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Royal Army?

#2
It's something to do with coming second at The Battle of Hastings [1066] .. apparently the King was very cross with them.

And, being sticklers for tradition, the Army kept it that way.



;-)
 
#3
I was led to believe that the armies of old were raised by wealthy land owners who had had pledged their allegiance to the monach and as sorts had to provide bands of volunteers ....... for war. Hence the reason we have a our regimental system, which comes from these local volunteer forces
 
#4
Mr_Deputy said:
Because the army are revolting...or they revolted in the civil war...or something like that.
Interesting theory.

But ... not all the Army was revolting, so why are most Regiments "Royal".
Have they been forgiven, or did they not take part in the Civil War?
And what did the AGC do to annoy King Charles I?

It does not compute, Captain.
 
#6
There was a standing Navy, but no standing army. Only the great artillery (boom not bang) and various supply posts existed, and mainly officers and their few chaps.

There is still no standing air force, sitting up in their vchairs to order another Pimm's is the nearest vertical they get.
 
#9
whiffler said:
There was a standing Navy, but no standing army. Only the great artillery (boom not bang) and various supply posts existed, and mainly officers and their few chaps.

There is still no standing air force, sitting up in their vchairs to order another Pimm's is the nearest vertical they get.
... and the RE Balloon School begat the RE RE Air Battalion, and the RE Air Battalion begat the Royal Flying Corps, and the RFC begat the RAF.
... So it's the Army's fault.

Anyway, back to the question on page 1 ... why not The Royal Army?

[=edit .... ah, we've been here before. Going away quietly now .... :oops: [/edit]
 
#11
easesprings said:
I was led to believe that the armies of old were raised by wealthy land owners who had had pledged their allegiance to the monach and as sorts had to provide bands of volunteers ....... for war. Hence the reason we have a our regimental system, which comes from these local volunteer forces
That's right, hence names like Sir John Owen's Regiment of Foote, The Earl of Northampton's Regiment of Foote and Sir Edward Duncombe's Dragoones (from the Civil War).

The Navy, on the other hand, was paid for by the monarch, which was why it has always been Royal.

As an aside, the reason we now have the Civil List, where the monarch gives all of her/his income to the government and gets a lesser amount back from them, was introduced because the maintainance of the Royal Navy got more and more expensive and would have eventually bankrupted the monarchy. The Civil List deal passed that expense on to the government.
 
#12
Chinggis said:
easesprings said:
I was led to believe that the armies of old were raised by wealthy land owners who had had pledged their allegiance to the monach and as sorts had to provide bands of volunteers ....... for war. Hence the reason we have a our regimental system, which comes from these local volunteer forces
That's right, hence names like Sir John Owen's Regiment of Foote, The Earl of Northampton's Regiment of Foote and Sir Edward Duncombe's Dragoones (from the Civil War).

The Navy, on the other hand, was paid for by the monarch, which was why it has always been Royal.

As an aside, the reason we now have the Civil List, where the monarch gives all of her/his income to the government and gets a lesser amount back from them, was introduced because the maintainance of the Royal Navy got more and more expensive and would have eventually bankrupted the monarchy. The Civil List deal passed that expense on to the government.
Who promptly passed it on the the tax payer :(
 
#13
Steven said:
Chinggis said:
easesprings said:
I was led to believe that the armies of old were raised by wealthy land owners who had had pledged their allegiance to the monach and as sorts had to provide bands of volunteers ....... for war. Hence the reason we have a our regimental system, which comes from these local volunteer forces
That's right, hence names like Sir John Owen's Regiment of Foote, The Earl of Northampton's Regiment of Foote and Sir Edward Duncombe's Dragoones (from the Civil War).

The Navy, on the other hand, was paid for by the monarch, which was why it has always been Royal.

As an aside, the reason we now have the Civil List, where the monarch gives all of her/his income to the government and gets a lesser amount back from them, was introduced because the maintainance of the Royal Navy got more and more expensive and would have eventually bankrupted the monarchy. The Civil List deal passed that expense on to the government.
Who promptly passed it on the the tax payer :(
Good job they didn't have an Air Force then.
Imagine the bill for Typhoon landing on the King's doormat.
 
#14
blue_sophist said:
Steven said:
Chinggis said:
easesprings said:
I was led to believe that the armies of old were raised by wealthy land owners who had had pledged their allegiance to the monach and as sorts had to provide bands of volunteers ....... for war. Hence the reason we have a our regimental system, which comes from these local volunteer forces
That's right, hence names like Sir John Owen's Regiment of Foote, The Earl of Northampton's Regiment of Foote and Sir Edward Duncombe's Dragoones (from the Civil War).

The Navy, on the other hand, was paid for by the monarch, which was why it has always been Royal.

As an aside, the reason we now have the Civil List, where the monarch gives all of her/his income to the government and gets a lesser amount back from them, was introduced because the maintainance of the Royal Navy got more and more expensive and would have eventually bankrupted the monarchy. The Civil List deal passed that expense on to the government.
Who promptly passed it on the the tax payer :(
Good job they didn't have an Air Force then.
Imagine the bill for Typhoon landing on the King's doormat.
Might not have been so expensive if he had to pay for it!
 
#15
Most army regiments were raised after the restoration and most had 'royal' in the title or were a royal 'own' as in Prince of Wales Own. In fact, difficult to think of many that didn't except the county regiments, and some jock ones. (not inc. Guards Regiments that were Royal by default)

But the queen is commander in chief (I think) so all army regiments are loyal to her whether its got royal in the title or not.
 
#16
instinct said:
[
Good job they didn't have an Air Force then.
Imagine the bill for Typhoon landing on the King's doormat.
Might not have been so expensive if he had to pay for it![/quote]

If the current Prince of Wales had been involved in the design it would be covered in turf and run on recycled methane.
 
#17
easesprings said:
I was led to believe that the armies of old were raised by wealthy land owners who had had pledged their allegiance to the monach and as sorts had to provide bands of volunteers ....... for war. Hence the reason we have a our regimental system, which comes from these local volunteer forces
Perfectly true. The Navy, in contrast, has been "Royal" since King Alfred's day. (Not that the title conferred any special benefits - if they weren't fighting the monarch's wars, they weren't paid.) The Army is a much more complex creature. The Civil Wars and Wars of the Roses were particularly divisive: how many regiments whose recruiting base is north of the Humber, carry the title "Royal"?

Cheers,
Cliff.
 
#18
Xerxes_Blue_Cat said:
Most army regiments were raised after the restoration and most had 'royal' in the title or were a royal 'own' as in Prince of Wales Own. In fact, difficult to think of many that didn't except the county regiments, and some jock ones. (not inc. Guards Regiments that were Royal by default)

But the queen is commander in chief (I think) so all army regiments are loyal to her whether its got royal in the title or not.
Sorry to be pedantic, X_B_C - but it's "Prince of Wales's Own". And the infantry regiment thus titled, was the product of amalgamation between the West Yorkshire Regiment (14th Foot - Prince of Wales's Own) & the East Yorkshire Regiment (15th Foot - Duke of York's Own). Titles to be proud of, yes - but far short of monarchic sponsorship.

Cheers,
Cliff
 

Attachments

#19
At the end of WWII the following infantry regiments did not have a crown on their cap badges
The Royal Scots. (The Royal Regiment)
The Queens Royal Regiment (West Surrey)
The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)
The Kings Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster)
The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers
The Royal Warwickshire Regoiment
The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)
The King's Regiment (Liverpool)
The Norfolk Regiment
The Lincolnshire Regiment
The Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert's)
The West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's Own)
The East Yorkshire Regiment
The Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment
The Leicestershire Regiment
The Green Howards (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own Yorkshire Regiment) {They had a coronet on their's}
The Lancashire Fusiliers
Rhe Royal Scots Fusiliers
The Cheshire Regiment
The Royal Welch Fusiliers
The South Wales Borderers
The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)
The Ryal Inniskilling Fusiliers
The Gloucestershire Regiment
The Worcestershire Regiment
The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry
The Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding)
The Royal Sussex regiment
The Hampshier Regiment
The Dorsetshire Regiment
The Prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire)
The Welch Regiment
The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
The Essex Regiment
The Loyal regiment (North Lancashire)
The Northamptonshire Regiment
The Royal berkshire Regiment (Princess Charlotte of Wales's)
The Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment
The King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
The King's Shropshire Light Infantry
The Middlesex Regiment (Duke of Cambridge's Own)
The Wiltshire Regiment (Duke of Edinburgh's )
The Manchester regiment
The North Staffordshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's)
The York and Lancaster Regiment
seafort Highlanders (Ross-Shire Buffs, Duke of Albany's)
The Gordon Highlanders
The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders
The Royal Irish Fusiliers (Princess Victoria's)
The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Princess Louise's)

It might have been easier to type the ones that did but I love the old regimental titles as they carry so much history.So obviously having Royal in the title did not mean a crown was on the cap badge.
 
#20
Basically, the Navy and later the RAF were 'single entities', the Army was set up as a franchise operation (originally Colonels owned their regiments), the exception was the Board of Ordnance which was a government run operation.

Walrus
 

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