Roman dagger found

It's not unusual for a Pugio to have that level of bling on it. This one is just really well preserved and really well restored.
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Roman soldiers spent a lot of money blinging up their kit. Even back then they knew allyness saves lives!
 
The Ides of March cometh...… Sunday actually!
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
Beautiful metalwork, but odd shaped blade, is that normal, or does it have the look of a auxilia type arm from the late roman army ?
With caveat that I'm not a scholar or expert, but that blade shape must have been popular because most of the legion daggers I've seen in museums match it.
 
With caveat that I'm not a scholar or expert, but that blade shape must have been popular because most of the legion daggers I've seen in museums match it.
Regulation pattern
 
The BBC have just released an accurate reconstruction of its owner.

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With caveat that I'm not a scholar or expert, but that blade shape must have been popular because most of the legion daggers I've seen in museums match it.
Compare the photo above by Legz30 and the original.... The indent is almost grip like and seems more elongated. Reminds me more of a celtic leaf blade, than an ordinary pugio.
 
Compare the photo above by Legz30 and the original.... The indent is almost grip like and seems more elongated. Reminds me more of a celtic leaf blade, than an ordinary pugio.
There are at least 3 different types of Pugio, with multiple sub-types of each. They were in use for a very long period, manufacturing wasn't done centrally and soldiers could opt to commission pieces of kit for themselves so there is plenty of variation.

1584108206854.png
 
There are at least 3 different types of Pugio, with multiple sub-types of each. They were in use for a very long period, manufacturing wasn't done centrally and soldiers could opt to commission pieces of kit for themselves so there is plenty of variation.

View attachment 455913
Somehow reminiscent of the gladius.
 
Be good to see a before and after.

Exactly, most iron/steel objects of any age are so encrusted/rusted that any attempt to unclog the metal from the soil would result in total disintegration!
 
I noted that this weapon could be buried with its owner because it was privately owned. (From the OP) Normally the Romans would not do this; they would re-issue an ordinary weapon to someone else. I admit to wondering at the difference.
 
More on things bladey, though this one far older than Rome.

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'A doctoral student has discovered the world’s oldest sword dating back 5,000 years in a small museum in Italy. What makes the discovery even more amazing is that Vittoria Dall'Armellina found it unintentionally. Dall'Armellina, a PhD student in archaeology at Ca’ Foscari University, Venice embarked on a “pleasure trip” to Mekhitarist Monastery, located on Saint Lazarus Island in the Venetian Lagoon.

'The Mekhitarist Monastery, which is the headquarters of the Armenian Catholic Church, has a small museum, where Dall'Armellina discovered the sword among other weapons. In an interview with LiveScience, she said the unusual shape of the weapon made her realise that the sword was not a medieval weapon and was made significantly earlier. "I thought that I knew that type of sword and that I was certain it was contemporary with those of Arslantepe and Sivas", Dall'Armellina told LiveScience referring to swords that date to 3,000 BC.'


 
More on things bladey, though this one far older than Rome.

View attachment 455930

'A doctoral student has discovered the world’s oldest sword dating back 5,000 years in a small museum in Italy. What makes the discovery even more amazing is that Vittoria Dall'Armellina found it unintentionally. Dall'Armellina, a PhD student in archaeology at Ca’ Foscari University, Venice embarked on a “pleasure trip” to Mekhitarist Monastery, located on Saint Lazarus Island in the Venetian Lagoon.

'The Mekhitarist Monastery, which is the headquarters of the Armenian Catholic Church, has a small museum, where Dall'Armellina discovered the sword among other weapons. In an interview with LiveScience, she said the unusual shape of the weapon made her realise that the sword was not a medieval weapon and was made significantly earlier. "I thought that I knew that type of sword and that I was certain it was contemporary with those of Arslantepe and Sivas", Dall'Armellina told LiveScience referring to swords that date to 3,000 BC.'



That one is made from copper, an ingredient of bronze which doesn't corrode or rust anywhere near as bad as iron/steel.
This lot, believed to be c. 3000 years old, were found near the Thames a year ago
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4(T)

LE
Since the Romans obviously knew a lot about stabbing people, I assume that the leaf shape of their later blades must have some function that made the process more efficient.
 

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