 6-10 day rest period, but the calf muscles kept going. They've only settled down since I've started weights again with the gyms opening up.

Anyway - I'm 56 next month. I'm running 2-3 x 5 milers/week and doing 3 x 1 hour full weight sets/week during which I work out all muscle groups. The running and weights work well together and are mutually complementary. Its made a huge difference to my levels of fitness, strength and flexibility, although I do get depressed when I synch my Garmin as I've got records going back years and its pretty depressing looking at the extent to which I've slowed down. I can remember how fast I was even in my early 40s and it feels like a snail's pace in comparison - every time I run I keep remembering what I was like 15 years ago. Hey ho..... Thats said, I'm reasonably pleased with where I have managed to get to as I came down with Covid really badly in early Mach and it took me about 14 weeks to get back into the exercise (with much reduced lung capacity, which is OKish now). I cant decide if I'm just an old cnut or I'm still living with the after effects of Covid as my times are not improving. I guess I'm not pushing myself.

Food wise - in the week its a light breakfast, early (large) lunch - generally chicken and salad and a very light tea (generally about 1630hrs ish). Weekends are where it turns to shit with 12 pints necked over the weekend and probably one major binge a month which is a very heavy session. I did pack in alcohol for about 6 months a couple of years ago, but felt life is too short.

Diet at the weekend is generally not too bad but I'd say I yo yo (weekdays and weekend), and as a consequence, I'm stuck at about 13.5 stones which at 6' is not too bad. If I cut the alcohol out for a couple of months, I'd probably get it down to 13 stone, but the way I look at it, I'm never going to run distance again, or run around carrying heavy stuff, so I'm sort of OK with where I am.

As for the running, there is nothing better than when you are fit. Absolutely love it, although the knees are giving me a bit of grief.....
 
Hello fellow old farts with young pretensions. Hope you all had a great Christmas and now are ready to squeeze into the 30 year old Ron Hills and hit the trails.

I got over the lightheadedness that prompted this thread by improving my diet ie, eating more and also the drop in temperature after the summer helped. In fact I upped my milage to about 30km per week in October.

Now to the point of this post - my daughter gave me a Garmin Forrunner 35 watch for Christmas. I hooked it up to my Strava account and was rather alarmed by my first heart rate result on a 6km run. Using the formula for Max heart rate of 220 - age (58 = 162, my average BPM on the run was 165, hitting a maximum of 179. Is this dangerous? Am I destined to a life of going for long walks now?
 
Hello fellow old farts with young pretensions. Hope you all had a great Christmas and now are ready to squeeze into the 30 year old Ron Hills and hit the trails.

I got over the lightheadedness that prompted this thread by improving my diet ie, eating more and also the drop in temperature after the summer helped. In fact I upped my milage to about 30km per week in October.

Now to the point of this post - my daughter gave me a Garmin Forrunner 35 watch for Christmas. I hooked it up to my Strava account and was rather alarmed by my first heart rate result on a 6km run. Using the formula for Max heart rate of 220 - age (58 = 162, my average BPM on the run was 165, hitting a maximum of 179. Is this dangerous? Am I destined to a life of going for long walks now?
Technically you died a year or two ago.
 
Hello fellow old farts with young pretensions. Hope you all had a great Christmas and now are ready to squeeze into the 30 year old Ron Hills and hit the trails.

I got over the lightheadedness that prompted this thread by improving my diet ie, eating more and also the drop in temperature after the summer helped. In fact I upped my milage to about 30km per week in October.

Now to the point of this post - my daughter gave me a Garmin Forrunner 35 watch for Christmas. I hooked it up to my Strava account and was rather alarmed by my first heart rate result on a 6km run. Using the formula for Max heart rate of 220 - age (58 = 162, my average BPM on the run was 165, hitting a maximum of 179. Is this dangerous? Am I destined to a life of going for long walks now?

Probably not. The 220- your age formula is a rough guess at best. My max pulse is closer to 195-200 BPM and I'm over 50. I ran a 10k a couple of hours ago, and my average pulse was 166 BPM. That's pretty much normal for me.

I've heard some people say that you can't trust wrist mounted heart rate measurement, but I had similar results with a chest strap, so I reckon it's reasonably correct.
 
Hello fellow old farts with young pretensions. Hope you all had a great Christmas and now are ready to squeeze into the 30 year old Ron Hills and hit the trails.

I got over the lightheadedness that prompted this thread by improving my diet ie, eating more and also the drop in temperature after the summer helped. In fact I upped my milage to about 30km per week in October.

Now to the point of this post - my daughter gave me a Garmin Forrunner 35 watch for Christmas. I hooked it up to my Strava account and was rather alarmed by my first heart rate result on a 6km run. Using the formula for Max heart rate of 220 - age (58 = 162, my average BPM on the run was 165, hitting a maximum of 179. Is this dangerous? Am I destined to a life of going for long walks now?
That's for an average - it's a big paint brush - I run high at 51 I've hit 180's and regularly get into the 170's when working hard.

Only thing I find is that if I have a prolonged period, say 20 minutes, at that rate I can really feel it and I'm proper shagged for a few days, need to recover for much longer. The other thing I've found is that my immune system takes a dive if that happens - often got heavy colds afterwards.

But otherwise, no issues if that's just spikes.

On another note, training up in the 160's all the time won't hurt you but it's not always the greatest for actually improving stuff.

The Garmin will sort stuff out and work out where your zones are.
 
Nothing wrong with a good fast walk either. Just keep the tempo up (6-8 km/h)

Your heart rate will be lower, but it's still good exercise. Did around 4 miles yesterday, with an average pulse of 132.
 
That's for an average - it's a big paint brush - I run high at 51 I've hit 180's and regularly get into the 170's when working hard.

Only thing I find is that if I have a prolonged period, say 20 minutes, at that rate I can really feel it and I'm proper shagged for a few days, need to recover for much longer. The other thing I've found is that my immune system takes a dive if that happens - often got heavy colds afterwards.

But otherwise, no issues if that's just spikes.

On another note, training up in the 160's all the time won't hurt you but it's not always the greatest for actually improving stuff.

The Garmin will sort stuff out and work out where your zones are.
Interesting point about immune systems , at 50+ it probably more important to improve that than your heart/lungs , how you improve your immune system I dont know ?
 
Interesting point about immune systems , at 50+ it probably more important to improve that than your heart/lungs , how you improve your immune system I dont know ?
I guess it's about balance within the body - it functions at it's best when everything else is looked after and inflammation is kept to a minimum.
 
Hello fellow old farts with young pretensions. Hope you all had a great Christmas and now are ready to squeeze into the 30 year old Ron Hills and hit the trails.

I got over the lightheadedness that prompted this thread by improving my diet ie, eating more and also the drop in temperature after the summer helped. In fact I upped my milage to about 30km per week in October.

Now to the point of this post - my daughter gave me a Garmin Forrunner 35 watch for Christmas. I hooked it up to my Strava account and was rather alarmed by my first heart rate result on a 6km run. Using the formula for Max heart rate of 220 - age (58 = 162, my average BPM on the run was 165, hitting a maximum of 179. Is this dangerous? Am I destined to a life of going for long walks now?
The average BPM would concern me, not the peak. It’s a combat indicator that your cardio-vascular system isn’t working efficiently. Your Forrunner will give you a VO2 Max reading; check it to see where you are. Here’s a link to the relevant instructions Forerunner 230/235 - About VO2 Max. Estimates

Another poster on here got me on to Phil Maffetone and his method for improving aerobic fitness. Maffetone uses a different method for identifying target heart rate; you then train at that heart rate and do regular tests. Have a look at it; since starting in late 2019, my VO2 Max has improved from high 20s to 33-35.
 
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