Road Kill

I couldn't think of anywhere else to ask this, have done a bit of googlifying but not really come up with an answer.
So, in England I come across(or hit with my car)a Roe Deer that has very recently been hit by a vehicle and is dead. If I drag the said animal to the side of the road and very crudely hack lumps off it to take home for the freezer am I liable to get into trouble from the old bill. Without a doubt if I was spotted doing this, someone would ring the plod and they would attend, probably to find me up to my elbows in blood removing back legs and back meat from the donor animal.
Of course sensible thing to do would be load the animal into my car and take it home, however my car is not kitted out on a daily basis to transport a fresh bleeding carcase.
Any thoughts or factual advice would be appreciated.
Also I await with anticipation to see how the Thread Drift goes. ;)
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
I couldn't think of anywhere else to ask this, have done a bit of googlifying but not really come up with an answer.
So, in England I come across(or hit with my car)a Roe Deer that has very recently been hit by a vehicle and is dead. If I drag the said animal to the side of the road and very crudely hack lumps off it to take home for the freezer am I liable to get into trouble from the old bill. Without a doubt if I was spotted doing this, someone would ring the plod and they would attend, probably to find me up to my elbows in blood removing back legs and back meat from the donor animal.
Of course sensible thing to do would be load the animal into my car and take it home, however my car is not kitted out on a daily basis to transport a fresh bleeding carcase.
Any thoughts or factual advice would be appreciated.
Also I await with anticipation to see how the Thread Drift goes. ;)
if you hit it you are not allowed to partake,

what you find on the side of the road though is yours.

the hind legs don't taint as fast and you can remove without breaking into the guts cut around then pop the hip joint.

if you have the time you can peel it there.

for transport rubble sacks and clippits.
 
Hacksaw - binbags - brown tape....
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
Hacksaw - binbags - brown tape....
for gods sake he's after something to eat, NOT disposing of a prostitute.

that's on the DIY thread.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
My FIL hit one on SPTA, knocked it into a ditch and under some branches and foliage.. later that day he just happened to be passing with a mate who was taking his butcher’s tools home to sharpen them...
 
I was driving in northern Ontario and managed to get stuck in gridlock in the middle of nowhere only to find out someone had hit a moose, or as the locals call, a swamp donkey. I have never seen so much blood come out of an animal in my life. The hold up was the OPP were asking anyone with pickup truck if they wanted it before it turned, l asked for just the head and was told to get fcuked. Sometimes the plod have no sense of humour.
 
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the hind legs don't taint as fast and you can remove without breaking into the guts cut around then pop the hip joint.

if you have the time you can peel it there.
While I agree with the rest of your post, you're on dodgy ground if you leave bits behind. That's littering.

Once you take control of it, you take responsibility for all of it.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
While I agree with the rest of your post, you're on dodgy ground if you leave bits behind. That's littering.

Once you take control of it, you take responsibility for all of it.
I wasn't aware of that but I guess it makes sense as they will charge you with anything nowadays - so chuck it further in the verge then - for the rest of the wildlife.

when I'm cycling I can smell a ripe one a hundred yards away.

so when in the past I've stopped to dispatch injured animals I've been littering. bugger.
 
so when in the past I've stopped to dispatch injured animals I've been littering.
Now you're playing with fire. Officially, you shouldn't take it upon yourself to dispatch injured animals. Instead, you should report it to the RSPCA.

What do you think would happen if somebody reported you for kicking the sh1t out of a badger? Could you prove that it was injured beyond recovery before you started lacing into it?

Bit of a moral dilemma, eh?
 

Nomad1382

War Hero
The base I work at, we have Gemsbok wandering around. When one gets hit and either killed or has to be put down we have a "Road Kill" list. the game wardens will gut the animal, you just have to come get it from the roadside and get it butchered. The game wardens estimate the weight of salvageable meat and give you a receipt (25 cents per pound). You have a couple days to go to state Game and Fish and pay the price.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Have had 4 deer strikes in last 10years or so.
Red deer so all large.
Each time however have seen at last second and slowed meaning never quite hit one full on at pace.

They can move fast and cover a lot of rough ground with possibly broken legs!
 
Here in Massachusetts if you kill a deer with your car you can keep the deer if you wish. One night I was driving behind a young woman who killed a deer and damaged her car. The poor girl was crying so I called police and stayed with her waiting for the police. When the police asked her if she wanted to keep the deer for the meat she started crying more.

A cousin was a police sergeant in Maine (NE corner of the US). Many car vs moose collisions involve serious or fatal injuries to the driver. However the area where my cousin worked as a cop had a procedure. The police dispatcher kept a box of index cards with the names of local people who seasonal workers or poor and had kids. The dispatcher would give the number and the cop would call when they had a dead dear or moose. I remember my cousin talking about calls. "Duncan, got a moose at the corner of Route 1 and route 98, big guy, bring your chainsaw"
Eating road kill sounds grim but if you won't work until the lumber mill opens in the spring it is an alternative to feeding the kid mac and cheese all winter.

edited to add: If you wanted to design an animal to penetrate the passenger compartment of a car with BFO horns you would design a moose.
 
The base I work at, we have Gemsbok wandering around. When one gets hit and either killed or has to be put down we have a "Road Kill" list. the game wardens will gut the animal, you just have to come get it from the roadside and get it butchered. The game wardens estimate the weight of salvageable meat and give you a receipt (25 cents per pound). You have a couple days to go to state Game and Fish and pay the price.
Came across a mil convoy that had hit a herd of goats in the road a few years ago. Officer flapping and troops standing around looking confused. Eventually convinced officer to send one bloke with R4 to dispatch any injured goats.

The genius he dicked for the job was unable to hit the thing in the head from point blank range and I ended up directing operations while trying to avoid the wildly swinging muzzle, at the same time as limiting where it was pointed so as not to hit passing civvies in their cars. Clearing it took another few minutes to explain then picking up ejected live rounds from the failed attempts at making safe.

The SANDF is truly a fuck up of epic proportions.
 

Issi

War Hero
A friend of mine hit a cow, and the force of the impact wedged the hind quarters of the beast through his windscreen.
The cow survived, but in its panic completely voided itself, and filled the car to about a foot deep .
 
Now you're playing with fire. Officially, you shouldn't take it upon yourself to dispatch injured animals. Instead, you should report it to the RSPCA.

What do you think would happen if somebody reported you for kicking the sh1t out of a badger? Could you prove that it was injured beyond recovery before you started lacing into it?

Bit of a moral dilemma, eh?
There is no dilemma, it is cruel to allow an animal to suffer needlessly while our government rules are satisfied. The moral thing to do is to dispatch it.
 

ColdWarWorrier

Old-Salt
A neighbour got hold of a road kill deer recently and decided to gift me one of the rear legs.

Unfortunately, it was left on my doorstep in the blazing sun all day and by the time I got home it was a bit ripe and possibly a bit maggoty. I also don’t know how long it was by the roadside before being cut up. I decided binning it was the best option.

I have partaken of road kill venison in the past, as long as I know when it was killed (witnessed). There are a few wild herds locally and there are often road casualties. I’ve come close to hitting some driving down a local road at night.
 
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if you hit it you are not allowed to partake
I think there’s a lot of smoke and mirrors around that one.

The Deer Act 1991 treats entering private land for the purpose of taking of a deer carcass as poaching. Does taking a deer carcass from a public road require the council’s permission? Or is the road public?

The Theft Act defines ownership of wild animals and includes a clause about abandonment. So if you hit a wild deer you’re hitting someone’s property. But if you find a carcass it’s abandoned.

Quite how a feral or wild deer can be an individuals property beats me. The things roam across large areas of land. Most farmers want them gone; they’ve become a massive nuisance.

Bottom line, is anyone going to claim the deer as their property?
 

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