Royal Navy submarines to inform climate change research

#4
This is the RN bit of ARRSE. Why are you bringing the Army and RAF into it? :)
Wrong, old boy. This is the forum on the Army Rumour Service where one who serves in the Army can comment (generally adversely) upon the Service that would have difficulty filling a Norther Premier league club's football stadium. I'm very much afraid that the RN's future lies predominately within the fish and weather domain.
 
#5
I am not keen on fish.
 
#6
Totally enthralled-now my life has meaning.
 
#7
Wasn't that how we first broke the German naval enigma codes? They were teutonically efficient in sending regular weather reports in a fixed format. If you knew what the weather was up to, it was rum and medals all round.
 
#8
Wrong, old boy. This is the forum on the Army Rumour Service where one who serves in the Army can comment (generally adversely) upon the Service that would have difficulty filling a Norther Premier league club's football stadium. I'm very much afraid that the RN's future lies predominately within the fish and weather domain.
There's no need to get jealous just because it takes several squaddies to do the job of one matelot. It's not your fault that the minimum reading age for entry as a soldier has been reduced to six years. Is it true that the instructions printed on thunderflashes have been changed from "Ignite fuse then throw away immediately" to "Light up and chuck like ****"

As well as fish and weather, the RN also does a lot of wildlife research - and not just in Johanas/Diamond Lils. You'll never get closer to a Blue Whale than when it's raping the submarine you're trying to navigate under the ice cap. Remember that next time the bin men go on strike and your country needs your specialist, squaddie skills.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
I would imagine that the RN's bathythermograph readings going back years and covering every ocean in the world, if they have been enywhere preserved, would make a treasure trove for oceanographers. I don't think this was recognised in my day and doubt if the readings were kept though.

Oh and for those who don't know the things, a bathythermograph is a thingy you lower into the water and it scribes the temperature on a slide as it goes down, so that you get a graph of temperature against depth.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
The old ship's logs in TNA all have weather (but not bathythermographic) data going back to the year dot, recorded at the end of each watch together with position. Mining this data would however be an enormous job as each log would have to be got up from store and its data typed in to a laptop, day by day, month by month. However all HM Ships and I would hope others used (emissions policy permitting) to radio a noon met report in a standard format (see [does it still exist?] the Admiralty List of Radio Signals ALRS, volume 5 comes to mind but I may be wrong) and one would hope the Met Office has an archive of those. Used to start la la la lo lo lo and go on to give temperature, pressure, wind, sea state etc etc.

The British Library holds the logs of Indiamen which have similar weather records covering Blackwall to Canton and all points in between.
 
#14
This was publicised in the media a few months ago:

National Archives 14 Oct 2011 said:
You can now help scientists understand the climate of the past and unearth new historical information by revisiting the voyages of First World War Royal Navy warships.

Visitors to OldWeather.org will be able to retrace the routes taken by any of 280 Royal Navy ships. These include historic vessels such as HMS Caroline, the last survivor of the 1916 Battle of Jutland still afloat. By transcribing information about the weather and interesting events from images of each ship's logbook, web volunteers will help scientists build a more accurate picture of how our climate has changed over the last century.

'Treasure trove' of information

'These naval logbooks contain an amazing treasure trove of information, but because the entries are handwritten they are incredibly difficult for a computer to read,' said Dr Chris Lintott of Oxford University, one of the team behind the OldWeather.org project. 'By getting an army of online human volunteers to retrace these voyages and transcribe the information recorded by British sailors we can relive both the climate of the past and key moments in naval history.'

Thousands of logbooks, including many from the late 17th century and the 'golden age of sail' of the 18th and early 19th centuries, can be found in The National Archives. The logbook became the formal document recording the progress and management of a ship. It was principally a navigational account in which the speed, course and location of the vessel were carefully recorded on a daily, often hourly basis. It also came to include a written account of life on board, helping historians uncover fascinating details of experiences on the high seas.
 

Guns

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#15
Which is why I went from a believer in global warming to a non believer. I used to write those met signals as an OOW and we I wouldn't put any faith in the results. Sea surface temps taken from the engine room sea water intakes etc.
 

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