Royal Navy & Brit Army to get laser weapons

Obviously - but Phalanx works by using radar to track the incoming missile (or aircraft), aiming the weapon at it, firing a burst, and then using another radar tracking where the shells go, and using the error (how much it misses by) as feedback in a sort of closed loop system

A laser beam is much narrower than a radar beam in any case.

From watching the various videos of tests I've seen over the years the issue seems to be succesfully maintaining a prolonged precise focus on the target. Phalanx and the like presumably have proximity fuses to deal with those last few inches.
 

Yokel

LE
It depends on what you’re targeting.

It might be enough to disturb the airflow around something moving very quickly to then catastrophically destroy its flight path…

By heating up the air in front of the incoming missile and creating turbulence etc - which the small control surfaces will be effected by?

"Where do you fit the bayonet?"

L/Cpl Jones?

From watching the various videos of tests I've seen over the years the issue seems to be succesfully maintaining a prolonged precise focus on the target. Phalanx and the like presumably have proximity fuses to deal with those last few inches.

@jrwlynch may correct me, but I am pretty sure that Phalanx fires a kinetic round of highly dense metal in order to shred any control surfaces, homing head seekers, or structural components it comes into contact with.
 
@jrwlynch may correct me, but I am pretty sure that Phalanx fires a kinetic round of highly dense metal in order to shred any control surfaces, homing head seekers, or structural components it comes into contact with.

Fair enough but there is no "lag" to be dealt with as far as I can see.
 

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
@jrwlynch may correct me, but I am pretty sure that Phalanx fires a kinetic round of highly dense metal in order to shred any control surfaces, homing head seekers, or structural components it comes into contact with.
Primary kill mechanism is getting a tungsten APDS penetrator into the warhead, causing it to detonate/deflagrate (with unfortunate results on its future trajectory)

Secondary is taking out homing head, propulsion and/or control system - which will also work but take longer to cause the missile to ditch/deviate/break up, so would preferably be achieved further out.
 
LaWS has been deployed on several ships since 2014 and seems to have worked well. Not quite a death ray but the power outputs continue to climb.

AN/SEQ-3 Laser Weapon System - Wikipedia

USN is now fielding the next generation - Helios.

Destroyer Preble to get Lockheed high-energy laser in 2022 - Breaking Defense
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