Royal Engineers Reserve

I appreciate all the responses! I'm probably just going to visit a few units and just jump in at the deep end and join one. I just have an image of doing lots of travelling abroad and round the UK. Not sure how much of that will come into fruition though.
go for it.

I smashed out a full career(+) in the regs and then joined the reserves. I don't regard it as a continuation of my career, civvie or former military.

I think it's brilliant. Good lads*, good times, good satisfaction**.

*other genders included.
**like 170, my unit does a fair bit of real time tasking.
 
Which Regiment is this...
Most capbadges do skiing, spaces are thrown out to reserves too. Many regiments and battalions will organise there own too.

Cheapness is a combination of military accommodation and/or exercise funding.

we got several lads away to Europe for a free week of canoeing, hiking, rock climbing etc. When I say free, it's actually minus figures as they were paid to be there.

Although it probably cost the same as in civvie street once drinks were included.
 
Which Regiment is this...
The Queen’s Own Yeomanry. We’re light cavalry, with squadrons in Newcastle, York, Chester and Wigan. We do seem to generate a fair number of good AT opportunities each year, as well as for mobilisations.
 

Leo93

Swinger
Thanks for the advice everyone! It's hard knowing what will be good, but I guess thats jsut part of the whole experience!
 

Leo93

Swinger
Bump. Just for info, I attested into 170 Infrastructure and Support on Saturday. Looking forward to getting stuck into training!
 
Bump. Just for info, I attested into 170 Infrastructure and Support on Saturday. Looking forward to getting stuck into training!
Well done! (no "and" between "Infrastructure" and "Support" btw). Welcome to the unit that probably has one of the longest addresses in the British Army (if you don't abbreviate).

Annual Camp, once you're trained, will be the highlight of the year. It'll be frantic but it'll also show you how much work can be fitted into a limited time when all of your Team pull together to a common purpose.

It's a while away but some tips for Camp:

You'll likely go far away so you'll be at the mercy of the RAF. Book an extra couple of days Leave at the end. This reduces the panic if your return flight is delayed. It doesn't often happen but it can. I was treated to an extra week in Cyprus when the Balkans kicked off and all the flights were reallocated. Or the extra 4 days in The Falklands due to a blizzard. Or the extra week on Ascension when the aircraft broke a window on a bird as it began its departure from Brize Norton.

Camp is 15 days (or maybe a bit longer, depending on flight schedules) of which 2-4 days will be lost travelling. You have to complete your work before going home - there's no nipping back to finish it off. Your day off is dependent on sufficient progress being made on the job. Expect the first week to be tough. It'll involve rushing about and some long hours - 0800 to 2200 (plus an hour of phys each day) won't be unusual*. Provided that your Team is organised and everybody puts the effort in, you'll get your day off, a calm second week and maybe even a second day off.

You'll likely have access to a bar most evenings. Make the most of it as you socialise with people you don't see often but don't kick the arse out of it. You'll be treated as an adult provided that you act like one. You'll be self-policing. That means that you'll be trusted to turn up in the morning on time and without a hangover. Don't betray that trust. Remember that many units see Camp as a dry fortnight living in a ditch and don't get the opportunity to get absolutely steaming for a couple of quid. Not that I'd know, of course.

* There'll be some infantrymen who will scoff at only 15 hours per day but they won't be thinking every minute of that time. Well, they will, but not necessarily on the task at hand.
 

Leo93

Swinger
Well done! (no "and" between "Infrastructure" and "Support" btw). Welcome to the unit that probably has one of the longest addresses in the British Army (if you don't abbreviate).

Annual Camp, once you're trained, will be the highlight of the year. It'll be frantic but it'll also show you how much work can be fitted into a limited time when all of your Team pull together to a common purpose.

It's a while away but some tips for Camp:

You'll likely go far away so you'll be at the mercy of the RAF. Book an extra couple of days Leave at the end. This reduces the panic if your return flight is delayed. It doesn't often happen but it can. I was treated to an extra week in Cyprus when the Balkans kicked off and all the flights were reallocated. Or the extra 4 days in The Falklands due to a blizzard. Or the extra week on Ascension when the aircraft broke a window on a bird as it began its departure from Brize Norton.

Camp is 15 days (or maybe a bit longer, depending on flight schedules) of which 2-4 days will be lost travelling. You have to complete your work before going home - there's no nipping back to finish it off. Your day off is dependent on sufficient progress being made on the job. Expect the first week to be tough. It'll involve rushing about and some long hours - 0800 to 2200 (plus an hour of phys each day) won't be unusual*. Provided that your Team is organised and everybody puts the effort in, you'll get your day off, a calm second week and maybe even a second day off.

You'll likely have access to a bar most evenings. Make the most of it as you socialise with people you don't see often but don't kick the arse out of it. You'll be treated as an adult provided that you act like one. You'll be self-policing. That means that you'll be trusted to turn up in the morning on time and without a hangover. Don't betray that trust. Remember that many units see Camp as a dry fortnight living in a ditch and don't get the opportunity to get absolutely steaming for a couple of quid. Not that I'd know, of course.

* There'll be some infantrymen who will scoff at only 15 hours per day but they won't be thinking every minute of that time. Well, they will, but not necessarily on the task at hand.
Thanks for that! I'm excited to get stuck in. It's a bit of a nightmare trying to get onto training with the backlog but hoping for end of August, we shall see!

What can I expect outside of camp? Adventure training? Weekends etc?
 
Thanks for that! I'm excited to get stuck in. It's a bit of a nightmare trying to get onto training with the backlog but hoping for end of August, we shall see!

What can I expect outside of camp? Adventure training? Weekends etc?
I was retired in 2013, just after the TA became the AR. At about this time, 170 went through an extensive reshuffle, futher integrating the AR into the Regular Works Groups.

What effect this has had on AT, I don't know. I would hope that it has opened up the range of activities. By that, I really mean that the AR should become aware of activities other than the well-established ski trip and be less shy about asking if they, either as individuals or as a group, can join in. "Don't ask, don't get" is a phrase well understood by the Regulars but less often used by the TA in the past.

As for weekends, the format is also likely to have changed over the last few years. Previously, the AR trained en masse with the few embedded Teams getting extra opportunities for training with their Regular associates (though these would likely have involved taking time off work as Regulars would rarely have been working weekends). With the more integrated approach, I would hope that the Regular training syllabus has extended into weekends but I don't know. There was much to be said for training separately (in terms of coordinating training) but the Regular component would have missed out on civilian (more up to date and varied) practices.

You need input from someone still in.
 
Snip/

Infantry Junior NCOs get their first promotion to Lance Corporal after getting thrashed for two weeks by Angry Scotsmen. As it should be. He didn't want to do that so we didn't take him back.

I can't speak definitively about rebadging (changing units) as an Officer, though...
Is there any other sort of Scotsmen?
 
To add to my last, don't forget that AT can be a Corps-wide activity, not just within the Engineer Group so might be worth a punt in the Sapper forum to see what's on offer.
 

Leo93

Swinger
I was retired in 2013, just after the TA became the AR. At about this time, 170 went through an extensive reshuffle, futher integrating the AR into the Regular Works Groups.

What effect this has had on AT, I don't know. I would hope that it has opened up the range of activities. By that, I really mean that the AR should become aware of activities other than the well-established ski trip and be less shy about asking if they, either as individuals or as a group, can join in. "Don't ask, don't get" is a phrase well understood by the Regulars but less often used by the TA in the past.

As for weekends, the format is also likely to have changed over the last few years. Previously, the AR trained en masse with the few embedded Teams getting extra opportunities for training with their Regular associates (though these would likely have involved taking time off work as Regulars would rarely have been working weekends). With the more integrated approach, I would hope that the Regular training syllabus has extended into weekends but I don't know. There was much to be said for training separately (in terms of coordinating training) but the Regular component would have missed out on civilian (more up to date and varied) practices.

You need input from someone still in.
Thanks mate. I am still trying to get my head around the training to join haha! I have my Phase A Alpha booked in for October 23rd-30th then hoping I get can Bravo squeezed in before Christmas. Will be tight.
 

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