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RMP FAQ

As one of the site’s resident RMP I thought I’d take the time to prepare a ‘Sticky’ post to answer some of the frequently asked questions prospective RMP candidates have.

The official page Army Website, Provost.


First and foremost, might as well get the most obvious question out the way...

Will RMP service help me get into Home Office Police?

No. It will however give you a firm grounding in legislation and police training. If you serve as RMP, CivPol training won’t be any great hardship and I know of many colleagues who have gone on to thrive once leaving. The Babcock Diploma is accepted by a number of civilian police forces, normally to reduce probation timelines, but it won’t get you through selection.

If your goal is simply to join HOPF then explore more of the Army, not just RMP.


Whats the training like?

JNCO: Following Ph 1, you will attend the Defence School of Policing and Guarding at Southwick Park near Portsmouth. You’ll complete around 20 weeks of police training which covers legislation, interviewing, basic police skills and exercise. Following that you’ll be assigned to a General Police Duties Provost Company. Post training you’ll take part in a Babcock apprenticeship where you’ll be signed off for a diploma.

Officers: Following RMAS you’ll attend DSPG for around 12 weeks (course length under review) where you’ll cover basic police training up to Class 1 Cpl standard (the Volume Crime Investigation Course) and an exercise phase. From there you’ll go to the Pro Coy you were assigned while at Sandhurst.


What’s the job like?

JNCO: Following training at DSPG you’ll be assigned to a Pl. Each Pl rotates between Ops/Trg and Policing. The rotation length varies by Coy. You’ll be expected to work shifts and deploy as part of a Garrison Police framework. Depending on location you’ll work with varying levels of closeness with HOPF – for example Colchester, you’re essentially another Essex Police C/S, other forces not so much.

Officer: You’ll spend your first posting as a Pl Comd. You’ll be mentored by your Pl 2IC, a SSgt who will mentor you in policework and managing casefiles. Following that it is very common to progress to Coy Ops Offr or DSPG Pl Comd.

Garrison Policing is some of the most varied work you’ll do in the army. When you book on shift especially on a pay weekend, you never know what you'll deal with; from the absurd - wrangling escaped horses from the garrison saddle club (traffic wand in one hand, asp in another herding them around the MSQ estate), to the manic where the police response has been every C/S in a town (and then called in the Autobahn Polizei). You may also be called to police large scale events, such as the Army/Navy rugby match which is great crack.
Garrison policing is extremely rewarding and unpredictable, and personally one of the best jobs in the army.


Where will I be posted?

Initially you’ll be posted to a Provost Company, these are located in:

Leuchars
Catterick
Donnington
Bulford
Aldershot
Colchester

You’ll live in, and I strongly encourage you to be a contributor to the Cpls’ Mess.

Most Pro Coys operate a series of Police Posts in Garrison areas which consist of 1-2 man dets.




Operations:

We perform a number of roles operationally. As a GPD JNCO and YO you can expect to perform the following:

Traffic Control: 'Mobility Support' in the new lexicon. The RMP's primary warfighting role is control of military traffic, usually from SPOD to BSG, and then forward to the B Echelon. RMP Regiments attach to Divisions with its Sub-Units attaching to Bdes and will provide Provost advice, traffic control, escort and route recce to Log Sp elements. As well as providing Force Provost Marshals for various formations.
Other arms will see evidence of this as Traffic Posts, route signs and patrols. What they also like to do is running over route signs because they think its funny - what this actually leads to is the ball-bagged RLC driver missing a turn and someones food and ammo not turning up.

Secondly, RMP will support 'tactical movement,' which is where Provost elements provide traffic control to co-ordinate key points during situations such as an attack, a relief in place, obstacle crossings or a rearward passage of lines. Essentially wherever there is potential for confusion and snarl up of vehicles a Traffic Post and pointsman will ease the flow of traffic. They will also co-ordinate movement across formation boundaries and provide guards for demolitions.

CPERS: We provide advice on capturing, searching and detaining captured persons on the battlefield, this includes biometric enrollment. We will advise on constructing and manning of holding areas and processing of CPERS.

Close Protection: VSOs and those who PJHQ deem require it, receive a Close Protection Team of varying size to protect them and facilitate movement around both the battlefield and rear areas.

Op PLUNDER: RMP undertake, on behalf of MOD and HMIC, searches of baggage, freight and vehicles returning from the UK from an operational theatre. This is to provide surety to HMG that the MOD is taking steps to reduce/remove importation of contraband, and control of 'excise' goods.

Stability Policing: Establishing or maintaining rule of law in a country without, or with a reduced police force.

Misc: RMP also undertake more diverse roles, primarily in small teams providing advice to commanders in various situations. PM for further details.

RMP are still able to provide 'Close Support' to Battlegroups where they will be embedded to provide intimate police support where needed, for example during HERRICK one of my Platoon's roles was CPERS handling and forensic exploitation of firing points. RMP will also be required in strike operations for both CPERS handling and evidence recovery. This role saw RMP embed across the whole spectrum of UK combat operations.


Close Protection:

RMP provide bodyguards and close protection teams for Senior Officers on Operations and Her Majesty's Ambassadors in high threat countries.

JNCO: Express an interest and you’ll be loaded onto the Close Protection Course (CPC). The course is arduous, however extremely enjoyable (once the stress has worn off!). You will be mentored throughout your CP career, for example your first couple of tours will be as a team member, the third as a 2ic and fourth as a Team Leader or ISODET Commander. These will follow your rank progression. You can be posted to CPU as a JNCO so if this is a career field you’re interested in then please express an interest.

Officers: Get yourself on the CPC ASAP after Commissioning. This will maximise your deployability, as you’ll be very busy as a Capt getting all your career courses in. The rules have changed now and a Lt can deploy without any Ops experience (reflecting the current op tempo). You’ll get one maybe two tours in, however more than that will start to impact your career progression. It certainly isn’t something you can make a career out of. If the chicken bones fall correctly you may be posted as the Ops Offr or Trg Offr but don’t bank on this. Also (several years down the line) CPU is on the rotation as Sub-Unit Command, if its on your rotation then give it a go.
CP is certainly some of the most interesting and frustrating work I’ve done - and sometimes its extremely boring, but the places you go and the people you meet make up for it. Hand on heart its challenging and enjoyable – especially the shooting.


SIB

The RMP’s detectives, headquartered in Campion Lines, Bulford they deal with all serious and complex crime involving the service community globally. They also hold Coronial responsibility to investigate and secure evidence of any death involving service personnel overseas (hence why we were so visible in Afghan and Iraq).

JNCOs: Establish yourself as a decent investigator and request a ‘look at life.’ This may progress to a formal attachment where you’ll enter the SIB career stream. This consists of a 2 year attachment to a Section where you must hit your training objectives and passing the Serious Crime Investigations Course (SCIC). Following that you’ll be put forward to the ‘Transfer of Employment Board’ (TEB), as the SIB is a separate trade to GPD (RMP (GPD) and RMP (SIB)) you will be boarded and offered a position as a A/Sgt within the SIB. You’ll receive excellent training alongside home office police colleagues in almost every field of serious and complex investigation.

Offrs: Again, establish yourself as a decent investigator. Your OC may arrange informal attachment of some sort in your first posting to give you a taste of it. A further, formal attachment is required before the Sect OC will recommend you to command a SIB Section.

Career stream for Officers is to attend either the Senior Investigating Officers’ Course or the Detective Inspectors’ Course (MSCIDP) with a Home Office force, I did mine and it not only gave you the confidence to deal with anything that came your way, with the accreditation it gave you the credibility to deal with HOPF detectives on their level.
I was Sect OC for nearly 2 years and loved every second of it.


If RMP isn't for you, or you're just perusing the thread, I'd like you to take one lesson away:

Remember we are friendly forces, we exist to provide the security and rights of the English Criminal Justice System wherever you are, you may think why? But just remember the next time there's a serious incident overseas, would you really want to be dealt with by Host Nation law enforcement?
Likewise, if, tragically there's a death overseas please remember we are there primarily as representatives of HM Coroner.

We work for your CO and the Service Justice System and we exist to return manpower back to combat effectiveness as quickly as possible; therefore preserving the moral component of fighting power.
 
Last edited:

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
This isn't a forum for slagging off RMP, there are plenty of other places on this site to do that.
 
That happens anyway, if its anything more than a minor scrap in a bar then your off to the local police just as you are in the UK.
Care to give an example of a serious crime that has been dealt with under host nation CJS?

Because I in my current role, I am dealing with enquiries that would show otherwise.
 
Last edited:

Buddy!

War Hero
Excellent post; I think most in the wider Army don't understand the wide ranging role of the RMP.
 
As one of the site’s resident RMP I thought I’d take the time to prepare a ‘Sticky’ post to answer some of the frequently asked questions prospective RMP candidates have.

The official page Army Website, Provost.


First and foremost, might as well get the most obvious question out the way...

Will RMP service help me get into Home Office Police?

No. It will however give you a firm grounding in legislation and police training. If you serve as RMP, CivPol training won’t be any great hardship and I know of many colleagues who have gone on to thrive once leaving. The Babcock Diploma is accepted by a number of civilian police forces, normally to reduce probation timelines, but it won’t get you through selection.

If your goal is simply to join HOPF then explore more of the Army, not just RMP.


Whats the training like?

JNCO: Following Ph 1, you will attend the Defence School of Policing and Guarding at Southwick Park near Portsmouth. You’ll complete around 20 weeks of police training which covers legislation, interviewing, basic police skills and exercise. Following that you’ll be assigned to a General Police Duties Provost Company. Post training you’ll take part in a Babcock apprenticeship where you’ll be signed off for a diploma.

Officers: Following RMAS you’ll attend DSPG for around 12 weeks (course length under review) where you’ll cover basic police training up to Class 1 Cpl standard (the Volume Crime Investigation Course) and an exercise phase. From there you’ll go to the Pro Coy you were assigned while at Sandhurst.


What’s the job like?

JNCO: Following training at DSPG you’ll be assigned to a Pl. Each Pl rotates between Ops/Trg and Policing. The rotation length varies by Coy. You’ll be expected to work shifts and deploy as part of a Garrison Police framework. Depending on location you’ll work with varying levels of closeness with HOPF – for example Colchester, you’re essentially another Essex Police C/S, other forces not so much.

Officer: You’ll spend your first posting as a Pl Comd. You’ll be mentored by your Pl 2IC, a SSgt who will mentor you in policework and managing casefiles. Following that it is very common to progress to Coy Ops Offr or DSPG Pl Comd.

Garrison Policing is some of the most varied work you’ll do in the army. When you book on shift especially on a pay weekend, you never know what you'll deal with; from the absurd - wrangling escaped horses from the garrison saddle club (traffic wand in one hand, asp in another herding them around the MSQ estate), to the manic where the police response has been every C/S in a town (and then called in the Autobahn Polizei). You may also be called to police large scale events, such as the Army/Navy rugby match which is great crack.
Garrison policing is extremely rewarding and unpredictable, and personally one of the best jobs in the army.


Where will I be posted?

Initially you’ll be posted to a Provost Company, these are located in:

Leuchars
Catterick
Donnington
Bulford
Aldershot
Colchester

You’ll live in, and I strongly encourage you to be a contributor to the Cpls’ Mess.

Most Pro Coys operate a series of Police Posts in Garrison areas which consist of 1-2 man dets.




Operations:

We perform a number of roles operationally. As a GPD JNCO and YO you can expect to perform the following:

Traffic Control: 'Mobility Support' in the new lexicon. The RMP's primary warfighting role is control of military traffic, usually from SPOD to BSG, and then forward to the B Echelon. RMP Regiments attach to Divisions with its Sub-Units attaching to Bdes and will provide Provost advice, traffic control, escort and route recce to Log Sp elements. As well as providing Force Provost Marshals for various formations.
Other arms will see evidence of this as Traffic Posts, route signs and patrols. What they also like to do is running over route signs because they think its funny - what this actually leads to is the ball-bagged RLC driver missing a turn and someones food and ammo not turning up.

Secondly, RMP will support 'tactical movement,' which is where Provost elements provide traffic control to co-ordinate key points during situations such as an attack, a relief in place, obstacle crossings or a rearward passage of lines. Essentially wherever there is potential for confusion and snarl up of vehicles a Traffic Post and pointsman will ease the flow of traffic. They will also co-ordinate movement across formation boundaries and provide guards for demolitions.

CPERS: We provide advice on capturing, searching and detaining captured persons on the battlefield, this includes biometric enrollment. We will advise on constructing and manning of holding areas and processing of CPERS.

Close Protection: VSOs and those who PJHQ deem require it, receive a Close Protection Team of varying size to protect them and facilitate movement around both the battlefield and rear areas.

Op PLUNDER: RMP undertake, on behalf of MOD and HMIC, searches of baggage, freight and vehicles returning from the UK from an operational theatre. This is to provide surety to HMG that the MOD is taking steps to reduce/remove importation of contraband, and control of 'excise' goods.

Stability Policing: Establishing or maintaining rule of law in a country without, or with a reduced police force.

Misc: RMP also undertake more diverse roles, primarily in small teams providing advice to commanders in various situations. PM for further details.

RMP are still able to provide 'Close Support' to Battlegroups where they will be embedded to provide intimate police support where needed, for example during HERRICK one of my Platoon's roles was CPERS handling and forensic exploitation of firing points. RMP will also be required in strike operations for both CPERS handling and evidence recovery. This role saw RMP embed across the whole spectrum of UK combat operations.


Close Protection:

RMP provide bodyguards and close protection teams for Senior Officers on Operations and Her Majesty's Ambassadors in high threat countries.

JNCO: Express an interest and you’ll be loaded onto the Close Protection Course (CPC). The course is arduous, however extremely enjoyable (once the stress has worn off!). You will be mentored throughout your CP career, for example your first couple of tours will be as a team member, the third as a 2ic and fourth as a Team Leader or ISODET Commander. These will follow your rank progression. You can be posted to CPU as a JNCO so if this is a career field you’re interested in then please express an interest.

Officers: Get yourself on the CPC ASAP after Commissioning. This will maximise your deployability, as you’ll be very busy as a Capt getting all your career courses in. The rules have changed now and a Lt can deploy without any Ops experience (reflecting the current op tempo). You’ll get one maybe two tours in, however more than that will start to impact your career progression. It certainly isn’t something you can make a career out of. If the chicken bones fall correctly you may be posted as the Ops Offr or Trg Offr but don’t bank on this. Also (several years down the line) CPU is on the rotation as Sub-Unit Command, if its on your rotation then give it a go.
CP is certainly some of the most interesting and frustrating work I’ve done - and sometimes its extremely boring, but the places you go and the people you meet make up for it. Hand on heart its challenging and enjoyable – especially the shooting.


SIB

The RMP’s detectives, headquartered in Campion Lines, Bulford they deal with all serious and complex crime involving the service community globally. They also hold Coronial responsibility to investigate and secure evidence of any death involving service personnel overseas (hence why we were so visible in Afghan and Iraq).

JNCOs: Establish yourself as a decent investigator and request a ‘look at life.’ This may progress to a formal attachment where you’ll enter the SIB career stream. This consists of a 2 year attachment to a Section where you must hit your training objectives and passing the Serious Crime Investigations Course (SCIC). Following that you’ll be put forward to the ‘Transfer of Employment Board’ (TEB), as the SIB is a separate trade to GPD (RMP (GPD) and RMP (SIB)) you will be boarded and offered a position as a A/Sgt within the SIB. You’ll receive excellent training alongside home office police colleagues in almost every field of serious and complex investigation.

Offrs: Again, establish yourself as a decent investigator. Your OC may arrange informal attachment of some sort in your first posting to give you a taste of it. A further, formal attachment is required before the Sect OC will recommend you to command a SIB Section.

Career stream for Officers is to attend either the Senior Investigating Officers’ Course or the Detective Inspectors’ Course (MSCIDP) with a Home Office force, I did mine and it not only gave you the confidence to deal with anything that came your way, with the accreditation it gave you the credibility to deal with HOPF detectives on their level.
I was Sect OC for nearly 2 years and loved every second of it.


If RMP isn't for you, or you're just perusing the thread, I'd like you to take one lesson away:

Remember we are friendly forces, we exist to provide the security and rights of the English Criminal Justice System wherever you are, you may think why? But just remember the next time there's a serious incident overseas, would you really want to be dealt with by Host Nation law enforcement?
Likewise, if, tragically there's a death overseas please remember we are there primarily as representatives of HM Coroner.

We work for your CO and the Service Justice System and we exist to return manpower back to combat effectiveness as quickly as possible; therefore preserving the moral component of fighting power.

what an excellent post.
 
Things have changed immensely from my day, I left RMP 27 years ago! ;)
Mate things have changed even in the relatively short 16 years I’ve been in.
When I joined there were 5 Regiments of GPD, and you had the pick of 11 Pro Coys after training. It’s a brave new world I can tell you...
 
Looking for some answers, I'm a Special Con aspiring to join RMP; whats the day to day like? Ie. Booking on for a shift (assuming it's a 12 hr for argument sake).

1) I assume there will be some sort of phys incorporated into your TOD or is it just like civpol, turning up, brew up and wait out for taskings etc.

2) Also, in terms of blue light training, not something you would really use. I've heard mixed things about the course; simply put, is it still being put on.

3) The experience I've got in terms of investigations, PEACE trained, CAMIC trained etc. Will this stand in good stead or will it get completely tossed off?

Thanks in advance
 
Looking for some answers, I'm a Special Con aspiring to join RMP; whats the day to day like? Ie. Booking on for a shift (assuming it's a 12 hr for argument sake).

1) I assume there will be some sort of phys incorporated into your TOD or is it just like civpol, turning up, brew up and wait out for taskings etc.

2) Also, in terms of blue light training, not something you would really use. I've heard mixed things about the course; simply put, is it still being put on.

3) The experience I've got in terms of investigations, PEACE trained, CAMIC trained etc. Will this stand in good stead or will it get completely tossed off?

Thanks in advance
Join the real police, chum. Joking aside, the Monkey’s are ******* hopeless.
 

QRK2

LE
Looking for some answers, I'm a Special Con aspiring to join RMP; whats the day to day like? Ie. Booking on for a shift (assuming it's a 12 hr for argument sake).

1) I assume there will be some sort of phys incorporated into your TOD or is it just like civpol, turning up, brew up and wait out for taskings etc.

2) Also, in terms of blue light training, not something you would really use. I've heard mixed things about the course; simply put, is it still being put on.

3) The experience I've got in terms of investigations, PEACE trained, CAMIC trained etc. Will this stand in good stead or will it get completely tossed off?

Thanks in advance

Are you sure you mean you want to join RMP not Mod Plod?
 

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