Royalist deployments at First Newbury

#1
Does anyone have a good source for the Royalist deployments at the First battle of Newbury? I have the Osprey book, which has a certain degree of uncertainty about it. In particular I want to know where Bolles' and Pinchbeck's regiments were.
 
#6
Yeah, if they'd been using That Rifle instead of That Matchlock, then you'd be interested.

Thanks Queensman, I'd seen that one but it doesn't give me the names of the tercios or regiments.
 
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#8
Does anyone have a good source for the Royalist deployments at the First battle of Newbury? I have the Osprey book, which has a certain degree of uncertainty about it. In particular I want to know where Bolles' and Pinchbeck's regiments were.
I'd suggest you will never know. Much Royalist paperwork was lost/destroyed at the end of the war and making accurate maps and staff reports wasn't a big bit of military activity back then. There is a good chance that the last people who know the information you seek died c 1680-1700. I would also council against trusting Victorian information as some of it appears to me to be complete speculation.
https://content.historicengland.org.uk/content/docs/battlefields/newbury.pdf appears to quote most of the primary sources. I'm not sure who the author of "'The Order of Battle of the Parliamentarian and Royalist Armies at the First Battle of Newbury, 20 Sept. 1643' Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research 42 (1964) pp132-3 is, but if its Peter Young that will probably be the best information available.
 
#9
I've seen a reference for the Peter Young paper, but haven't been able to obtain a copy. I suspect it's the one that most people quote, with some 'incomplete' lists for the Oxford Army.
 
#10
This might help:
Oliver Cromwell and the Performance of Parliament's Armies in the Newbury Campaign, 20 October–21 November 1644 Author(s): MALCOLM WANKLYN Source: History, Vol. 96, No. 1 (321) (JANUARY 2011), pp. 3-25 Published by: Wiley
 

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LE
Kit Reviewer
#12
He means tercios.

Don't ask.
 
#13
He means tercios.

Don't ask.
Couldn't resist. Tried to. Couldn't.

A tercio/tertia (of course, spelling differs in contemporary documents) is the equivalent of a brigade. Regiments were 'brigaded' together in order to make a tactically-interesting sized unit. An infantry regiment should have been around 1000 men, but by 1643 most Royalist regiments were down to 400-ish. Tertias at First Newbury had 6-9 regiments, for an average strength of around 1500 per tertia.

There was no reason why these regiments would have been dressed similarly; regiments wore blue, red, yellow, white or green coats (sometimes even purple or black). Regiments formed up in their tertias by files of six men, so a specific tertia could have presented a rainbow-type appearance, as well as having up to 40-50 six foot square coloured standards flying over the centre of the unit.

The Royalists kept the old regiments going, even down to when they were down to a strength of around 100-150. This was partly because they had lots of left-over officers, who needed jobs. The Parliamentarians united weak regiments under new colonels.
 

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LE
Kit Reviewer
#14
.There was no reason why these regiments would have been dressed similarly; regiments wore blue, red, yellow, white or green coats (sometimes even purple or black). Regiments formed up in their tertias by files of six men, so a specific tertia could have presented a rainbow-type appearance, as well as having up to 40-50 six foot square coloured standards flying over the centre of the unit.
So the mincer dominee - and/or Stonewall - clad in knickerbockers and lace in full eye-scratching & screeching mode.
 

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