RN Submariner Admits Breaching Official Secrets Act

#2
Wow, DV really does work.
 
#3
Wow, DV really does work.
As a colleague in the Home Office's DSU remarked to me recently, 'If we denied secuirty clearances to all the Home Office staff who have affairs, we would have no one left to work for us.' If someone is going to **** up, they are going to **** up. Developed Vetting will not prevent this.
 
#7
Funnily enough, no I didn't. My SC covers me adequately for both the day job and TA time. if I need to be re-DV'd, I'm sure that someone will tell me...
 
#8
As a colleague in the Home Office's DSU remarked to me recently, 'If we denied secuirty clearances to all the Home Office staff who have affairs, we would have no one left to work for us.' If someone is going to **** up, they are going to **** up. Developed Vetting will not prevent this.
Agreed. I do not think the publicly professed reasons for asking the questions involved in DV are honest reasons.
 
#9
Agreed. I do not think the publicly professed reasons for asking the questions involved in DV are honest reasons.
The vetting regime was introduced to, allegedly, weed out people like, ahem, George Blake. From I could work out, it was often used a tool to identify homosexuals... Can't remember which classic espionage novel talked about this, but it is a valid point. My DV interview was a pretty pointless affair really, the review even more so. Would I betray the UK? No.
 
#10
The vetting regime was introduced to, allegedly, weed out people like, ahem, George Blake. From I could work out, it was often used a tool to identify homosexuals... Can't remember which classic espionage novel talked about this, but it is a valid point. My DV interview was a pretty pointless affair really, the review even more so. Would I betray the UK? No.
It doesn't work. Will PM you.
 
#16
Andrew - "Hi, is that the Russian Embassy?"
Ruski - "Yes, how can I help?"
Andrew - "Err. . not really sure how to put this, but . . err . . ?
Ruski - "You have something secret you wish to tell us?"
Andrew - "Blimey, how did you know that?"
Ruski - "Well I can make you an appointment with our Espionage Department, but unfortunatley he's off today. Can I take you name and number so he can call you back?"
Andrew - "Blimey that's efficient, yes it's Edward Devenney, spelt D-E-V-E-N .. "
Ruski - "I have all that Mr Devenney, Thanks for calling. Is there anything else I can relieve you of today? No? Then thank you for using the Russian Embassy's Secrets Hot line today. Goodbye!"


:roll:
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#18
Hey, I like that link. It's like a shopping list for foreign intelligence agencies. Why spend hours doing research trying to find people to tap into for the UK's secrets, when you can just have a look on Linkedin for anyone DV cleared?

The next thing you need is a friendly contact in a credit reference agency to tell you which of that list are in financial difficulty and you're up and running...

Wordsmith
 
#20
BBC said:
Devenney was charged under the Official Secrets Act for collecting information for a purpose "prejudicial to the safety or interests of the state" between 18 November 2011 and 7 March 2012.

He contacted a foreign embassy in an attempt to pass information to Russia, on the operation of HMS Trafalgar and two other nuclear submarines.
According to Wikipedia, "Trafalgar was decommissioned on 4 December 2009".
 

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