running in basic?

#1
i was just watching one of the army dvds i got before adsc, and it was showing the bit at adsc where you speak to recruits in training, and it said these guys were at the 6/7 week mark, and the longest run they had done was 6 miles.

is this representative of 'real' basic, or is that the watered down, get people through the door version?
 
#2
No, the first thing that happens when you tip up at 'basic' is you are introduced to your senior Drill Instructors (DIs), affectionally called 'Chutney Ferrets' because of their habit of stealing the new recruits allotment of Chutney. After you have been introduced to your Chutney Ferrets, you will then (this is about 1400 on the first day) be taken for a 15 mile forced run, which sorts the men from the remfs (retarded & educationally mis-fitted, also known as Infantry men). You will be given bonus marks for using these terms on a regular basis, to describe both your squad leaders, and the Infantry men in your section- this will also endear you to your instructors. I hope this gives you a slightly better view of 'real' 'basic'.
 
#3
i am at week 9 and the furthest i have run is "6" miles, that is the furthest we have been told we are allowed to run. the PTI's will run you further then they are allowed as it all running up and down hills etc.

you will have an initial medical , and then you will do an RMT which included 1.5m run and ammo box lifting jerry can lifts. depending on your cap badge/trade aswell now.
 
#6
You dont stop but you dont run at the speed you would run the 1.5 (i hope) because your not trying to run for speed, your running for endurance.

Correct me if im wrong
 
#7
Reading this what surprises me is that some people seem terrified of the idea of running, and I fail to see that if you join The Army this should be so.
If you realize that it will be a progressive build-up and not, Day 1 'Grab that sand-filled bergen and follow me for a ten-miler', then where is the problem.
Fitness and stamina are important and how else does one improve but by getting out and doing?
Why join up and then whimper about the physical side?
 
#8
Dwarf said:
Reading this what surprises me is that some people seem terrified of the idea of running, and I fail to see that if you join The Army this should be so.
If you realize that it will be a progressive build-up and not, Day 1 'Grab that sand-filled bergen and follow me for a ten-miler', then where is the problem.
Fitness and stamina are important and how else does one improve but by getting out and doing?
Why join up and then whimper about the physical side?
im not! i was if anything saying i thought it would be more then that. in my training sessions i do 6 milers, including some fairly steep hills, in a reasonable time with no problem. obviously being tired, and stiff from exercise everyday will add to the challenge, and im not saying it looks easy, but i had visions of like 10 mile runs by week 5/6.
but hey, i suppose finding out its not as hard as i thought it would be is better then underestimating it, and suffering for the whole time.
 
#10
Do they still do the "Brecon 2 Miler" 35lbs of kit, less - water, helmet & rifle - I think it had to be done in 20mins .... ah they were the days - says he sat at his desk .... oh and we used to have to run in boots - which was a novelty!
 
#11
christheclimber said:
Dwarf said:
Reading this what surprises me is that some people seem terrified of the idea of running, and I fail to see that if you join The Army this should be so.
If you realize that it will be a progressive build-up and not, Day 1 'Grab that sand-filled bergen and follow me for a ten-miler', then where is the problem.
Fitness and stamina are important and how else does one improve but by getting out and doing?
Why join up and then whimper about the physical side?
im not! i was if anything saying i thought it would be more then that. in my training sessions i do 6 milers, including some fairly steep hills, in a reasonable time with no problem. obviously being tired, and stiff from exercise everyday will add to the challenge, and im not saying it looks easy, but i had visions of like 10 mile runs by week 5/6.
but hey, i suppose finding out its not as hard as i thought it would be is better then underestimating it, and suffering for the whole time.
I wasn't talking about you lad, it was a general question aimed at those who want to be a hero and complain when they find that they have to work at it and it doesn't come on a plate. Also about the easing up of standards by politicos to make life easier for the poor little darlings who have to be cosseted and then shoved into the firefights.
I ran in boots, and granted now that I have passed erm a certain age, Ok fifty, I have to do stretching and yoga to compensate, but it was better than trackies.
 
#16
No idea how it is in the UK (apart from the one sausage rule) but in the SADF I was always hungry, mostly tired from lack of sleep, built like a racing snake and could walk/run forever.

You get used to it.
 
#19
Were you fed sufficient calroies though?
Training cadre aren't complete ******* - they'll know if there are deficiencies in the diet, and will ensure those in need get - and eat - what they require.
The object is to produce fit troops - they aren't personal trainers.
At the ned of basics, the troops had to able to perform to a certain level - running Xkm in Y minutes, 2Xkm in a certain time etc etc etc.
 

Fang_Farrier

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#20

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