RMP Recruitment Question/ Confussion

#1
Hi guys I’m new to this forum so I apologise for any bone questions in advance, I’ve just finished uni (foundation degree sports studies) and have applied to the Met, but I’m trying to keep my options open in case this goes bell up so I’ve looked and read up on the RAF Police and RMP, to be honest id rather join the RMP over the RAFP, any way I spoke to a recruiter today on the army web page regarding recruitment as I do not have a C grade in maths and this is needed to join, he then said that due to my further education (Btec and Degree) I may be eligible to join but the decision would have to come from the RMP and CO first, so my question is as anybody been recruited this way before and what are my chances of being recruited/ accepted in to the RMP

Cheers in advance

Taffy
 
#2
If the Met don't take you then you're f*cked. They are the easiest farce to get into.

If you have a sports studies degree join the Army, any badge and later join the PT corps. Or if you are only thinking fit as oposed to actually fit then join the RAF as a PTI as you can join direct.

Please, Please for the love of god don't join plod just because you think you are clever. Get some life behind you first.

All the best.
 
#3
Id much prefer the RMP over any other corps as my main goal is to become a police officer after a military career (if I fail the met) and the RMP is related to this job but as the first post says I'm not sure if I'm eligable if any one can answer this question it would be much appreciated as if I can't join the RMP my next port of call is the Royal Marines cheers again
 
#4
Taffy87 said:
Id much prefer the RMP over any other corps as my main goal is to become a police officer after a military career (if I fail the met) and the RMP is related to this job but as the first post says I'm not sure if I'm eligable if any one can answer this question it would be much appreciated as if I can't join the RMP my next port of call is the Royal Marines cheers again
Don't join the civvy police. I did, have 13 years service, 2 commendations and a load of other gubbins under my belt and the job is ****. Most people of my length of service and more who are too close to their pension to **** off and do something else, are crossing of the months till retirement.

Golden days of good old boys looking out for each other and pissing off local villains are gone. Nobody of any calibre is interested in the job these days so they have to recruit ethnics and mongs and fuckwits who dont have the right instincts, common sense, guts etc.
The Met and couple of other forces are the worst/slackest at recruit level as has been mentioned.

However, if you are the one recruit out of about 30 or so on the intake that is any good, then the Met is def the place to be for specialisms later in your career. Mind you, what did you say your degree was in!
You heard it here first.
 
#5
Taffy

Not having GCSE maths is probably going to hold you back regardless of what career you go for. Why not just sort it. It's really not hard, especially if you got a bit of one-on-one tutoring before.

Are you sure you know what exactly what the different jobs you're looking at do? The police is not a nice place to be at the moment, admittedly the Met is better in some ways than others, but in most forces the bad publicity about paperwork and short staffing is not a joke. Trying to plough through literally piles of pointless paperwork at 5am after having worked for 10 hours isn't fun or rewarding.

The police is very different to RMP, even more so with today’s commitments, which is again very different from RM. I don't just mean job role but also socially, family life, colleagues mentalities, esprit de corps, and the freedom and responsibility allocated.

Basically, each person joining each of these careers needs to really want to do the job to put up with the sh1t that comes with them, because it is worse than civvy jobs. The reason people put up with it is the love of the job - so if you want to be happy and successful - make sure you're taking on a job you really want to do, more than anything.

As a graduate have you thought of a commission?
 
#6
johnnyonthespot said:
Taffy87 said:
Id much prefer the RMP over any other corps as my main goal is to become a police officer after a military career (if I fail the met) and the RMP is related to this job but as the first post says I'm not sure if I'm eligable if any one can answer this question it would be much appreciated as if I can't join the RMP my next port of call is the Royal Marines cheers again
Don't join the civvy police. I did, have 13 years service, 2 commendations and a load of other gubbins under my belt and the job is *. Most people of my length of service and more who are too close to their pension to * off and do something else, are crossing of the months till retirement.

Golden days of good old boys looking out for each other and pissing off local villains are gone. Nobody of any calibre is interested in the job these days so they have to recruit ethnics and mongs and fuckwits who dont have the right instincts, common sense, guts etc.
The Met and couple of other forces are the worst/slackest at recruit level as has been mentioned.

However, if you are the one recruit out of about 30 or so on the intake that is any good, then the Met is def the place to be for specialisms later in your career. Mind you, what did you say your degree was in!
You heard it here first.
Couldn't agree more. The level of back stabbing and arrse protecting is just insane. Most cops are in now for a nice cushy ride, sod camaraderie and team work. There is no feeling of job satisfaction and if you're unlucky enough to be in a force where pc's investigate and file their own workload then you've got 75% of your time sitting in an office to look forward to. I know mates with civvy office jobs who spend more time dealing with the public and out of their office than i do. They also get much better resources, don't work weekends or shifts and are paid twice as much... bitter? not me!
 
#7
I didnt have a C or above in GCSE English, seemed to get in without any problems!
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#8
Taffy87 said:
Id much prefer the RMP over any other corps as my main goal is to become a police officer after a military career (if I fail the met) and the RMP is related to this job but as the first post says I'm not sure if I'm eligable if any one can answer this question it would be much appreciated as if I can't join the RMP my next port of call is the Royal Marines cheers again
You may end up being bitterly disappointed with your choice if you decide upon RMP, It isn't what you may be lead to believe. Why they are asking for maths for RMP I'm not quite sure, but perhaps that to whittle down the numbers of applicants as there are many (allegedly...we get the figures from the resident experts every now and then). Nothing in RMP is above the average person in the street. Nothing. You may be better off (I do not speak from experience) by following the advice to join the RAF as a PTI and thereby making use of your degree. Seems a shame to waste your qualification. You could stay in further education and get the maths qualification that you need,join RMP and then apply for a PTI's course and further up the road try to transfer to the PT Corps (but there will be strong competition) of course, but I why take the long route when you can go straight to that trade group with the RAF upon joining?

RMP is full of good blokes. Sadly a good number of those blokes don't hang about for a full career as RMP has never been known for it's expertise in personnel management. There are without doubt some good managers in RMP, but they are swimming in a sea full of mediocrity and self serving tossers, and sadly they find it hard to keep afloat and end up as demoralised as their troops. Very few of the decent ones get through to the higher paid jobs.

The choice is yours mate, but don't hold too much store in RMP. It really isn't that great. There are other jobs within the Army which may interest you. Alternatively, the RAF or indeed the RM, may just be what you are looking for.
 
#9
Shortty said:
Taffy

Not having GCSE maths is probably going to hold you back regardless of what career you go for. Why not just sort it. It's really not hard, especially if you got a bit of one-on-one tutoring before.

Are you sure you know what exactly what the different jobs you're looking at do? The police is not a nice place to be at the moment, admittedly the Met is better in some ways than others, but in most forces the bad publicity about paperwork and short staffing is not a joke. Trying to plough through literally piles of pointless paperwork at 5am after having worked for 10 hours isn't fun or rewarding.

The police is very different to RMP, even more so with today’s commitments, which is again very different from RM. I don't just mean job role but also socially, family life, colleagues mentalities, esprit de corps, and the freedom and responsibility allocated.

Basically, each person joining each of these careers needs to really want to do the job to put up with the sh1t that comes with them, because it is worse than civvy jobs. The reason people put up with it is the love of the job - so if you want to be happy and successful - make sure you're taking on a job you really want to do, more than anything.

As a graduate have you thought of a commission?
Shortty, probably one of the best posts I have read on Arrse.
 
#10
Taffy, my best advice (and I'm new to arrse too) is to get your C in maths. If the RMP is want you want then get your C and apply again, keep pestering them till you get what you want. The worst they can say is no, in which case you've got plan B it seems, or, you can join other corps, there's plenty of choice. Good luck
 
#11
Besides all that do not - for a second - believe that being ex RMP woill give you a leg up over other potential recruits in the met. Ex Forces is what they like - Ex RMP, Ex Infantry, Ex Gunner it matters not.

Join the Forces because you want to - not as a stepping stone to something else.
 
#12
Have you considered maybe joining the RMP TA and re-sitting Maths GCSE in the meantime? If you join the RMP TA you can go on regular attachments and have a look first hand before commiting yourself. There are quite a few in my unit who are doing this at the minute.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#13
MrShanklysboots said:
Besides all that do not - for a second - believe that being ex RMP woill give you a leg up over other potential recruits in the met. Ex Forces is what they like - Ex RMP, Ex Infantry, Ex Gunner it matters not.

Join the Forces because you want to - not as a stepping stone to something else.
Very true. In fact being ex RMP may not be in your favour if that is your intention.
 
#14
Sorry for the lateness in this reply guys I haven’t been able to get on to ARRSE for the past two days, from hearing about what you guts have to say on this and reading up on the RMP a little more I probably will be better off either getting the C grade or just joining the Royal Marines oh the endless possibilities haha anyway thanks a bunch guys you really have clarified in a no BS way the pros and cons of the job thanks again

Taffy x
 
#15
Sorry to be a pain in the arse guys but im confused again (as always) Ok I spoke to a recruiter yesterday who contacted the RMP and they said on the next intake it was possible for me to join on a "Shading Reference" how often do potential recruits get accepted on a shading reference?????

Cheers again

Taffy (aka pain in the arse welshman)
 
#16
Join the RAF as PTI (or any other trade in the forces) and then when you want to leave (if indeed you do) join the police. From what I gatther and RMP warrent card doesn´t fast track you in to the force, nor does wearing a differenc capbadge exclude you from selection.

If you did a degree in sports, surely you must have some inclination in that directin.

Do what you think you will enjoy NOW, rather than what may or may not help in the future.

I know that is not a black and white answer, and my throw up more questions but...
 
#17
Just to clarify with regards to going from life in green to blue:

The selection for CivPol is done from competency based questions, an assessment centre, and then in some forces a final interview board. At no point does your previous history or knowledge get taken into account. It is all marked on how well you answer the questions, which is why PCSO's and Specials do well in the selection, because they are often coached in the correct answers and mentality before the selection.

Even in the final interview board, the questions should be structured Q's based around the 78 core competencies of a Police Officer. At no point in the process is it acceptable for someone to say "He looks like a good egg, because he's ex-RMP/Gunners/SAS or any other unit." You are supposedly just as likely to get in if you've worked at McDonalds for 5 years, as if you've done 6 years RMP - provided you've got answers for the competency based questions.

Now, yes having a forces background you're likely to have some good examples of situations you've dealt with, but you are also going to lose out on not having much customer care background.

The only way I can see it helping you out is if the person marking your app is ex forces and as such is looking at your answers in a favourable light. But seeing as the forms are largely marked by complete civvies, in HR, the assessment is completely anonymous, the only time I can see you being given favour is in interview. But then not all forces interview, and due to age issues, most senior officers (i.e. the ones interviewing) are not ex-forces, so will they be favourable?

Being ex MilPol will make training easier for you.. but then cops are promoted on their ability to memorise random bits of law and their ability to kiss arse, not on skills. Might find firearms easier to get in, as most of the firearms training teams tend to have Mil backgrounds.

Hope this clears some things up for people. Have seen a lot of questions along the lines of "I'm ex-special forces will the police give me credit for this?", annoyingly and upsettingly, no they won't, they would rather have someone who doesn't have any guts, instinct or common sense....

Shortty
 
#18
Shortty said:
Just to clarify with regards to going from life in green to blue:

The selection for CivPol is done from competency based questions, an assessment centre, and then in some forces a final interview board. At no point does your previous history or knowledge get taken into account. It is all marked on how well you answer the questions, which is why PCSO's and Specials do well in the selection, because they are often coached in the correct answers and mentality before the selection.

Even in the final interview board, the questions should be structured Q's based around the 78 core competencies of a Police Officer. At no point in the process is it acceptable for someone to say "He looks like a good egg, because he's ex-RMP/Gunners/SAS or any other unit." You are supposedly just as likely to get in if you've worked at McDonalds for 5 years, as if you've done 6 years RMP - provided you've got answers for the competency based questions.

Now, yes having a forces background you're likely to have some good examples of situations you've dealt with, but you are also going to lose out on not having much customer care background.

The only way I can see it helping you out is if the person marking your app is ex forces and as such is looking at your answers in a favourable light. But seeing as the forms are largely marked by complete civvies, in HR, the assessment is completely anonymous, the only time I can see you being given favour is in interview. But then not all forces interview, and due to age issues, most senior officers (i.e. the ones interviewing) are not ex-forces, so will they be favourable?

Being ex MilPol will make training easier for you.. but then cops are promoted on their ability to memorise random bits of law and their ability to kiss arse, not on skills. Might find firearms easier to get in, as most of the firearms training teams tend to have Mil backgrounds.

Hope this clears some things up for people. Have seen a lot of questions along the lines of "I'm ex-special forces will the police give me credit for this?", annoyingly and upsettingly, no they won't, they would rather have someone who doesn't have any guts, instinct or common sense....

Shortty
I have to say that Shortty is quite right and having recently completed the process and now having only been at the sharpe end for one month, I feel I am in a position to comment.

The process itself (In my experience anyway) is as follows:

In my particular force you have to attend a two hour 'briefing' which covers in essence how hard it is to get in, (I suppose it's designed to get rid of time wasters). At the end of that briefing which took me four months to get on, you get given your application pack.

No briefing, no pack.

There were 500 briefing places available over 5 days for my particular force and when I applied the places went within two hours.

This part of the process differs from force to force.

Then comes the easy part.... NOT. You fill in the application form, in which are contained four 'competency' based questions.

These questions require you to recall from your past (Either at work or in your personal life), four different scenarios where you dealt with a particular set of circumstances which ended up with either a successful or an adverse concluson. You have to be able to explain the outcme and why you think it ended up that way.

(The questions change frequently, every 6 months, so there is no point in me trying to give you a heads up, in fact I am not allowed to).

You have to disclose the names of your blood and not so blood relations as well as addresses for the last five years (I think). If your ex forces that could prove problematic.

If you pass the paper sift, which includes the simple instruction 'Write in black ink', you are also only allowed four spelling mistakes.

If it is not completed and sent in black ink or your spelling is bad then it gets binned. (Some forces allow online applications, mine didn't).

You then get a letter telling you that you passed the paper sift, (In my case 6 weeks) and that your competency questions have been removed from your application and sent away for independant 'Marking'. (That was a further two weeks).

A few weeks later you get a letter saying you have passed that phase and the letter gives you a choice of dates for the 'Assessment Centre' process. You choose your date, (I would suggest the earliest one available). You then naturally sweat a little.

Bye the way if my spelling is not up to scratch this evening, I have just finished an 18 hour shift, had a beer, but am buzzing therefore cannot sleep. Hence the lenghty reply.

You attend the 'Assessment Centre' with all the other candidates, usually over a period collectively over one week.

This process is conducted by Civilian contract staff (Some are ex police officers/others are not) and Human Resources who have no prior knowledge of YOU, your experiences or life skills. The assessors are emploed by NPIA. (National Police Improvement Agency).

I suppose it is meant to make the process less open to nepotism.

The assessment process itself takes about 7 hours. It includes Maths, problem solving, written and verbal English as well as four scenario based problems, where you interact with actors and assessors on how you would react/deal with particular problems. That bit is a little scary.

(I am not allowed to repeat the scenarios here, candidates have to sign a secrecy agreement/contract).

If you are successful at this stage you then have to go through a raft of vetting, as do your familly, a medical and fitness test and only then will you get a start date.

In my experience Ex Service Personnel take longer to check, as they have spent time out of the country.

The whole process, or for me at least took about 14 months. Others take considerably longer.

My 22 years service did not mean a jot to the 'selectors' and having started at the sharpe end recently, I find myself swimming in a world of information and procedure which is meant for people 'straight out of the box'.

I have just completed a week with the 'Tactical team' kicking in peoples doors and each day I finished a minimum of 4 hours later than advertised.

I have of course submitted my overtime forms.

There were 138 people at my assessment centre of which 30 got through to the final stages. Of those candidates 3 are now police officers. If you take that to the extreme about 12 of the 500 got offered a job.

Having come through the other end, and now wearing a blue uniform rather than green it is, for me at least a daily uphill struggle.

No two days are the same and despite at times feeling too old and rather inadequate, I would suggest that if it's what you want to do, it's well worth the graft.

You then spend 17 weeks at a training facility, followed by 8 - 12 weeks in company with a 'Tutor'. You are on probation for two years.

In conclusion, do not expect an easy ride cause your ex this or that. If you do you will be bitterly dissapointed.

Notty.
 
#19
Firstly Notty, well done and nice to see you doing well. As for your recruitment process what a blooming nonsence. This is a clear sign of a self perpetuating HR industry and I doubt very much if this does anything to improve the quality of recruit.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#20
Whilst such a lengthy selection process may prevent as he says, any 'nepotism', it would appear to allow for 'quotas'. Unless there's a safe guard built in for that as well. It also appears to be keeping a lot of civil servants in full time employment. But maybe that's the whole idea.
 

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