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Roman Coin Hoard Discovered ... In Poland!?!

Makes rather more sense as it was loot from the various 'barbarian' nations crashing around Northern Europe during the period of the decline and eventual fall of the Western Roman Empire.

'One of the largest ever hauls of treasure from the Roman period to be found in Poland and the largest ever in the Lublin region has been uncovered in Hrubieszów near Lublin.

'Excited archaeologists think that the treasure of 1,753 silver coins weighing over five kilos was abandoned in the last stand of the Vandals before fleeing from the arriving Goths at the end of the second century AD when Europe was in upheaval as the Western Roman empire was collapsing. The coins were not in one place, but were spread by agricultural machines over 100 m. In total, 1,753 coins were discovered. The coins were dated to the second century as they bear the image of Roman emperors Nerva, who ruled 8 November 30 to 27 January 98, and Septimus Severus, 11 April 145 to 4 February 211.

'The area was inhabited by Vandals at the time, who were pushed out by Goths in the great wandering of peoples from Scandinavia to southern Europe at the end of the second century. Other finds in the region suggest that the departure of the Vandals was a time of great violence. “It seems that this is where the Vandals lost the means to continue fighting!” he added.

'The archaeologist underlined how important the find is for understanding the downfall of the Vandals in the region. “They had to get rid of huge financial resources that were necessary to wage war with the Goths, and therefore they ended up helpless. The hidden coins remained under Hrubieszów. They couldn’t come back for them and could not recruit soldiers. That is why the Goths peacefully spread to the whole south-east and occupied Ukraine,” he said.'


 
Makes rather more sense as it was loot from the various 'barbarian' nations crashing around Northern Europe during the period of the decline and eventual fall of the Western Roman Empire.

'One of the largest ever hauls of treasure from the Roman period to be found in Poland and the largest ever in the Lublin region has been uncovered in Hrubieszów near Lublin.

'Excited archaeologists think that the treasure of 1,753 silver coins weighing over five kilos was abandoned in the last stand of the Vandals before fleeing from the arriving Goths at the end of the second century AD when Europe was in upheaval as the Western Roman empire was collapsing. The coins were not in one place, but were spread by agricultural machines over 100 m. In total, 1,753 coins were discovered. The coins were dated to the second century as they bear the image of Roman emperors Nerva, who ruled 8 November 30 to 27 January 98, and Septimus Severus, 11 April 145 to 4 February 211.

'The area was inhabited by Vandals at the time, who were pushed out by Goths in the great wandering of peoples from Scandinavia to southern Europe at the end of the second century. Other finds in the region suggest that the departure of the Vandals was a time of great violence. “It seems that this is where the Vandals lost the means to continue fighting!” he added.

'The archaeologist underlined how important the find is for understanding the downfall of the Vandals in the region. “They had to get rid of huge financial resources that were necessary to wage war with the Goths, and therefore they ended up helpless. The hidden coins remained under Hrubieszów. They couldn’t come back for them and could not recruit soldiers. That is why the Goths peacefully spread to the whole south-east and occupied Ukraine,” he said.'


So the Romans got all the way from England to Germany? Wow
 
Hmm that's intriguing. It may have been a time of upheaval, as you say it may have been loot taken from other tribes over a period of time. But the Roman empire, whilst it had it's crises didn't collapse till the early fifth century
 
What happen to to Nazi gold train in Poland?
Oh nothing.
 

4(T)

LE
Hmm that's intriguing. It may have been a time of upheaval, as you say it may have been loot taken from other tribes over a period of time. But the Roman empire, whilst it had it's crises didn't collapse till the early fifth century


Yes, the coin dates are peak Roman Empire.

Interesting that they seem to be a single large batch. I wonder if it was some sort of single large payment from a Roman provincial treasury to the tribe for something - land, troops, labour force?
 
Yes, the coin dates are peak Roman Empire.

Interesting that they seem to be a single large batch. I wonder if it was some sort of single large payment from a Roman provincial treasury to the tribe for something - land, troops, labour force?
Well odd certainly. If it was coinage for a political bribe at any given time, it would probably be from one reign. I can’t recall Roman presence that Far East from my limiting reading, but it might have made it’s way up from present day Romania Dacia or somewhere like that. Didn’t we have a discussion some time back, I thought the Goths wound up in Spain and visigoths in North Africa.
 
Yes, the coin dates are peak Roman Empire.

Interesting that they seem to be a single large batch. I wonder if it was some sort of single large payment from a Roman provincial treasury to the tribe for something - land, troops, labour force?
PCP on a chariot?
 
Well odd certainly. If it was coinage for a political bribe at any given time, it would probably be from one reign. I can’t recall Roman presence that Far East from my limiting reading, but it might have made it’s way up from present day Romania Dacia or somewhere like that. Didn’t we have a discussion some time back, I thought the Goths wound up in Spain and visigoths in North Africa.
The Goths did get as far as Spain but they didn't enjoy it because they insisted on wearing big black leather coats and platform chariot boots even in the summer.
 

mcphee1948

War Hero
So the Romans got all the way from England to Germany? Wow
Didn't the Roman Army try to penetrate deep into Germany, with the aim of establishing a big new Roman province, but got driven back to the Rhine after losing three legions in the attempt.
 
Sounds grisly, but was a body nearby?

Istr Viking custom involved the killing of a 'sentry' to ensure that the gold got to the owner in the afterlife.

If it had been me, I'd have drunk it all by the time the 'owner' joined me.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Didn't the Roman Army try to penetrate deep into Germany, with the aim of establishing a big new Roman province, but got driven back to the Rhine after losing three legions in the attempt.

The expansion of eth Roman Empire was complex, they often tried to keep a layer of buffer states around around. Their loyalty maintained by a combination of bribery and military power.

Scotland is a fine example of that
 
Yes, the coin dates are peak Roman Empire.

Interesting that they seem to be a single large batch. I wonder if it was some sort of single large payment from a Roman provincial treasury to the tribe for something - land, troops, labour force?

But even the peak Roman Empire didn't do anything more than establish trading posts east of the Elbe, and Lublin is east of the Vistula, almost up to the Ukrainian border. Dacia is mentioned elsewhere in the thread, but this short-lived Roman province was hemmed in to the north by the Carpathian Mtns, and was itself in trouble in the 3rd C and lost completely by 275AD.

Lublin-PolandMap.jpg
 
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Hmm that's intriguing. It may have been a time of upheaval, as you say it may have been loot taken from other tribes over a period of time. But the Roman empire, whilst it had it's crises didn't collapse till the early fifth century

Agreed, but had been in decline since the 2nd C AD, and Lublin is a long way north-east through the German forest.

From Wiki - 'The Roman Empire reached its greatest geographical extent under Trajan (r. 98–117), who ruled a prosperous state that stretched from Armenia to the Atlantic.'

1280px-RomanEmpire_117_svg.png
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Didn't the Roman Army try to penetrate deep into Germany, with the aim of establishing a big new Roman province, but got driven back to the Rhine after losing three legions in the attempt.

The latest evidence suggests that Rome was building an extensive series of settlements beyond the Rhine when Arminius pulled the Germans together and, as you say, wiped out three legions. It does beg the question as to how different the history of Europe might have been had the Rhine not become a defining border.
 
The latest evidence suggests that Rome was building an extensive series of settlements beyond the Rhine when Arminius pulled the Germans together and, as you say, wiped out three legions. It does beg the question as to how different the history of Europe might have been had the Rhine not become a defining border.

Yes, a fascinating 'what-if' had the Romans been able to maintain a military presence on the North German Plain rather than only in the area around Mainz. For the timeline of this article though, NB that the ambush at Kalkriese was over 200 years before this supposed event, in 9 AD.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Yes, a fascinating 'what-if' had the Romans been able to maintain a military presence on the North German Plain rather than only in the area around Mainz. For the timeline of this article though, NB that the ambush at Kalkriese was over 200 years before this supposed event, in 9 AD.

Also, a more forward position in Germany would have reduced the overstretch inherent in defending the far longer Rhine/Danube frontier from the mass immigration which ultimately did for the empire.
 
Makes rather more sense as it was loot from the various 'barbarian' nations crashing around Northern Europe during the period of the decline and eventual fall of the Western Roman Empire.

'One of the largest ever hauls of treasure from the Roman period to be found in Poland and the largest ever in the Lublin region has been uncovered in Hrubieszów near Lublin.

'Excited archaeologists think that the treasure of 1,753 silver coins weighing over five kilos was abandoned in the last stand of the Vandals before fleeing from the arriving Goths at the end of the second century AD when Europe was in upheaval as the Western Roman empire was collapsing. The coins were not in one place, but were spread by agricultural machines over 100 m. In total, 1,753 coins were discovered. The coins were dated to the second century as they bear the image of Roman emperors Nerva, who ruled 8 November 30 to 27 January 98, and Septimus Severus, 11 April 145 to 4 February 211.

'The area was inhabited by Vandals at the time, who were pushed out by Goths in the great wandering of peoples from Scandinavia to southern Europe at the end of the second century. Other finds in the region suggest that the departure of the Vandals was a time of great violence. “It seems that this is where the Vandals lost the means to continue fighting!” he added.

'The archaeologist underlined how important the find is for understanding the downfall of the Vandals in the region. “They had to get rid of huge financial resources that were necessary to wage war with the Goths, and therefore they ended up helpless. The hidden coins remained under Hrubieszów. They couldn’t come back for them and could not recruit soldiers. That is why the Goths peacefully spread to the whole south-east and occupied Ukraine,” he said.'



Having read the link, it doesn't present any evidence that they were buried there in Roman times, like what is suspected of the roman coins found in Iceland they could have been placed there afterwards.
 
Having read the link, it doesn't present any evidence that they were buried there in Roman times, like what is suspected of the roman coins found in Iceland they could have been placed there afterwards.

Other than that there were apparently no other dateable coins or valuables from later periods found at the site.
 

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