RNoAF CF-104 LN-STF back in the air after 33 years!

Ack-Ack

Clanker
A cold-war supersonic interceptor restored to its former glory flew again at ENBO (RNoAF Air station BODOE)the 28th of September this year. It took 13 years and countless hours to get it ready for its first flight since retirement in 1983. In the cockpit of tail no. 637 was RNoAF test pilot major E. "TAZ" Amdal.
RNoAF operated 45 Starfighters (F-104Gs, CF-104s*, CF-104Ds and TF-104Gs/TCF-104s**) from 1963 to 1983 when it was relieved by the F-16A/Bs.
Locals gave the RNoAF 104s the nickname "Westfjord Bull" due to the roar of its J-79 powerplant!
(*) Canadair-type (**) Dual-control trainers


This "plane-spotter" video is also worth the while!

 

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HE117

LE
what are they running that thing on... chip fat?
 

HE117

LE
Blasphemy Sir! I'll meet you on the sands of Calais, pistols for two, coffee and cognac for one...
I just though it was blowing a bit of smoke...?

..and mine's Laphroig!
 
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Surprised it didn't crash.

When WWII Nazi fighter ace who joined the West German airforce is fired for his objection to the safety record then you might think it is not worth restoring

Erich Hartmann - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lockheed F-104 Starfighter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I believe its nickname was Lawn Dart
It was an honest if demanding Aircraft, scooting about at 50' AGL and just under the Mach on the clock does not leave much room for error.
 
The terms, Widowmaker, Lawndart, etc always got our backs up, those of us who flew it, or maintained it in the RCAF never called it such,
 

HE117

LE
It was an honest if demanding Aircraft, scooting about at 50' AGL and just under the Mach on the clock does not leave much room for error.
I remember them flying out of Prestwick in the 60s.. I believe Scottish Aviation was doing upgrade work on the Luftwaffe ones..
 
I remember them flying out of Prestwick in the 60s.. I believe Scottish Aviation was doing upgrade work on the Luftwaffe ones..
Scottish Aviation was the contractor for third line maintenance on the RCAF's Sabres, CF-100s and !04s up until the late 70s. The Luftwaffe aircraft were maintained by Messerschmitt near Munich.
 

HE117

LE
Scottish Aviation was the contractor for third line maintenance on the RCAF's Sabres, CF-100s and !04s up until the late 70s. The Luftwaffe aircraft were maintained by Messerschmitt near Munich.
Ah... it was a long time ago and they were going too fast to see the Maple Leaf!
 
...Sexiest A/C we ever flew imo...
The 104 has never 'done it' for me I'm afraid; amongst RCAF types, I always preferred the CF-101...



...which was a bit of a beast in comparison!



However, I suspect many Canuks will prefer something even bigger...



Regards,
MM
 
Surprised it didn't crash.

When WWII Nazi fighter ace who joined the West German airforce is fired for his objection to the safety record then you might think it is not worth restoring

Erich Hartmann - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lockheed F-104 Starfighter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I believe its nickname was Lawn Dart
As well as a number of German officials favouring the 104 because of concern for their bank balance, the problem - identified by Winkle Brown and a number of RAF officers - was in no small part because of the lack of training/experience on the part of the pilots in the early years. They went from flying the F-86 and F-84F (and the Hawker Sea Hawk in the case of the Marineflieger) to an aircraft described by a Lockheed test pilot as 'a completely and utterly honest airplane - make a mistake, and it'll kill you' in the operational conditions described by Flash (who might also have mentioned the Wx as a factor in a number of accidents) and the loss rate becomes much easier to comprehend.

The Spanish operated the 104 for several years without suffering a single loss and when you compare the loss rate of the Starfighter with the Lightning, you note that the affection for English Electric's finest interceptor wasn't based upon pilot confidence that they'd go through their career on the beast without ever being in a position to apply for a Martin Baker tie...
 
As well as a number of German officials favouring the 104 because of concern for their bank balance, the problem - identified by Winkle Brown and a number of RAF officers - was in no small part because of the lack of training/experience on the part of the pilots in the early years. They went from flying the F-86 and F-84F (and the Hawker Sea Hawk in the case of the Marineflieger) to an aircraft described by a Lockheed test pilot as 'a completely and utterly honest airplane - make a mistake, and it'll kill you' in the operational conditions described by Flash (who might also have mentioned the Wx as a factor in a number of accidents) and the loss rate becomes much easier to comprehend.

The Spanish operated the 104 for several years without suffering a single loss and when you compare the loss rate of the Starfighter with the Lightning, you note that the affection for English Electric's finest interceptor wasn't based upon pilot confidence that they'd go through their career on the beast without ever being in a position to apply for a Martin Baker tie...
The Spanish Air Force had a grand total of some 16,000 hours on the 104, whereas we retired our birds with 4-5 thousand hours on each airframe.
 
Always thought you guys should've bought F-4s.

Regards,
MM
 
The terms, Widowmaker, Lawndart, etc always got our backs up, those of us who flew it, or maintained it in the RCAF never called it such,
You may have seen the Headmaster at my school in the 60s (at Mossblown, southeast of Prestwick) running around the cricket pitch in small circles, waving his fist and calling you and it many new and original names. He and the school are now long gone, but you helped me cheat at Latin when he would lean out of the window to shout. Thanks.
 
The Spanish Air Force had a grand total of some 16,000 hours on the 104, whereas we retired our birds with 4-5 thousand hours on each airframe.
I suppose all those siestas got in the way of the flying hours...

The point about the Spanish, of course, is that they didn't really build up that much time compared to the RCAF/Luftwaffe et al, and despite that comparative lack of experience of their aircraft, they were able to operate it without loss, suggesting that it wasn't the aircraft which was inherently unsafe as so often claimed, but other factors such as training, operating conditions (the Spanish not, of course, doing much ULL work at high speed in rubbish weather. Indeed, cynics might suggest I could've stopped that last sentence after 'much').

Always thought you guys should've bought F-4s.

Regards,
MM
IIRC - Flash will know - the RCAF identified the F-4 as their ideal aeroplane, but were told by the Defence Minister that they were getting the F-5 (sorry - CF-116...) instead... There was an article in the RCAF journal, or a similar publication a few years ago about this. I'll try and dig out the link.
 
Always thought you guys should've bought F-4s.

Regards,
MM
It was the preferred choice, but we were presented with the Tonka Toy ( aka the F-5) instead, which was a large step backwards. We would have been better off doing a depot level inspection and repair of the Sabres and equipping them with Sidewinders. As a point of interest, the Sabres out of Chatham were told not to harass the CF-5s flying out of St. Jean as they were making them look bad.
 
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