RN and RM Reading list

On War - On War: Amazon.co.uk: Carl von Clausewitz, Michael Eliot Howard, Peter Paret: Books
Some principles of Maritime Doctrine - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1843426226/?tag=armrumser-21
The Influence of Seapower upon history - The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783 Dover Military History, Weapons, Armor: Amazon.co.uk: A. T. Mahan: Books
Utility of Force - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/014102044X/?tag=armrumser-21
Strategy For Action - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1908134003/?tag=armrumser-21
Out of the Mountains - Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerrilla: Amazon.co.uk: David Kilcullen: Books
Wrong Turn - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1595588744/?tag=armrumser-21

Blair's Wars and British Generals - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1409437361/?tag=armrumser-21
One Bullet Away - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0753821877/?tag=armrumser-21
Generation Kill - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0552158933/?tag=armrumser-21
Thunder Run - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1843542838/?tag=armrumser-21
COBRA II - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1843543532/?tag=armrumser-21
Behavioural Conflict

JDP 1-00 Campaigning
JDP 3-00 Campaign Execution
JDP 5-00 Campaign Planning
JDP 0-10 British Maritime Doctrine

Fighting for Peace - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1860465129/?tag=armrumser-21
In the eye of the storm - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0340682450/?tag=armrumser-21
100 Days - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0007436408/?tag=armrumser-21
Lewin of Greenwich - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00AFWLIF4/?tag=armrumser-21

Brown Water, Black Berets - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1557501963/?tag=armrumser-21
Destroyer Command - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1591148499/?tag=armrumser-21

Anatomy of Courage - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1845294866/?tag=armrumser-21
Gunboat Commander - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1844156567/?tag=armrumser-21
Battle of the Narrow Seas - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1848320353/?tag=armrumser-21
British Pacific Fleet - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1848320485/?tag=armrumser-21
Defeat into Victory - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0330509977/?tag=armrumser-21
Slim: Master of War - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/184529226X/?tag=armrumser-21
Rules of the Game - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1591143365/?tag=armrumser-21
Dreadnought - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0099524023/?tag=armrumser-21
Castles of Steel - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0099523787/?tag=armrumser-21

Red Storm Rising - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0006173624/?tag=armrumser-21

That's a fantastic list. Thank you for that.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Goatman, no, HMS Ulysses was based on a Dido class cruiser, probably HMS Royalist that spent a lot of time as flag to a squadron of escort carriers in Home waters and the Arctic.
So the Wiki entry told me....I was thinking more of the end of the book, not least the fact that Edinburgh was called the ship that wouldn't die - on fire and abandoned, she was eventually torpedoed by her own side.

Extract from 'Daily Herald' : The 10,000 cruiser Edinburgh was torpedoed by a U-boat, taken in tow, again hit by a destroyer's torpedo, abandoned, and - because of the weather - sunk by our own forces. One ship of the homeward-bound convoy and three of those on the way to Russia were sunk.
But 90 per cent, of the convoy's war supplies reached their journey's end.
One German destroyer was sunk, another severely damaged, three planes were destroyed and others hit.
An Admiralty communique last night said that when a U-boat torpedoed the Edinburgh on April 30 her steering gear was disabled. She steamed on at a reduced speed. The following afternoon three destroyers made five separate attempts to break through the homeward-bound convoy's escort. All five attacks were driven off, but one ship was sunk. On the morning of May 2 the Edinburgh, now in tow, and her escort of destroyers, were attacked by three German destroyers.
The Edinburgh and our destroyers went into action, sinking one enemy destroyer and damaging another. But the Edinburgh was again hit and had to be sunk. Surviving the May 1 destroyer attack, the convoy bound for Russia was attacked by six Ju.88 dive-bombers. No damage or casualties were suffered. On the evening of May 2 six torpedo-carrying aircraft attacked. Three ships of the convoy were sunk.
This convoy was again unsuccessfully dive-bombed on the following evening.
The Edinburgh finished only in 1939, was bombed in the Firth of Forth in October of that year and later fought in the Mediterranean.
 
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seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
It being 2014 and all that, I thought a selected, short reading list for WW1 at sea might be relevant:

‘A Naval History of World War 1’ Paul G Halpern - the foundation book for this area of study and very objective.

‘The Starvation Blockades of WW1’ Nigel Hawkins (Leo Cooper 2002)
Explores the naval war in the Atlantic and home waters from the point of view of us trying to blockade the Germans, using established Cruiser Rules, and the Germans nearly succeeding in starving us out, using the casual mining of international waters and their new invention of unrestricted U-boat warfare involving the deliberate murder of merchant seamen. Includes a very readable potted history of the entire naval war in its 250pp, and points out that major formal naval battles are a means to an end, not an end in themselves. Also explains clearly the political background particularly regarding neutrals, foremost the USA.

‘Coronel and the Falklands’ (1914) Geoffrey Bennett

‘A Damned Un-English Weapon’ (submarines 1914-18) Edwin Gray

‘Gallipoli’ (1915) Alan Moorhead

‘Jutland’ (1916) Captain Donald Macintyre

‘Sea Warfare’ Rudyard Kipling 1916

‘Under the Black Ensign’ (1914-19) Captain RS Gwatkin Williams
(includes operations based on Archangel & Murmansk, against the Bolsheviks and a hilarious dit about the Chatham Bear)

‘My Mystery Ships’ (1915-17) Rear Admiral Gordon Campbell VC DSO (Q-ship operations)

‘Zeebrugge - St George’s Day 1918’ Barrie Pitt 1958

‘Jane’s Fighting Ships of World War I’ Studio Press (Random House) edition 2001

and Kipling's poem 'The Changelings': http://war-poets.blogspot.co.uk/2011/03/rudyard-kipling-changelings.html
 
Possibly wrongish title/author, but close enough for Government work as we used to say...

A Week in May - Capt David Hart-Dyke (Dad of BBC's Miranda). Describes the loss of COVENTRY during the Falklands.

RN Diver - Tony Groom. Title says it all really. Life and times of a CD.
 

Yokel

LE
Scram! by Harry Benson gives a different view of the Falklands War, that of the Jungly pilot (Wessex 5 in his case). The book starts with the fairly well known loss of two Jungly Wessex on South Georgia and the rescue of the SAS by the Wessex 3 from HMS Antrim (and he describes the ship's role in manoeuvring to put the maximum wind across the deck.) The sinking of the Argentine submarine ARA Santa Fe is mentioned, including the fact that Endurance's Wasps had a different radio fit to the rest of the helicopters. He mentions that the Argentine Prisoners were looked after by the downed Jungly crews - including the now Chief of the Air Staff.

He then describes other aspects of the helicopter war, including a dangerous landing of a Sea King 4 aboard HMS Glasgow. The involvement of Junglies and other helicopters in almost avery aspect of the war is mentioned, including SAR operations after ship losses, or HMS Cardiff's Lynx sucessfully evading Argentine Daggers.

The role played by helicopters, whether it Lynx or Wasp from frigates/destroyers, ASW Sea Kings aboard the carriers and large RFAs, the two Wessex 3s, Jungly Sea Kings and Wessex, RAF Chinooks, and AAC/3CBAS Scouts, has not really been covered in that much detail.

It is interesting to see his discussion of naval issues - the commitments of the last decade have caused the Junglies to lose touch with the experience of shipboard life and maritime operations, so it seems almost strange to read of a time when embarking aboard ship was considered routine and not exceptional. The author also describes the problems of operating near to a carrier recovering fixed wing aircraft. Like all naval aviators who write, he mentions the ships role in safe operations, communicating with an inboard ircraft and steering/flashing up engines so as to put the right wind over the deck.

On a naval helicopter note, Weapons Free by Richard Boswell is the story of the frigate/destroyer borne Lynx during the Gulf War, including the Sea Skua engagements of Iraqi vessels.
 
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seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
I thought I might bump this thread with a snap list of what I think are the top authors on RN subjects;

Captain Frederick Marryat (for the old sailing navy) (his fiction too)
Michael Lewis
Lt Cdr Peter Kemp
Christopher Lloyd
Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan USN
Rear Admiral WS Chalmers
NAM Rodger
Andrew Lambert
Brian Lavery
Lt Cdr John Winton (also for his fiction)
Cdr David Hobbs (for the Fleet Air Arm)
Arthur J Marder
Captain Stephen Roskill (for WW2 at sea)
Captain Donald Macintyre

This list is (vaguely) in historical order of topic although some have covered a very wide range. I have left out autobiographers and some vg authors who have however not produced many titles. Having read many of these against other authors’ treatment of the same period I reckon the names above give a list of thoroughly trustworthy historians.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
Some of the book from the Navy Records Society are excellent reading. They are not conventional history books, but collections of documents. They are the letters, reports and memorandum written at the time and have an immediacy you won't find in any history book.

The Navy Records Society - Home

Two I will call out.

The Navy Records Society - Volumes-works
The Cunningham papers are the papers of ABC. First volume is when he was C in C Mediterranean and is a graphic example of the strains of high command. Second volume is when he was 1st Sea Lord.

The Navy Records Society - Volumes-works
The fine detail of decoding Enigma. The understanding the Allies had of the technical side of how the German signals system worked is gob-smacking.

Wordsmith
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Anything by john winton, but particularly 'we joined the navy' series. Written in the late 1950s it sums up the mentality of an rn undergoing significant change and many of its lessons are still highly relevant to this day. It remains one of the funniest books i've ever read and the bodger is a fine role model!
More seriously his book 'hms leviathan' is a good fictional account of leadership and management which has many pertinent lessons for todays navy.


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
I commend you for your taste and erudition. Although I was khaki, the Bodger - Lt. Cdr. Robert Bollinger Badger - became my role model and hero. The books are insightful, especially with regard to the mindset of senior officers at that time, funny and in parts quite moving. I have searched and eventually sourced a couple ( having read them all when I was much younger) but ome are hard - if not impossible - to obtain and quite expensive. Still brilliant books.
 
"In Which They Served", Brian Lavery.

The book is subtitled "The RN Officer Experience of WW2", but this description doesn't really do justice to the actual focus of the author's work.

The RN has to expand massively to meet the threat. It has to move away from traditional means of identifying, selecting & training potential officers. Here is an engaging & often entertaining account of how this was done.

There's a focus on the role of the 'graduates' in amphibious operations in Normandy, where a very significant number of them served.

Well researched: the author has a clear grasp of - & an infectious enthusiasm for - his subject which makes this a very readable book.
 
It would interesting to read WW2 naval accounts from a Candian prospective as the RCN went from not much to pretty big and very effective.
 

jim30

LE
I commend you for your taste and erudition. Although I was khaki, the Bodger - Lt. Cdr. Robert Bollinger Badger - became my role model and hero. The books are insightful, especially with regard to the mindset of senior officers at that time, funny and in parts quite moving. I have searched and eventually sourced a couple ( having read them all when I was much younger) but ome are hard - if not impossible - to obtain and quite expensive. Still brilliant books.
Maritime Books down in Cornwall reprinted them a few years back - they are well worth picking up if you can. Winton was a former submariner, and I think 'down the hatch' is probably the funniest naval book I've ever read, which also highlights just how messed up the RN was in the late 50s.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Maritime Books down in Cornwall reprinted them a few years back - they are well worth picking up if you can. Winton was a former submariner, and I think 'down the hatch' is probably the funniest naval book I've ever read, which also highlights just how messed up the RN was in the late 50s.
Just been searching for some of Winton's books; one 'Good Enough For Nelson' ( about the Bodger ) is selling for £224! 'Down the Hatch' on Amazon is around £55. I have found a cheaper one, but his stuff must be very collectable.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
It would interesting to read WW2 naval accounts from a Candian prospective as the RCN went from not much to pretty big and very effective.

‘The Corvette Navy’ by James B Lamb gives you just that.

Re HMS Leviathan, Winton served in HMS Eagle in 1956 before moving to submarines and you may assume that's where Leviathan comes from, although published later, possibly because he was made to wait a while. Pusser was not pleased by the runaway success of We Joined the Navy but I can promise you he has the Special Entry bang on. Winton (real surname Pratt) was a contemporary of (eventually AoF Sir) Julian Oswald.
 

jim30

LE
I believe leviathan is based on Eagles first commission. There is a wry dig at the Admiralty in 'ever go to sea' which is probably his weakest book (more horses than ships)
 
I believe leviathan is based on Eagles first commission. There is a wry dig at the Admiralty in 'ever go to sea' which is probably his weakest book (more horses than ships)
Don't knock winning The Derby. The Bodger got a submarine command out of it, IIRC. (The school library had all of them).

The "NATO versus WARPAC" novels ("Frigate", etc) were rather good, too...
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
Earlier fiction by retired officers 'Taffrail', 'Bartimeus' and Gilbert Hackforth-Jones gives a fair picture of naval life in earlier days, all published in the days when a far larger proportion of our people had links to the RN.
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
Just been searching for some of Winton's books; one 'Good Enough For Nelson' ( about the Bodger ) is selling for £224! 'Down the Hatch' on Amazon is around £55. I have found a cheaper one, but his stuff must be very collectable.
Whilst you're looking I also highly recommend Monserrat's "Three Corvettes." Written whilst serving in corvettes first in the Atlantic as Guns and Jimmy, then as CO of his own on the North Sea. Obviously heavily censored for wartime reading but excellent as a snapshot of the wartime navy and very funny too.

I am in possession of many of Winton's books. I shall mark them down as investments in my portfolio.
 

arcticfox042

War Hero
 
Surely the PTT or Dr Alexander Clarke must feature on the list somewhere? :)

Ooh, is that my coat?...

Regards,
MM
 

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