RMAS VS LYMPSTONE

What are the main differences in training between RMAS and Lympstone (Officer) in terms of difficulty and content, and is the RM POC more competitive than AOSB?
Many Thanks.
 

Bobby_Bert

Old-Salt
Both are competitive.

The Royal Marines have only one YO entry annually. Typically they run intakes of approximately fifty. A Royal Marines Commando Officer is essentially an infantry based command.

RMAS is a larger machine and you have a wide selection of cap badges available to you. Both Commissioning Courses are accredited by various academic and professional institutions.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
I haven't done the AOSB - No 1 Apprentice did. Told to come back a year later. Joined BA instead.

But I had the pleasure of observing a three day POC back in the 80s at sunny Lympestone.

( being the RM we 'observers' were issued with denims and ran the Woodbury Common course, Peters Pool (including the delightful submerged section) and back to CTCRM....also did the 'Death Slide', and the aerial course....all without webbing or a weapon)

Of the 12 guys on the course three crocked themselves, one already had an offer from the Met, 2 actually passed the POC.

Of these two, 1 passed his subsequent AIB. He duly commissioned into the Corps.
Finished as a major - but drowned at sea off Norway during a Poole type exercise.

All in all, I would say the Pass/Fail rate is higher at Lympestone. It's not for everyone.

 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Lympstone is significantly harder than RMAS with a much higher failure rate. It combines a YOs course with light infantry training and the commando tests. For the army those are three separate courses.

That doesn't mean that RMAS is worse - it's just different. RMAS spends significntly more time on academic work than Lympstone, for example.
 

Issi

War Hero
There's still a series on IPlayer showing the training for RM officers. Dated but still really interesting.
 

chimera

LE
Moderator

Oyibo

LE
What are the main differences in training between RMAS and Lympstone (Officer) in terms of difficulty and content, and is the RM POC more competitive than AOSB?
Many Thanks.
Lympstone would be harder for the minimum levels of fitness to pass, but you would have limited options compared to RMAS - when I was in the Army (a long time ago, I'll admit) surplus RM YOs were being sent to infantry Pl Comd slots because there were not enough vacant in RM.

If you aim for something like the Parachute Regiment while at RMAS you'll have to show some pretty damn good levels of fitness before you are even considered a candidate for P Coy, so while at Lympstone everyone is judged at the same level, at RMAS one is assessed for suitability for any part of the Army.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Talk to @Ninja_Stoker - he worked in the recruiting world much more recently than me.

Not saying what you read is wrong - but he will be able to give you a definitive answer.

I would haxard a guess that COVID has put pretty much everything on hold for the foreseeable.
 
Lympstone would be harder for the minimum levels of fitness to pass, but you would have limited options compared to RMAS - when I was in the Army (a long time ago, I'll admit) surplus RM YOs were being sent to infantry Pl Comd slots because there were not enough vacant in RM.

If you aim for something like the Parachute Regiment while at RMAS you'll have to show some pretty damn good levels of fitness before you are even considered a candidate for P Coy, so while at Lympstone everyone is judged at the same level, at RMAS one is assessed for suitability for any part of the Army.
When I did the AACC, the Army Commando units in Plymouth ran a 3 week pre-Commando course to weed out the time wasters (i.e. those who saw it as a springboard away from an unliked posting) because the RM were complaining that so many were failing at Lympstone and it wasn't their job to act as unofficial redeployment clerks for the Army. It ensured that the only people that got to Lympstone were those that actually wanted to be there (and also had a good chance of passing).
 
When I did the AACC, the Army Commando units in Plymouth ran a 3 week pre-Commando course to weed out the time wasters (i.e. those who saw it as a springboard away from an unliked posting) because the RM were complaining that so many were failing at Lympstone and it wasn't their job to act as unofficial redeployment clerks for the Army. It ensured that the only people that got to Lympstone were those that actually wanted to be there (and also had a good chance of passing).
If someone could get through the Beat Up they only had to stay (relatively speaking) injury free to pass Lympstone.

No mean feat staying injury free.
 
If someone could get through the Beat Up they only had to stay (relatively speaking) injury free to pass Lympstone.

No mean feat staying injury free.
The only one that we lost at Lympstone was an RE Officer who 'soldiered on' with an ankle injury. He carried on until the Dartmoor phase then it got so bad, the Staff took him off for his own good. Met him later in Plymouth - I think he was resquadded and got through that time. We also had a gunner joined late who had the same thing happen on an earlier course. We had two that asked to be taken off - one was a US Marine sergeant who thought it was a waste of his time and RTU'd himself. He basically terminated his career by this action - if Vietnam had still been going on, he would have been sent to the worst part. As it was, he was redeployed to Guam within a few days. The other one was an RN doctor who went to see the Surgeon Commander and asked to be taken off. The Surgeon Commander had a green lid and had passed AACC aged 40 - he told him to grow a pair and sent him back on the course!
 

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