Royal Naval survey ship discovers sunken dhows

#1
Ministry of Defence said:
The Royal Naval survey ship HMS Enterprise is already making significant inroads into navigational safety in Dubai having discovered the previously uncharted wrecks of two dhows in Port Rashid Harbour.

More...
 
#3
The clarity of the mages is impressive.
That's because the RN tub hit the same rock that sank the dhows... you can't see it from the pictures but HMS Enterprise landed between the dhows.
 
#4
Like to see the images they got in Souda Bay.
 
#5
We've been using this gear for close on 20 years.
Admittedly, the graphic resolution is getting better, (Mind you at these depths it bloody well should be.)

Cheers
Gadge
 
#7
And this is interesting or important because...?

...or is it just me thinking that the money spent of keeping MOD PR types in a job could be spent better elsewhere?

Rodney2q
 
#8
Is there actually some biff sitting in mod main building copy and pasting articles from the official mod website onto here? If so, I want that job. Cheers easy
 
#9
Is there actually some biff sitting in mod main building copy and pasting articles from the official mod website onto here? If so, I want that job. Cheers easy
Yes, and at Leach Building, a department of them led by a Commodore.
RN Media Comms is taken very seriously.
 
#10
Just as well they sank, otherwise the crews would have been claiming JSA in Liverpool by now.
 
#11
As well as helping to update some of the 3,300-plus Admiralty Charts which are used by many of the world's seafarers (including the Royal Navy)

A ringing endorsement of the trust the Royal Navy places in the Royal Navy's charts.
 
#12
As well as helping to update some of the 3,300-plus Admiralty Charts which are used by many of the world's seafarers (including the Royal Navy)

A ringing endorsement of the trust the Royal Navy places in the Royal Navy's charts.
There has been nothing wrong with the charts in whichever incident you are alluding to, it's all been down to human error.
 
#13
There has been nothing wrong with the charts in whichever incident you are alluding to, it's all been down to human error.
I'm sure there isn't, the top quote comes from the navy press release, it seemed to me that the brackets indicate a certain amount of suprise from the issuers of said charts.
 
#14
As well as helping to update some of the 3,300-plus Admiralty Charts which are used by many of the world's seafarers (including the Royal Navy)

A ringing endorsement of the trust the Royal Navy places in the Royal Navy's charts.
It's also part of the blurb on the Home Page of the UK Hydrographic Office website:

Charting the world

Welcome to the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO) website.

We provide nautical charts and navigational services of the world’s oceans and ports to support world shipping, including the Royal Navy.

Our Admiralty products and services have been developed over 200 years, and we use the very latest techniques to continue to help protect lives at sea today.
Most of the data has been captured by the Royal Navy over a considerable period so it's probably prudent to point out that its ships rely on it too. Apart from foreign training and fishery protection, the HO is one of the few cash cows the MoD still has, especially since the losses of DESO to UK Trade & Investment in April 2008 and the Met Office to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills in July last year.

A brief history of the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office

The UKHO Archive started life as an accumulation of charts, surveys, reports, books and atlases held within the Admiralty in London. When the Hydrographic Office was established in 1795 the first Hydrographer to the Admiralty Board, Alexander Dalrymple FRS, was charged with arranging and digesting a ‘considerable mass of information’ and was given a clerk to take ‘care of the plans and charts’ that had accumulated in the Admiralty over nearly two centuries. With the expansion in surveying capability after 1815 the number of surveys and, subsequently, printed charts in the Hydrographic Office expanded...

Today the Archive holds over 600,000 surveys, books, charts and files, containing millions of individual letters, reports, photographs and documents. Currently the Archive is undertaking a project to transfer its historical material to The National Archives based at Kew, which involves cataloguing over 250 metres of departmental documents dating from the early 1800s. This is estimated to take three years and will improve access to an important collection of historical naval and hydrographic information.
 
#17
Is there actually some biff sitting in mod main building copy and pasting articles from the official mod website onto here? If so, I want that job. Cheers easy
It's not as easy as it sounds. They have meetings first. On average about 18 hours of meetings, memos and shit e-mails goes in to each 'feed'.
 
#18
The RN probably sank the bloody things in the first place, back in the days when an anti-piracy patrol did what it said on the tin...
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
Do they have a chap or chapess dedicated to going back to ARRSE to record the comments of the brutal and licentious soldiery [(c) Kipling misquoting somebody else] so that the bosses can weep salt tears over the ignorance displayed?

As to the Olympus, it is the general order of things that when a submarine fails to return it is very often not possible to determine where she lies. There are probably several of our boats still out there somewhere .. as the German song has it, No roses grow on a sailor's grave.
 

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